reviews

Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 19/02/2018 - 11:17pm in

Once again, here’s the weekly report of what’s new at some useful online philosophy resources.

We check the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (SEP), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy (IEP), Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews (NDPR), 1000-Word Philosophy, and occasionally some other sites for updates and report them right here.

If you think there are other regularly updated sites we should add to this feature, feel free to suggest them in the comments.

SEP

New:

Revised:

  1. Computing and Moral Responsibility, by Merel Noorman (Virginia).
  2. Personal Autonomy, by Sarah Buss (Michigan)  and Andrea Westlund (Western Michigan).
  3. Gilles Deleuze, by Daniel Smith (Purdue) and John Protevi (Louisiana State).
  4. Giacomo Zabarella, by Heikki Mikkeli (Helsinki).
  5. Japanese Confucian Philosophy, by John Tucker (East Carolina).
  6. Louis Althusser, by William Lewis (Skidmore College).
  7. Karl Leonhard Reinhold, by Dan Breazeale (Kentucky).

IEP  

1000-Word Philosophy

NDPR

  1. Krzysztof Ziarek (Buffalo) reviews Using Words and Things: Language and Philosophy of Technology (Routledge) by Mark Coeckelbergh.
  2. Sam Fleischacker (llinois-Chicago) reviews Kant and the Scottish Enlightenment (Routledge) by Elizabeth Robinson and Chris W. Surprenant (eds.).
  3. Daniel Z. Korman (California-Santa Barbara) reviews Ontology Without Borders (Oxford) by Jody Azzouni.
  4. Pascal Engel (Ecole des Hautes Ètudes en Sciences Sociales) reviews Donald Davidson’s Triangulation Argument, A Philosophical Inquiry (Routledge) by Robert H. Myers and Claudine Verheggen.
  5. Geoffrey Scarre (Durham) reviews Corporal Punishment: A Philosophical Assessment (Routledge) by Patrick Lenta.
  6. Caroline T. Arruda (Texas-El Paso) reviews Communities of Respect: Grounding Responsibility, Authority, and Dignity (Oxford) by Bennett W. Helm.
  7. Daniel Stoljar (Australian National) reviews Consciousness and Fundamental Reality (Oxford) by Philip Goff.

Compiled by Michael Glawson (University of South Carolina)

 

The post Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update appeared first on Daily Nous.

Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 12/02/2018 - 10:06pm in

Here’s the weekly report of what’s new at some useful online philosophy resources.

We check the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (SEP), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy (IEP), Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews (NDPR), 1000-Word Philosophy, and occasionally some other sites for updates and report them right here.

If you think there are other regularly updated sites we should add to this feature, feel free to suggest them in the comments.

SEP

New:

  1. Simon of Faversham, by Ana María Mora-Márquez (Götesborgs).
  2. Philo of Alexandria, by Carlos Lévy (Sorbonne (Paris IV)).
  3. Levels of Organization in Biology, by Markus I. Eronen (Groningen) and Daniel Stephen Brooks (Münster).

Revised:

  1. Francis Herbert Bradley’s Moral and Political Philosophy, by David Crossley (Saskatchewan).
  2. Chance versus Randomness, by Antony Eagle (Adelaide).
  3. Gertrude Elizabeth Margaret Anscombe, by Julia Driver (Washington-St. Louis).
  4. John Austin, by Brian Bix (Minnesota).
  5. Redistribution, by Christian Barry (Australian National).
  6. Value Pluralism, by Elinor Mason (Edinburgh).
  7. Robert Desgabets, by Patricia Easton (Claremont).
  8. Antoine Le Grand, by Patricia Easton (Claremont).
  9. The Kochen-Specker Theorem, by Carsten Held (Erfurt).
  10. Johann Gottlieb Fichte, by Dan Breazeale (Kentucky).
  11. Socrates, by Debra Nails (Michigan State).
  12. Plato on utopia, by Chris Bobonich (Stanford) and Katherine Meadows (Stanford).

IEP  

1000-Word Philosophy

  1. Nietzsche and the Death of God, by Justin Remhof (Old Dominion).

NDPR

  1. Yuval Avnur (Scripps College) reviews Science and Religion in Wittgenstein’s Fly-Bottle (Bloomsbury), by Tim Labron.
  2. Mark Okrent (Bates College) reviews Background Practices: Essays on the Understanding of Being (Oxford), by Hubert L. Dreyfus.
  3. Simon Blackburn (Cambridge) reviews Philosophical Provocations: 55 Short Essays (MIT), by Colin McGinn.
  4. Andrew Vincent (Cardiff University) reviews British Idealism and the Concept of the Self (Palgrave Macmillan), by W.J. Mander and Stamatoula Panagakou (eds.).
  5. Michael Kühler (University of Twente) reviews What Is Ethically Demanded?, K. E. Løgstrup’s Philosophy of Moral Life (Notre Dame), by Hans Fink and Robert Stern (eds.).
  6. Craig DeLancey (SUNY Oswego) reviews Living with Robots (Harvard), by Paul Dumouchel and Luisa Damiano.
  7. Luc Brisson (Centre Jean Pépin (CNRS)) reviews Plotinus (Routledge), by Eyjólfur K. Emilsson.

BONUS: “All paradoxes can be resolved by stupid bullshit

Compiled by Michael Glawson (University of South Carolina)

 

The post Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update appeared first on Daily Nous.

Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 05/02/2018 - 11:06pm in

Here’s the weekly report of what’s new at some useful online philosophy resources.

We check the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (SEP), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy (IEP), Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews (NDPR), 1000-Word Philosophy, and occasionally some other sites for updates and report them right here.

If you think there are other regularly updated sites we should add to this feature, feel free to suggest them in the comments.

SEP

New:

  1. Śrīharṣa, by Nilanjan Das (NYU-Shanghai).

Revised:

  1. Lucrezia Marinella, by Marguerite Deslauriers (McGill).
  2. Proof-Theoretic Semantics, by Peter Schroeder-Heister (Tuebingen).
  3. Wittgenstein’s Philosophy of Mathematics, by Victor Rodych (Lethbridge).
  4. Leibniz’s Influence on Kant, by Catherine Wilson (York).
  5. Delusion, by Lisa Bortolotti (Birmingham).
  6. Propositions, by Matthew McGrath (Missouri) and Devin Frank (Illinois).

 

IEP

  1. Paulo Freire, by Kim Díaz (El Paso Community College).
  2. Maurice Blanchot, by Joseph Kuzma (Colorado-Colorado Springs).

 

NDPR

  1. Ralf M. Bader (Merton College-Oxford) reviews Significance and System: Essays on Kant’s Ethics (Oxford), by Mark Timmons.
  2. Joseph Mai (Clemson) reviews Trust in the World: A Philosophy of Film (Routledge), by Josef Früchtl.
  3. Jonathan Anomaly (Arizona) reviews Pharmaceutical Freedom: Why Patients Have a Right to Self-Medicate (Oxford), by Jessica Flanigan.
  4. Jonathan Ichikawa (British Columbia) reviews Epistemic Contextualism: A Defense (Oxford), by Peter Baumann.
  5. Sandra Shapshay (Indiana-Bloomington) reviews Weltschmerz: Pessimism in German Philosophy, 1860-190 (Oxford), by Frederick C. Beiser.
  6. Robert C. Koons (Texas-Austin) reviews Unbelievable Errors: An Error Theory about All Normative Judgments (Oxford), by Bart Streumer.
  7. Richard Kraut (Northwestern) reviews Ethics in the Conflicts of Modernity: An Essay on Desire, Practical Reasoning and Narrative (Cambridge), by Alasdair MacIntyre.

 

1000-Word Philosophy

  1. Plato’s Form of the Good, by Ryan Jenkins (Cal Tech-San Luis Obispo).

 

BONUS: Consistency.

Compiled by Michael Glawson (University of South Carolina)

 

The post Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update appeared first on Daily Nous.

Until They Inevitably Find and Kill Each Other

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sat, 03/02/2018 - 6:00am in

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reviews, Video


What has changed, two decades on, is the thrust of these games. There has been, in video-game sports as in the culture at large, an astonishing administrative bloat. The first time I noticed the shift was in playing GameDay 2000, a basic NFL simulator. Sure, you could play an NFL game, watch the tightly-packed polygonal men glitch through one another, watch the victory dances to buttrock anthems. But GameDay also let you start a franchise. Now, instead of calling plays and moving small men around, you were the GM. The game let you simulate entire seasons, no longer bothering with the incidental back-and-forth of moving a ball across a field, but playing football on a world-historic level. In the offseason you would trade and draft new players, based on stats generated by the computer, new rookies with computer-generated names populating your team, until your Chicago Bears were unrecognizable, the year was 2020, and your franchise had won the past decade of Super Bowl rings.

Simple, Open Pleasure in a New Landscape

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 30/01/2018 - 3:30am in

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reviews


In the central gallery housing Hockney’s drawings is a crayon portrait from 1974 of Andy Warhol, looking frail and a little lonely on a stuffed green chair in Paris. A comparison between the two artists, who were friends, is instructive. The parallels are clear: both gay, blond icons of Pop art, both protégés of Henry Geldzahler, both sons of working class parents, both prolific and witty writers. But here the similarities end, and the two artists begin to seem like inversions of each other. After the initial erotic frenzy of his work from the 1960s, the sexuality in Hockney’s art largely retreated behind discreet visual conventions; sex in Warhol was comparatively hardcore, particularly in his films. Likewise, the theme of death is explicit in Warhol and circumspect in Hockney. Warhol’s narrative voice is arch and elusive, willfully blank; Hockney’s direct and incisive, and at times, almost doggedly earnest. But the most striking zone of commonality and difference has to do with the way the two artists treated the issue of mechanical reproduction.

The Kids Aren’t Alright

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 29/01/2018 - 8:12pm in

A crucial new work of generational analysis explores how society turned millennials into human capital.

Dangerous, hackneyed rubbish: don’t watch Romper Stomper

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 24/01/2018 - 5:21pm in

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reviews

There is a lot wrong with the new adaptation of Romper Stomper, but the worst part is its fanciful and dangerous representation of anti-fascists, and Muslim and African youths.

The six part series is partly a story about contemporary Australian fascism and its anti-Muslim obsession. A new generation of Nazis are connected to the original set of thugs from the 1992 film through a rather contrived plot, and some returning cast members.

At the centre of the film is a group of Nazis, Patriot Blue, quite obviously modelled on the real life United Patriots Front, and, as the promotional material explains, their conflict with “their anti-fascist counterparts”, Antifash. The show deliberately equates the violence of Nazis with those who resist them.

This is especially troublesome because the series wants to be realistic, and it uses real world events as motors for the plot. The first scene centres on a protest by Patriot Blue outside a Halal food festival, mirroring a real life protest in Sydney in 2016 (the show is set in Melbourne). But it is Patriot Blue who end up viciously beaten—by Antifash. Muslims end up injured not by Nazis but by the melee that ensues between left and right: a very unsubtle metaphor.

Whatever the strategic nous of punching Nazis, nothing remotely like this has happened during the actual anti-racist counter-rallies against the far right in Australia that the show aims to portray. A few episodes later, Antifash set upon the funeral of the former leader of Patriot Blue, Blake, armed with weapons. This too is miles from reality.

At another point, a group of young Africans are harassed by the Nazis. A few scenes later they have kidnapped one of the Nazis and are torturing him with a Stanley knife in the back of a van. While the Australian media hypes up a pretend South Sudanese crime wave in Melbourne, this portrayal is downright irresponsible. It also seems to have nothing to do with the plot.

In another scene, a young Muslim boxer gets into a fight in a car park that leaves his white opponent nearly dead. This spurs Patriot Blue to wild violence. The implication is that the hatred is “spiralling”; and in some way, the young Muslims share the blame.

Sometimes the series gets its realism right. David Wenham is great as Jago Zorick, an Andrew Bolt-like TV shock jock whose heroes are his friends the fascist brutes. He tricks outspoken young Muslim Laila into appearing on his show alongside Blake, and then demands she apologise on behalf of all Muslims for all acts of terror, a racist public shaming that recalls the experience of people like Yassmin Abdel-Magied. But then Laila just becomes a pawn, played by both sides.

Resistance to Nazism and racism is portrayed as just as problematic and morally dubious as those who idolise Hitler.

Even worse, perhaps, is that this isn’t really a TV show about racism or Nazis. Romper Stomper uses the clash between fascists and anti-fascists as background in a hackneyed psychological story about a rising young Nazi, Kane, whose primary motive in winning Patriot Blue’s leadership seems to be hatred for his mother. The characterisations are painfully two-dimensional, and the dialogue is so unnatural at times that serious scenes end up verging on comical.

When the state and politicians play a role—there is a nonsensical plot that revolves around an Immigration bill and a crossbencher quite obviously modelled on Nick Xenophon—it is as if they are just being strung along by the contest between far left and far right.

Racism comes from the top

The small fascist groups in Australia are dangerous, but whatever their fantasies, they are not leading the charge. The sewers that Australian Nazis swim in have been constructed by years of racist mainstream policy and discourse.

Wave after wave of anti-terror legislation alongside cultivated panics about “death cults” have created an environment where extreme anti-Muslim hate is given oxygen, and where the far right has more confidence to actively attack Muslims and other minorities. The Islamophobia Register has documented hundreds of hate crimes; their stats show that 70 per cent of victims are women and 30 per cent of attacks have happened in front of children.
R
The original film was rightly criticised for its romanticisation of Nazis. The TV show gives the oppressed groups and anti-fascists more airtime, but it does so with sparing empathy and context. Perhaps this is no accident. Speaking to The Australian, director Geoffrey Wright echoed the racist concerns of his main characters: “We are at a point in the West, amid significant waves of immigration, where we are asking: what do we stand for? What do we want? And how do groups contribute to the West, to our society in a meaningful way?”

One good thing about Romper Stomper is the paywall—it’s only available on Stan. Hopefully that means less people watching it.

By Amy Thomas

Romper Stomper
Directed by Geoffrey Wright, Daina Reid and James Napier Robertson
Streaming on Stan

The post Dangerous, hackneyed rubbish: don’t watch Romper Stomper appeared first on Solidarity Online.

The Passions of Max Eastman

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 08/01/2018 - 8:20pm in

One of “the hottest of radicals” of the early twentieth century, Max Eastman is now largely left out of the pantheon of the left. Can we still learn from this idiosyncratic editor today?

Nevertheless, She Persisted

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 08/01/2018 - 8:16pm in

Set on and around the New York City waterfront, Jennifer Egan’s new novel Manhattan Beach offers a feminism suited to the “lean in” age.

Age of Emancipation

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 08/01/2018 - 8:08pm in

One of France’s most influential contemporary thinkers, Marcel Gauchet manages to craft a compelling historical account of half a millennium, exploring how we arrived at today’s crisis—and how we might get out.

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