anarchism

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Strength in Smallness

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 21/07/2021 - 6:09pm in

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An Anarchist response to “A Heritage of Smallness” by Nick Joaquin by Carolus Plebejus. You can read the original article here.

Unity is more easily achieved if people have more interests shared, if they are more aligned than opposed, and they can comfortably identify with it. This is easily achieved through small groups. To force such unity will only make matters worse, and bickering wouldn’t stop anyway.

Carolus Plebejus

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Entrevista a Xuân Rayne: Vietnamita, anarquista, trabajadora sexual

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Thu, 15/07/2021 - 7:56am in

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Entrevistamos a Xuân Rayne, una anarquista vietnamita y trabajadora sexual no binaria afincada en Estados Unidos, para que nos explique la intersección de sus identidades, los caminos de la solidaridad internacional entre los trabajadores del sexo y cómo los trabajadores en general pueden estar con los trabajadores del sexo.
Xuân utiliza cualquier/todos los pronombres.
A translation of our interview with Xuân Rayne into Spanish. Translated by Grupo Anarquista Aurora.

Es necesario comprender que el Estado es la fuente clave de la explotación. No puede ser la solución a la misma.

Xuân Rayne

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Phỏng vấn Xuân Rayne: người lao động tình dục vô trị người Việt

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 06/07/2021 - 4:46am in

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Nhân ngày Quốc tế Người Lao động Tình dục 2/6, Mèo Mun đã phỏng vấn Xuân Rayne — một người vô trị và lao động tình dục phi nhị nguyên giới (non-binary) gốc Việt hiện đang sống tại Mỹ. Qua bài phỏng vấn này, chúng mình muốn tìm hiểu góc nhìn của Xuân về sự giao thoa của những danh tính này, về con đường cho tình đoàn kết giữa những người lao động tình dục trên toàn thế giới, và cách người lao động trong các ngành nghề khác có thể đấu tranh cùng người lao động tình dục. Xuân dùng mọi đại từ nhân xưng (anh ấy/cô ấy/bạn ấy). (English original).

Mọi người cần nhận thức được rằng: chính phủ là nguồn gốc của sự bóc lột chứ không thể trở thành giải pháp cho sự bóc lột.

Xuân Rayne

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Celebrating Independence Day Anew as Anarchists and Libertarians

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 21/06/2021 - 3:47pm in

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The 12th of June and A New Independence

Written by Malaginoo.

Independence is the reason why we wake up and fight every day, to advance and secure our lives, our fortunes, and our honor as individuals and as a people brought together by mutual care and assistance.

Malaginoo

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Ano ang Mali sa Estado?

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 21/06/2021 - 3:22pm in

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Mula sa mga nais umaklas. Inilathala ni Aklas.

Kailanman, saanman, hindi monopolyo ang sagot. Wag sumunod sa mga gustong mamuno sa’tin. Kung interes lang din ang pag-uusapan, mas interesado kami sa kalayaan ng lahat ng lipunan. Hindi nila kayang hulihin tayong lahat.

Mula sa mga nais umaklas

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Entretien avec Xuân Rayne, travailleur du sexe vietnamien et anarchiste

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sun, 13/06/2021 - 3:50am in

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Nous avons interviewé Xuân Rayne, un anarchiste vietnamien et un travailleur du sexe non binaire basé aux États-Unis, pour connaître leurs points de vue sur l'intersection de leurs identités, les voies de la solidarité internationale entre les travailleurs du sexe et la façon dont les travailleurs en général peuvent se tenir aux côtés des travailleurs du sexe. Xuân utilise tous les pronoms.
A translation of our interview with Xuân Rayne into French. Translated by Al Raven.

Il faut comprendre que l'État est la principale source d'exploitation. Il ne peut pas être la solution à ce problème.

Xuân Rayne

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Interview with Xuân Rayne: Vietnamese, Anarchist, Sex Worker

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 02/06/2021 - 3:39pm in

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We interviewed Xuân Rayne, a Vietnamese anarchist and non-binary sex worker based in the United States for their insights into the intersection of their identities, the paths for international solidarity among sex workers, and how workers in general can stand with sex workers. Xuân uses any/all pronouns. 

There needs to be an understanding that the state is the key source of exploitation. It cannot be the solution to it.

Xuân Rayne

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Book on Anti-Capitalism

Simon Tormey, Anti-Capitalism: A Beginner’s Guide (London: One World, revised edition 2013).

Like many people, I’ve been doing some reading during the lockdown. I found this in one of the mail order book catalogues I get, and ordered it as it looked interesting. I got through the post the other day. It was first published in 2004 and was republished in a revised edition nine years later. The blurb for it on the back runs

The financial crisis, bank bailouts, and the dash to austerity have breathed new life into protest movements across the globe, and brought anti-capitalist ideas into the mainstream. But what does it mean to be anti-capitalist? And where is anti-capitalism going – if anywhere?

Simon Tormey explores these questions and more in the only accessible introduction to the full spectrum of anti-capitalist ideas and politics. With nuance and verve, he introduces the reader to the wide variety of positions and groups that make up the movement, including anarchists, Marxists, autonomists, environmentalists, and more. Providing essential global and historical context, Tormey takes us from the 1968 upsurge of radical politics to the 1994 Zapatista insurrection, the 1999 Seattle protests, and right up to Occupy and the uprisings across the Eurozone.

This is a fascinating and bold exploration of how to understand the world – and how to change it.

A biographical note states that Tormey is a political theorist based in the School of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Sydney. He was the founding director of the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice at the University of Nottingham.

The book has an introduction and the following chapters:

  1. The Hows and Whys of Capitalism
  2. Anti-Capitalism after the ‘End of History’
  3. A ‘movement of movements’1: ‘reformism’, or ‘globalisation with a human face’
  4. A ‘movement of movements’ II: renegades, radicals and revolutionaries
  5. The Future(s) of Anti-Capitalism: Problems and Perspectives

There is a timeline of contemporary anti-capitalism, a glossary of key terms, thinkers and movements, and a list of resources.

Although the book was published eight years ago, I think it’s still going to be very relevant. The world may have been in lockdown for the past year with governments supporting their economies, but the Tories have neither gone away nor changed their stripes. It’s been pointed out that they never let a crisis go to waste. Once the lockdown is lifted, they’ll revert back to cutting the welfare state, privatising the NHS and with further attacks on workers’ rights, increasing job insecurity and lowering wages. We will need to organise again and resist them. The book’s short at 181 pages, excluding the index, but it looks like a very useful and necessary contribution to combating neoliberalism and the poverty and misery it is inflicting on working people across the globe.

Alex Belfield on the Rejection of the Attempt to Found a Political Party

I’m sorry for posting it, but this video by the mad right-wing YouTuber and internet radio host Alex Belfield is interesting for what it says about the murky state of certain sections of Black politics and activism in the UK. The video dates from February last year, 2020, and shows Belfield celebrating the rejection by the Electoral Commission of an application by a group of anonymous individuals wishing to found a Black Lives Matter political party. This was made five months prior to the Electoral Commission’s final decision, following the death of George Floyd. The Commission turned the application down because it was likely to mislead voters. The official BLM organisation, now the Black Liberation Movement, denied that it was associated with the applicants. The manifesto did not describe the party’s structure or organisation and the party’s application left its structure and financial organisation incomplete. The application was also made by anonymous individuals, which also raises justifiable suspicions.

The application to establish a BLM party allowed Tory backbenchers to accuse Black Lives Matter of being a party political organisation with left-wing objectives. One was the destruction of the traditional family, the other was to have the police defunded.

Belfield also notes that this comes after various individuals in America have been sent down for embezzling donations to BLM across the Pond. The UK branch have also been denounced by smirking abomination Priti Patel and Sajid Javid. They also caused riots that have left hundreds of police officers injured. Belfield states, in my view absolutely correctly, that if they were White they’d be compared to the BNP, EDL or other Fascist organisation. But they are considered acceptable to the media because they are Black. Belfield says of all this that ‘there are shenanigans afoot’ that make him very afraid.

Belfield is an arch-Tory with a very toxic political bias. He wants the NHS privatised, or at least handed over wholesale to private management despite all the evidence showing that the health service’s problems are the result of privatisation and underfunding by the Tories. He believes that Colston’s statue shouldn’t have been torn down, and condemns other moves to removes or rename other monuments and institutions with connections to the slave trade or the British Empire. He hates Sadiq Khan and has instead promoted Laurence Fox and other right-wing rivals. His videos are full of sneers and invective against ‘left-wing oyster-eating, Guardian-reading, ambivalecious Naga Manchushy types’. Because he’s in some kind of very nasty dispute with the Beeb, which he’d like to defund, and obviously hates those presenters he views as left-wing, like Naga Manchetty.

But unfortunately here has a point. I think there are some very nasty shenanigans and corruption within certain parts of Black politics. And that this is not confined to the left.

The book Back from the Brink, published a decade ago, describes how the Tory party was brought back from the edge of political extinction by David ‘Dodgy Dave’ Cameron and the mass murderer of the disabled and unemployed, Iain Duncan Smith. Apparently, it describes how the Tories tried to build up a constituency within the Black community by recruiting certain ‘community leaders. Many of these turned out to be criminals, who ended up being sent to the slammer rather than parliament.

On the other side of the political spectrum, I’ve heard of members of anarchist groups leaving the movement after they noticed members of various drug gangs appearing at meetings. I also remember how there was so much corruption in Brent and Lambeth councils in the 1980s that they were hardly out of the pages of Private Eye’s ‘Rotten Boroughs’ column. The magazine even gave Brent the nickname ‘Bent’, just as it called Merseyside ‘Murkyside’ for the same reasons. And some of the organisations involved in the corruption were Black.

Now I am certainly not claiming that corruption and embezzlement is confined to the Black community, or that it is even prevalent within it.

You can see simply by opening the papers that isn’t the case. But where there is poverty, despair and marginalisation, whatever the colour or ethnicity of the community, you will also find crime. And criminals will seek an entrance into politics for legitimation and also to allow their activities to expand and continue without interference by the law. Hence the scandals way back in the ’70s or ’80 about corruption in the Met, and allegations since then that certain coppers have been taking bribes from criminal gangs to look the other way. And an organisation like Black Lives Matter, which has received considerable amounts of money from donations and has a radical antipathy towards the police, will be an attractive target for criminals.

It must, however, be noted that the group that wanted to found the Black Lives Matter political party weren’t connected to the proper, official Black Lives Matter movement. They are also not connected to Sasha Johnson’s wretched Taking the Initiative Party.

The Groan has published a piece about Sasha Johnson’s shooting. Apparently it was when she was coming back from a party at 3 AM Sunday morning. At the moment they’re working on the assumption that she may have been shot in mistake for someone else and that her political activism was not a motive. They also urge people not to speculate about the motives for her murder.

I dare say they’re right, though hanging over their request for people to refrain from speculating is the spectre of terrible race riots if someone comes to the unfounded conclusion that the attacker was racially motivated.

But it does seem to me that if her political organisations and activism is investigated, it might turn up some very unsavoury dealings or connections.

Sasha Johnson: BLM activist may have been shot by mistake (msn.com)

The Fight for Partial Freedom in Vietnam

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sun, 02/05/2021 - 3:27pm in

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Western leftists, communists, and anarchists alike routinely call for “unity” with the authoritarian oppressors in their favourite “socialist” states. They value a cheap, doom to end in failure unity with the statists, the genocide deniers, the red fascists, more than the well-being and liberation of marginalised groups.

If anarchists abandon the countless small fights for partial freedom in our showdown for total liberation, then we have already failed our most marginalised and oppressed, and our revolution is not worthy.

Mèo Mun

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