Basic income

Fully Automated Luxury Socialism: The Case for a New Public Sector

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 08/01/2018 - 7:15pm in

The rise of the service sector eased the pressures of deindustrialization and automation. But it didn’t change the power relations in the economy—and neither will a basic income.

Ontario Basic Income Pilot in Difficulties

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 20/12/2017 - 2:45am in

The basic income pilot currently taking place in Ontario has run into problems over concerns that the money provided may be taken by landlords and large companies. Issues have arisen regarding wage garnishment and debt liens, both of which allow companies to take money directly from the accounts of those who owe them unpaid debts. As the money provided during

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Social Security Reform: Revisiting Henderson, Poverty and Basic Income

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 19/12/2017 - 2:21pm in

2018 Henderson Conference

The 2018 Henderson conference will focus on how the social security system can more effectively respond to issues of poverty and inequality. Over the course of two days, a variety of speakers will cover what key changes have taken place since the 1970s and the Henderson Poverty Inquiry – to the labour market, families and to the position of vulnerable groups – and will assess the effectiveness of how social security has responded. It will also canvas different options for reform, including proposals for some kind of a basic income in Australia.Date:  Thursday 15 – Friday 16 February 2018
Venue: University of Melbourne, The Spot Building, 198 Berkeley Street, Carlton

A conference dinner will be held on the night of Thursday 15 February 2018 at Graduate House, 220 Leicester Street, Carlton. Tickets to this dinner are limited; purchase yours upon registering for the conference to secure your spot.

Speakers

More than 20 experts will gather to discuss Australia’s social security system, how it has changed over time, and its effectiveness in responding to the challenges of poverty and inequality in Australia today. Read about the Henderson Anniversary Project Publication authors and conference speakers here.

Registration Details

Registrations are now open – purchase your ticket(s) through the Melbourne Institute eCart.

Standard (two day) ticket $180
Concession (two day) ticket $30*

Standard dinner ticket $90
Concession dinner ticket $40*

*Please note that proof of concession is required to gain access to the conference and dinner.

For queries, please contact Caitlin Hindmarsh melb-conf@unimelb.edu.au (03) 9035 8135.

 

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US: Reverend Dr William Barber revives Dr King’s concept of “guaranteed income” as part of new Civil Rights movement

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 20/11/2017 - 8:15pm in

Reverend Dr William Barber. Credit to: Flickr   Reverend Dr William Barber of Birmingham, Alabama, has spoken of the need for a “breakthrough” in the civil rights movement in the US, citing an acceptable development being a point where “every poor person has a guaranteed income”. During his tour across 14 states, Rev Barber talked of the need for a

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The New York Times acknowledges the Basic Income worldwide movement

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sat, 18/11/2017 - 6:00pm in

Peter S. Goodman, a veteran economics journalist, wrote a comprehensive piece about the recent Basic Income developments for the New York Times. In this piece, Goodman refers to the main motivations behind the idea of Basic Income as including the current wage stagnation, the lack of jobs to support the middle class and the threat of automation. The idea, Goodman

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Universal Basic Income and the Duty to Work

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 13/11/2017 - 9:02pm in

What should a government faced with an unmanageable level of unemployment do when conventional policy has failed to resolve the issue?

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Basic income national proposal released by ‘UBI Taiwan’

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Thu, 26/10/2017 - 11:25pm in

UBI Taiwan held a press conference to explain their proposal to give every Taiwanese citizen a basic income each month.

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EU Minimum Income Overhaul

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 16/10/2017 - 6:37am in

The Employment Committee of the European Union (EU) has called for all member states to provide a minimum income, or to upgrade existing minimum income schemes. A minimum income, unlike universal basic income (UBI), is not distributed to all citizens. In most European countries, a minimum income is already provided conditionally, taking the form of various unemployment benefits, child benefit

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BBC de-growth video recommends basic income

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Thu, 14/09/2017 - 11:33pm in

In a recent video released by the BBC, anthropologist Dr Jason Hickel argues for a form of planned de-growth which includes the provision of basic income. Hickel is employed by the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), which for several years has been ranked second in the world for social sciences by the QS World University Rankings. In

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Thursday, 7 September 2017 - 6:21pm

Published by Matthew Davidson on Thu, 07/09/2017 - 6:21pm in

I've been meaning to go through the literature on every thrust and parry in the ongoing argument between proponents of a Job Guarantee and those of a Basic Income, and put together a thorough response. That's not going to happen in the next month or so, so in case I get hit by a bus, here's two paragraphs of where I stand (or don't stand) in the debate, lifted from a comment I just posted on Neil Wilson's blog:

Basic income vs. job guarantee is a false dichotomy that ill serves anybody who takes sides. There is undoubtably some overlap in that they both aim to reduce hardship and stimulate demand, but as far as I can see they’re mostly orthogonal in the range of problems they can potentially solve. Also they’re both programs that we already run, in the sense that we (in developed sovereign currency economies) already have a labour buffer stock program — unemployment — and a basic income, set at the level of zero.

I’m totally sold on (at least my understanding of) the job guarantee as a better implementation of a labour buffer stock, but I don’t think that “with a job guarantee in place, no matter what the particular circumstances may be, anywhere and forever, no level of basic income other than zero could be justifiable” is a defensible argument. And it runs counter to the general MMT stance of “these are the economic policy tools available; how you choose to use them is a political decision”.

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