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New Book of Essays in Honor of Roncaglia

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 21/02/2018 - 3:41am in

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Director of Research Jan Kregel is one of the editors and contributors for a new collection of essays devoted to the work of Alessandro Roncaglia:

Classical Economics Today: Essays in Honor of Alessandro Roncaglia is a collection of essays that pays tribute to Alessandro Roncaglia whose research is based on Schumpeter’s dictum that good economics must encompass history, economic theory and statistics, and therefore does not generally take the form of elegant formal models that are applicable to all and everything. In this direction, Roncaglia is inspired by the Classical economists of the past and becomes a model for present-day Classical economists. A perceptible family air imbues the essays: all the contributors are friends of Roncaglia and see his personality and his interests as a common point of reference.

View the table of contents below the fold:

The Reconstruction of an Alternative Economic Thought: Some Premises, Salvatore Biasco;

Reflections on Unity and Diversity, the Market and Economic Policy, Jan Kregel;

Ending Laissez-Faire Finance, Mario Tonveronachi;

Democracy in Crisis: So What’s New?, Michele Salvati;

The Democracy of Ideas: J. S. Mill, Liberalism and the Economic Debate, Marcella Corsi and Carlo D’Ippoliti;

Turgot and the Division of Labor, Peter Groenewegen;

Agricultural Surplus and the Means of Production, Gianni Vaggi;

The Role of Sraffa Prices in Post-Keynesian Pricing Theory, Geoffrey Harcourt;

Classical Underconsumption Theories Reassessed, Cosimo Perrotta;

On the “Photograph” Interpretation of Piero Sraffa’s Production Equations: A View from the Sraffa Archive, Heinz D. Kurz and Neri Salvadori;

On the Earliest Formulations of Sraffa’s Equations, Nerio Naldi;

Normal and Degenerate Solutions of the Walras- Morishima Model, Bertram Schefold;

Trading in the “Devil’s Metal”: Keynes’s Speculation and Investment in Tin (1921–46), Maria Cristina Marcuzzo and Annalisa Rosselli;

The Oil Question, the Prices of Production and a Metaphor, Sergio Parrinello;

Europe and Italy: Expansionary Austerity and Expansionary Precariousness, Davide Antonioli and Paolo Pini;

Adam Smith and the Neophysiocrats: War of Ideas in Spain (1800–4), Alfonso Sánchez Hormigo

New Book of Essays in Honor of Roncaglia

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 21/02/2018 - 3:41am in

Tags 

Books, Book

Director of Research Jan Kregel is one of the editors and contributors for a new collection of essays devoted to the work of Alessandro Roncaglia:

Classical Economics Today: Essays in Honor of Alessandro Roncaglia is a collection of essays that pays tribute to Alessandro Roncaglia whose research is based on Schumpeter’s dictum that good economics must encompass history, economic theory and statistics, and therefore does not generally take the form of elegant formal models that are applicable to all and everything. In this direction, Roncaglia is inspired by the Classical economists of the past and becomes a model for present-day Classical economists. A perceptible family air imbues the essays: all the contributors are friends of Roncaglia and see his personality and his interests as a common point of reference.

View the table of contents below the fold:

The Reconstruction of an Alternative Economic Thought: Some Premises, Salvatore Biasco;

Reflections on Unity and Diversity, the Market and Economic Policy, Jan Kregel;

Ending Laissez-Faire Finance, Mario Tonveronachi;

Democracy in Crisis: So What’s New?, Michele Salvati;

The Democracy of Ideas: J. S. Mill, Liberalism and the Economic Debate, Marcella Corsi and Carlo D’Ippoliti;

Turgot and the Division of Labor, Peter Groenewegen;

Agricultural Surplus and the Means of Production, Gianni Vaggi;

The Role of Sraffa Prices in Post-Keynesian Pricing Theory, Geoffrey Harcourt;

Classical Underconsumption Theories Reassessed, Cosimo Perrotta;

On the “Photograph” Interpretation of Piero Sraffa’s Production Equations: A View from the Sraffa Archive, Heinz D. Kurz and Neri Salvadori;

On the Earliest Formulations of Sraffa’s Equations, Nerio Naldi;

Normal and Degenerate Solutions of the Walras- Morishima Model, Bertram Schefold;

Trading in the “Devil’s Metal”: Keynes’s Speculation and Investment in Tin (1921–46), Maria Cristina Marcuzzo and Annalisa Rosselli;

The Oil Question, the Prices of Production and a Metaphor, Sergio Parrinello;

Europe and Italy: Expansionary Austerity and Expansionary Precariousness, Davide Antonioli and Paolo Pini;

Adam Smith and the Neophysiocrats: War of Ideas in Spain (1800–4), Alfonso Sánchez Hormigo

Doctor Who and the Krikkitmen

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Thu, 08/02/2018 - 7:07am in

 BBC Books)
Written by James Goss
Story by Douglas Adams
Published 18 January 2018
BBC Books
416 Pages

As we all know The Krikkitmen are now more well known for the action based and anglophile mocking aspects of Life, the Universe and everything, the 3rd book in Douglas Adams 5 book trilogy. So by reading this novel are we just reliving those moments with Ford and Arthur removed and the Doctor and Romana inserted in?

Well no, this is a lovely example of how much Douglas Adams was a massive doctor who fan with a return to Gallifrey and maybe a jokey feel that would more suit his time on the series in late 70’s than the Hinchcliffe era. James Goss has the Adams style down so much, I began to forget that I wasn’t reading Douglas Adams at all, Something that Eoin Colfer’s Hitchhiker installment was lacking, reliant itself on more of a ‘greatest hits’ fan-pleasing prose than a style of its own.

The plot itself follows similar beats to the hitchhiker version with sometimes only location and character changes, but a part of me wishes It had been given the Hinchcliffe treatment.Far out in the spiral arm of a distant reality, Douglas Adams got full creative control of the long-running BBC television institution Doctor Who earlier than expected. Impressing Philip Hinchcliffe with his first proposed idea involving robotic cricket players taking on the whole universe,

in 1977 The whole show was handed over to Doug Who before you could say ‘ok, when did that happen?’ Well sadly in our side of existence, this never took place, the advantage being that Mr Adams went on to make Hitchhiker's Guide to the galaxy whilst in that reality he just went around telling that biscuit story. So then when after not sitting in a small cafe in Rickmansworth, but succeeding in producing both Shada & The Pirate Planet novels, James Goss had another unique epiphany and did sort of the same thing again only slightly different.

This witty script could have been tailored to that gothic aesthetic and would have replaced the to my mind just as silly android invasion. Imagine the Krikkitmen gleaming menacingly, still ready to strike a lethal six. Obviously, on the show's budget we wouldn’t see as many as their forces as is described here, but maybe less is more. Adam’s script via James Goss’s talent is funny and fast-paced maybe too ambitious for Television, but an absolute hoot to read.

Like pirate planet before it or technically ahead of it (depending on where you are stood in the vortex) The narrative is complex, but the inventiveness is constant, witty and the down to earthness of our heroes helps even if they are both timelords. A race against time literally as The Krikkitmen seem undefeatable, The Doctor and Romana’s dynamic -quipping and solving throughout meeting up with Borusa and others make you care And this comes across in not only the writing but the scale.

The universe has often been on the brink of disaster in recent TV Doctor Who and either avoided or somehow kick-started back into existence with little of us thinking our heroes were that close to losing. In This Novel, I was with The writer, the characters, the plot all the way and hope maybe Big Finish Will consider doing an adaptation. With an infamous fictional book always a comparison, Doctor Who and The Krikkitmen makes you wonder what could have been as it is one of the best books produced this side of the unfashionable end of the western spiral of the galaxy

New Book: “It’s Basic Income”

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 07/02/2018 - 7:37pm in

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A new book has just been released by Policy Press, an imprint of Bristol University Press. Titled It’s Basic Income: The global debate, it binds the contributions of many different authors, activists and researchers dwelling in the basic income global debate. Among these, one can read the input of Bruna Augusto, Sarath Davala, Brian Eno, Louise Haagh, Otto Lehto, Francine

The post New Book: “It’s Basic Income” appeared first on BIEN.

US: Chris Hughes, co-chair of the Economic Security Project (ESP), favours means tested guaranteed income for working poor over UBI in new book

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 26/01/2018 - 7:38pm in

In a July 2017 televised Town Hall with KCET, Economic Security Project co-chairs Chris Hughes and Natalie Foster were asked about the principles of a Universal Basic Income. Public questions from Facebook were delivered by the moderator, the first common concern of which was: should we “give everybody a Basic Income,” even the lazy and wealthy? Foster took the question

The post US: Chris Hughes, co-chair of the Economic Security Project (ESP), favours means tested guaranteed income for working poor over UBI in new book appeared first on BIEN.

JHP’s Best Book in the History of Philosophy Prize

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Thu, 25/01/2018 - 12:59am in

Each year, the Journal of the History of Philosophy awards a prize for the best book published in the history of philosophy the previous year.

This year’s winner is Shelley Weinberg, associate professor of philosophy at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, for her book, Consciousness in Locke (published in 2016 by Oxford University Press).

The prize is $5000.

Here’s a description of the book from OUP’s site:

Shelley Weinberg argues that the idea of consciousness as a form of non-evaluative self-awareness runs through and helps to solve some of the thorniest issues in Locke’s philosophy: in his philosophical psychology and in his theories of knowledge, personal identity, and moral agency. Central to her account is that perceptions of ideas are complex mental states wherein consciousness is a constituent. Such an interpretation answers charges of inconsistency in Locke’s model of the mind and lends coherence to a puzzling aspect of Locke’s theory of knowledge: how we know individual things (particular ideas, ourselves, and external objects) when knowledge is defined as the perception of an agreement, or relation, of ideas. In each case, consciousness helps to forge the relation, resulting in a structurally integrated account of our knowledge of particulars fully consistent with the general definition. This model also explains how we achieve the unity of consciousness with past and future selves necessary for Locke’s accounts of moral responsibility and moral motivation. And with help from other of his metaphysical commitments, consciousness so interpreted allows Locke’s theory of personal identity to resist well-known accusations of circularity, failure of transitivity, and insufficiency for his theological and moral concerns. Although virtually every Locke scholar writes on at least some of these topics, the model of consciousness set forth here provides for an analysis all of these issues as bound together by a common thread.

Here’s a review of it at NDPR.

(via Debra Nails)


detail of cover art of Consciousness in Locke by Shelley Weinberg

The post JHP’s Best Book in the History of Philosophy Prize appeared first on Daily Nous.

Perfect for the Holidays! Order a Signed Copy of “Meet the Deplorables”

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 15/12/2017 - 5:28am in

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Blog, Book

I am now offering signed copies of “Meet the Deplorables” dedicated to you or anyone you want. It’s a beautiful, full-color hardback book I co-authored with Harmon Leon. He infiltrated weird alt-right organizations like the Minutemen; I did the political analysis and the cartoons. Click the button below:

Shipped Where?

United States $27.95 USDCanada or Mexico $33.95 USDOutside North America $42.95 USD

Want It Dedicated? To Whom?

P.S. Cover price is $27.95 and available at Indiebound, Amazon and Barnes & Noble, but unsigned of course.

Pre-Order “Meet the Deplorables” Now!

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 08/12/2017 - 3:19am in

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Image result for meet the deplorables ted rall harmon

My new book with Harmon Leon doesn’t come out until the 12th but you can pre-order it now!

Barnes and Noble: click here.

IndieBound: click here.

Amazon: TBA

I promise, if you’re into my stuff you’ll love Harmon’s writing and take on things too. This is a great collaboration.

FYI advance orders have a big impact on a book’s success, and thus are a big help. Also, think of the children! This makes a great holiday gift for the Trump hater or lover in your life.

My New Book Comes Out in 6 Days!

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 06/12/2017 - 4:23am in

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Image result for meet the deplorables ted rall harmon

So Harmon Leon is a friend, colleague, stand-up comic and, most famously, an infiltrator. He went undercover into weird alt-right spaces to get the dish about Trump America…and the results are hilarious! “Meet the Deplorables” includes Harmon’s infiltrations, my cartoons and my political analysis…and even some hope for the near future. Available December 12th. Order info available soon.

There will also be a book tour.

More info here.

A Call for Submissions

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 04/12/2017 - 5:09pm in

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Book

Image result for 32

We’re gearing up for our next issue of WHOTOPIA – Issue 32, and we’re sending out this call for submissions.

The theme for this issue is “Doctor Who Books”.

Doctor Who isn’t just about special effects, prosthetics and running down corridors. It’s also about ideas, and there are very few ways to make ideas explode in the mind that can match reading. Over the years there’s been a plethora of original fiction, reference, spin-off, charity, fan produced and more books. The vault on the subject of Doctor Who books is overflowing, and its an aspect that hasn’t been overwhelming covered by the fan press. We’re looking for material based on this theme, whether it be articles, opinion pieces, reviews, investigative reports, interviews, overviews, etc. The theme covers a vast array of material from the Target novels of the 1970s right up to today’s plethora of professional, semi-professional and self published books. So get your thinking caps on and start writing.

As we’ve said, articles can cover any aspect of published Doctor Who, Torchwood, Sarah Jane Adventures, Class and K-9.

Submitted material should be approximately in the 2500 word range. (If you feel this word count limits the scope of your piece, please feel free to contact Bob to make arrangements to submit longer material.)

Submissions Deadline is: January 27, 2018.

Completed material should be sent to bobf60@shaw.ca. And submitted in Microsoft Word format attached to your email.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us directly.

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