Private Medicine and the Demand for the Privatisation of State Medical Care

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 17/12/2019 - 11:02pm in

The book Health Reform: Public Success – Private Failure also makes it clear where the demands for NHS and the privatisation of other systems of state healthcare come from: the private medical sector, including the insurance industry. The book states

Arguments for private markets in health care are not only persistent, and resistant to both analysis and evidence, but they also come forward from the same groups of people. Again over the decades, and across countries, one finds the same arguments for private organization and funding coming from spokesmen for private practitioners’ associations – physicians, dentists, pharmacists – as well as from private insurance companies and drug manufacturers. In addition they tend to come, as noted above, from representatives of ‘business’ and, more recently, from ‘ideological entrepreneurs’ that support themselves and their organisations by championing the interests of the wealthy, cheerleading for the private marketplace. Indeed, they are simply taking advantage of the general ideological climate, currently more favourable to re-open old issues. (p. 28).

‘Ideological entrepreneurs’ seems to be another term for right-wing thinktanks and astroturf pressure groups.

The book states that in contrast with hospital workers, who want to see cheap or free medical treatment provided to the poorest, the private sector is interested in maximising its income.

Hospital workers, whose patients/clients tend to be very ill and/or have very limited resources – the unhealthy and unwealthy – are generally very supportive of public payment systems. Their opportunities in a private marketplace would be quite limited. But they do not support hospital ‘downsizing’ or containment more generally; the ideal policy would be more money from public sources, to hire more highly trained and better paid staff….

The loud voices for privatisation, by contrast, come from those who believe that they could do better, in the form of increased sales of or higher prices for their products and services, in a more entrepreneurial environment. It is not clear how many, if any, of these would support a truly private system, with no direct or indirect contribution of public funds. The economic mayhem among providers would be truly awesome. Instead what seems to be contemplated is a continuation of public support on a large scale, but without limits on private fee setting or delivery, or private insurance – rather like the United States, in fact, before more widespread ‘managed care’. 

This sounds very much like the thinking behind the privatisation of NHS services – private healthcare providers supported by the state – and Trump’s intention to open up the NHS to American private healthcare firms and remove the NHS’ price fixing mechanism keeping drug prices as low as possible.

NHS privatisation is all about private profit, not public care or the provision of health services at minimal cost. Don’t fall for the rhetoric of the Tories or Blairites in Labour. Get rid of it, and them.