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I'm So Fortunate that Mitt Romney is Doing Me

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 17/08/2018 - 10:29pm in

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Whee. Space.

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Thu, 16/08/2018 - 10:37pm in

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Tick Biter

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 15/08/2018 - 10:22pm in

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The Cat Got Into Our Stash

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 14/08/2018 - 10:14pm in

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…and forgive them their debts

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 14/08/2018 - 8:15am in

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I’m very excited to announce that my next book, …and forgive them their debts: Lending, Foreclosure and Redemption — From Bronze Age Finance to the Jubilee Year (ISLET-Verlag Dresden), will officially release this coming November 13, 2018. The pre-order page on Amazon will be available soon, and I’ll make another announcement when that’s up.

In the meantime, you can learn more about the book below.

Michael

Copy for book description and advance praise:

…and forgive them their debts
Lending, Foreclosure and Redemption
From Bronze Age Finance to the Jubilee Year

In …and forgive them their debts, renowned professor of economics, Michael Hudson – and one of the few who could see the 2008 financial crisis coming – takes us on an epic journey through the economies of ancient civilizations. For the past 40 years in conjunction with the Harvard Peabody Museum, he and his colleagues have documented the archeological record and history of debt, and how societies have dealt with (or failed to deal with) the proliferation of debts that cannot be paid. In the pages of …and forgive them their debts, readers will discover shocking historical truths about how debt played a central role in shaping ancient societies. Perhaps most striking of all is that – in a nearly complete consensus of Assyriologists & biblical scholars – the Bible is preoccupied with debt, not sin.

In all eras – from antiquity to the present – debts have tended to mount up faster than the ability of most debtors to pay. That is a basic mathematical fact: Economic growth is arithmetic and can’t keep up with the exponential growth of debt growing at compound interest.

The big economic question is – and has always been – what will happen if debts cannot be paid? Will there be a debt writedown in favor of debtors (as has been done for large corporations), or will creditors be allowed to foreclose (as is always done on personal debtors and mortgage-holders), leading to their political takeover of the assets of the economy – and the government’s public sector?

The problem of debt backlogs was created with the invention of interest-bearing loans in agrarian 3rd Millennium BC Mesopotamia. The remedy of record was the royal Clean Slate proclamation or Jubilee Year of debt forgiveness. These proclamations had three functions: (1) They restored financial balance by annulling the backlog of crop debts that had accrued; (2) they liberated indebted bondservants (and their families); and (3) they restored land tenure rights, enabling debtors to continue living productively on the land, pay taxes, and be available for military service and corvée labor.

Clean Slate debt cancellations (the Jubilee Year), used in Babylonia since Hammurabi’s dynasty, first appear in the Bible in Leviticus 25. Jesus’s first sermon announced that he had come to proclaim it. This message – more than other religious claims – is what threatened his enemies, and why he was put to death.

This interpretation has been all but expunged from our contemporary understanding of the phrase, “…and forgive them their debts,” in The Lord’s Prayer. It has been changed to “…and forgive them their trespasses (or sins),” depending on the particular Christian tradition that influenced the translation from the Greek opheilēma/opheiletēs (debts/debtors). On the contrary, debt repayment has become sanctified and mystified as a way of moralizing claims on borrowers, allowing creditor elites and oligarchs the leverage to take over societies and privatize their public assets, especially in hard times.

Historically, no monarchy or government has survived takeover by creditor elites and oligarchs (viz: Rome). In a time of increasing economic and political polarization, and a global economy deeper in debt than at the height of the 2008 financial crisis, …and forgive them their debts shows what individuals, governments, and societies can learn from the ancient past for restoring economic and social stability today.

Advance praise

“Michael Hudson is surely the most innovative, and in my view, the most important economic historian of the last half century. This is the consummate product of 30 years of research on the history of a subject that could not be more important to our own situation today. We like to use the expression words “ancient history” as a code-word for “of no possible relevance to matters of consequence today.” This book clearly demonstrates that nothing could be further from the truth. If we don’t take heed, ancient history is likely to engulf us in ways that will shatter our complacency in the most disastrous of ways. Hudson is giving us a desperately needed warning, and we would do well to pay very close attention.” — David Graeber, Professor of Anthropology at the London School of Economics, author of the international bestseller Debt: The First 5,000 Years

“As someone in the leadership of the international Jubilee 2000 campaign, I have always believed that the Judaic and Christian principle of Jubilee – the periodic correction of economic imbalances – was a principle of social justice deeply embedded in the human psyche. Michael Hudson’s excavation of the ancient historical roots of the Jubilee, Sabbath or sabbatical principle, common to all the Abrahamic faiths, makes this book an essential read for those that want to deepen their understanding of the world’s great religions. His account of the evolution of creditor-debtor relationships, as well as of the development of the rate of interest in ancient Assyria makes this book of particular relevance to historians of western economic thought and practice. But above all, Hudson’s book reminds us that human history is littered with bitter struggles between debtors and their creditors, between the landed and the landless, and between workers and rentiers. And that the struggle continues.” — Ann Pettifor, Political Economist, Director of PRIME, Economic Adviser to Jeremy Corbyn and the British Labour Party

“Michael Hudson reveals the real meaning of “Forgive us our sins.” It has far more to do with throwing the moneylenders out of the Temple than today’s moneylenders would like you to know.” — Steve Keen, Economist, Head of the School of Economics, Politics, and History at Kingston University, Revere Award for Economics winner for being the economist who first and foremost cogently warned the world of the coming 2008 Global Financial Collapse

“Michael Hudson is the best economist in the world… Readers often ask me how they can learn economics. My answer is to spend many hours with Hudson’s books. You will understand economics better than any Nobel Prize-winning economist.” — Paul Craig Roberts, former under-secretary of the U.S. Treasury (Reagan Administration) and author of The Failure of Laissez Faire Capitalism and Economic Dissolution of the West

*** For media inquiries, please contact:
Paul Sliker
slikerpj@gmail.com
401-413-6344

Lethbridge Stewart: Scary Monsters

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sun, 12/08/2018 - 6:04am in

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 Candy Jar Books)Candy Jar Books have announced the next chapter in the adventures of Lethbridge-Stewart, Anne Travers, Bill Bishop and the men and women of the Fifth Operational Corps:

Lethbridge-Stewart: Scary Monsters
Written by Simon A Forward
Cover by Richard Young

1981: London, a bomb detonates in a London pub and Brigadier Alistair Lethbridge-Stewart is among the injured. Moscow, a hijacked plane sits on the airport runway and Major Grigoriy Bugayev leads the assault against the six gunmen holding the passengers hostage.

These are the triggers that set the two military men on an international manhunt. Their investigations converge and uncover a group of terrorists whose roots reach back to sinister Cold War experiments, and something that was unearthed in ancient ruins in the New Mexico desert by one Sophia Montilla… and Anne Travers.

Terror is a contagion. It means to spread. And humanity is set on doing everything in its power to help it...

Published at the end of August 2018, Scary Monsters opens the new Lethbridge-Stewart series of six-book celebrating fifty years of the Brigadier. And with it comes a brand-new look for the range.

The new design was the brain child of head of publishing Shaun Russell and Will Brooks, known for his work on Titan Comics’ Doctor Who range, as well merchandise for the latest series of Doctor Who. Shaun says:
Andy (Frankham-Allen, range editor) and I have been discussing rebranding the books for some time now, and it seemed the anniversary range was the perfect time. New cover design, new logo, and I knew just the man for the job. We had worked with Will previously. His covers for Philip Martin’s Gangsters and Peter George’s Pattern of Death were outstanding, and we knew he would create the right look for us. And he didn’t disappoint!

The artwork for Scary Monsters is by Lethbridge-Stewart artist Richard Young. He says:
This is my ninth cover for the Lethbridge-Stewart books, but the first one I've done as the lead book, so the stakes were raised for this. It's also the first cover to feature the Brig. I'd been pushing to feature him on a cover for years, and with this being the fiftieth anniversary of the character it felt like the time was right.

Andy Frankham-Allen explains the umbrella-title, The Laughing Gnome:
We took our cue from Life on Mars and its sequel series, Ashes to Ashes, and opted for another David Bowie title for our very first time travel series of books. But we didn’t want it just be a title – we decided that we’d make the Laughing Gnome an integral part of the story, the catalyst for our heroes’ adventures in time. I don’t wish to give away the conceit of the series, but the basic premise is thus: Sir Alistair is nearing the end of his life and has just buried another old friend. Feeling out of sorts, he is somewhat surprised to find himself in 1981. Some mysterious force has pulled him backwards in time, into his own past, an adventure he has only vague memories of! As the series progresses we discover that both Anne Travers and her husband, and popular series regular, Bill Bishop, have also been dragged through time. But why? What, or who, is behind it?”

The first book in the series, Scary Monsters, is by Simon A Forward, who penned the 2016 Lethbridge-Stewart novel, Blood of Atlantis:
To be asked once to write for the Lethbridge-Stewart range is fortunate. To be asked twice seems like - what are they thinking? Letting me loose to play with these favourite characters again. Madness. Initially, I thought, well okay, but only if the right idea struck. And the next day the right idea struck me. To make life more challenging, this time it was more than merely contributing to a range. For the Brigadier's big anniversary year, Candy Jar outlined an ambitious arc to frame these adventures.
Scary Monsters also forms something of a sequel to Blood of Atlantis, with the return of popular character Grigoriy Bugayev and Señora Sophia Montilla. But Simon is keen to stress there’s more to it than that:
This is more than your average jaunt down memory lane and it's about much more than introspection and reflection. My book sees the Brigadier and friends confronting terrorism in an international thriller that, while rooted in the past - and in the Doctor Who universe - should carry some resonance in the 21st century. And not just for the Brigadier.

Scary Monsters is now available for pre-order from Candy Jar Books. The book also forms part of any existing subscriptions to the range.

Doctor Who News

Arthur Machen – A Fragment of Life

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 10/08/2018 - 12:30am in

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Quiet around here of late. I just enjoyed an audiobook, The Great God Pan and Other Weird Tales, by Arthur Machen, narrated by Peter Wickham. (I got from Audible.) I recently read The Hill of Dreams and found it fairly astounding, so I wanted to revisit “The Great God Pan” and “The White People” (real classics, those two.) Some folks might object that the audiobook cuts out some of the episodic bits from The Three Imposters – “White Powder” and “Black Seal” – but that’s ok. They are stand-alone. But the one in the set that I really loved, that I never knew before, is “A Fragment of Life”. A novella. It’s one of those sad English clerk and wife experience strange mystic growth in the dreary London suburbs-type possibly-fairies affairs. “Darnell had received what is called a sound commercial education, and would therefore have found very great difficulty in putting into articulate speech any thought that was worth thinking; but he grew certain on these mornings that the ‘common sense’ which he had always heard exalted as man’s supremest faculty was, in all probability, the smallest and least-considered item in the equipment of an ant of average intelligence.” That’s sounds like a first line but really it’s from the middle and – how can I put it: it handles its own heavy-handed re-enchantment theme with such a wonderfully light touch. I enjoyed the gentle ride so vastly and enormously. How can I describe without telling it? It’s like Chesterton, but instead of bouncing around or standing on its head, or executing a fake-military about-face and marching into the sea, it just keeps sliding dreamily sideways, out of its own frame, scene by scene, small episode by episode. It builds in the slowest, strangest way. It doesn’t really build but, in the end, how could I possibly mind the odd spot where it leaves me? And having it read to me nicely, while I was doing some calm drawing? My brain feels so much better.

Arthur Machen fans in the audience tonight? Never read him? Probably you should start with “The Great God Pan”.

I Love Your Tiny Human head

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 07/08/2018 - 9:42pm in

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Corn Maze Sucks, and bonus.

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 01/08/2018 - 10:11pm in

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Doctor Who’s Steven Moffat Lands ‘The Time Traveler’s Wife’ Series Adaptation at HBO

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 01/08/2018 - 6:27am in

[Ed. Note: My bad, DOCTOR Who fans ;-) ]

While much of the attention over the past several months has been focused on the “original content smackdown” going on between Netflix, Amazon Prime, and Hulu (for example, check out the price tag on Amazon’s Lord of the Rings series), HBO has quietly been securing deals with some major names for some major projects – and that streak continues with a straight-to-series order for UK writer-producer Steven Moffat‘s (Doctor Who, Sherlock) adaptation of Audrey Niffenegger‘s novel “The Time Traveler’s Wife”.

Steven MoffatCredit: Gage Skidmore

“I read Audrey Niffenegger’s The Time Traveler’s Wife many years ago, and I fell in love with it. In fact, I wrote a Doctor Who episode called ‘The Girl In The Fireplace’ as a direct response to it. When, in her next novel, Audrey had a character watching that very episode, I realized she was probably on to me. All these years later, the chance to adapt the novel itself, is a dream come true. The brave new world of long form television is now ready for this kind of depth and complexity. It’s a story of happy ever after – but not necessarily in that order.” – Steven Moffat

time travelers wife series moffat hboCredit: MacAdam/Cage

Written by Moffat and based on Niffenegger’s best-selling 2003 novel, The Time Traveler’s Wife is described as an “intricate and magical love story about Clare and Henry, and a marriage with a problem: time travel.” Moffat, Sue Vertue, and Brian Minchin are set to executive produce through their Hartswood Films banner; with Warner Bros. Television co-producing.

“HBO is the perfect home to tell this incredible story with all the scale and space it needs, and we’re delighted to be working with Warner Bros to bring Steven’s thrilling vision of the novel to life.” – Hartswood Films (statement)

HBO‘s deal with Moffat is the third major competitive situation that the network has entered into and secured a series from this year. The cable giant peviously announced that they would be the home for JJ AbramsDemimonde and Joss Whedon’s The Nevers. With Game of Thrones ending its run in 2019 and the prequels still some time off, HBO is looking for another “tent pole” series that could garner the level of succes that Game of Thones has brought.

“We are thrilled to be partnering with Steven Moffat, Hartswood and WBTV on The Time Traveler’s Wife. Steven’s passion is evident in every project he’s written and we are certain that his love and respect for this mesmerizing and textured novel will make it a quintessential HBO series.” – Casey Bloys, President of Programming, HBO

This story was originally reported by Deadline Hollywood.

The post Doctor Who’s Steven Moffat Lands ‘The Time Traveler’s Wife’ Series Adaptation at HBO appeared first on Bleeding Cool News And Rumors.

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