Book

Arab Humanist: The Necessity of Basic Income

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 30/08/2019 - 5:59pm in

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Arab World, Book, Women

Nohad A Nassif recently self-published her first book “Arab Humanist: The Necessity of Basic Income“. It is an unashamedly autobiographical story, which talks about how she ran away from her family while living in Austin, Texas, and what happened to her when she became homeless. The book contains story art and commentary sections on Basic Income. Nohad believes that everyone

Book announcement: Financing Basic Income

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Thu, 29/08/2019 - 3:10am in

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Book, Canada

This new book from Richard Pereira (and contributors Albert Jörimann (BIEN Switzerland) and Gary Flomenhoft (University of Vermont)) argues that basic income at a decent level is, in fact, affordable. The contributors approach the topic from the perspectives of three different countries — Canada, Switzerland, and Australia — to overcome objections that a universal program to keep all citizens above

Most Popular Book Week Costume “The Super Competitive Mum Who Has To Be Best At Everything”

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 19/08/2019 - 8:08am in

Mums

Characters from the best selling children’s book “The Super Competitive Mum Who Has To Be Best At Everything” are once again the most popular choice of costume for Book Week.

“We’re expecting to see heaps of students turning up dressed as The Kid Whose Mum Owns A Top Of The Line Sewing Machine and The Kid Whose Dad Reckons There Must Be A Book Version Of The Spiderman Movie So That’s What You’re Wearing,” said Daisy Letraset, sixth class teacher at Penshurst North Primary School. “I’m still hoping to see someone dressed up as an old favourite like That Nerdy Kid Who Actually Enjoys Going To The Library And Foolishly Made Their Own Costume.”

“Book Week is important because it encourages kids to look at books in a new light, specifically as another means to prove their superiority over their less popular classmates,” said headmaster Paul Chalkdust. “It’s great to see kids who’ve never picked up a book before discovering that books can be used to bring down further humiliation upon those kids whose parents aren’t very good at craft work.”

“Book Week always leads to great sales for my book “The Kid Who Only Told His Parents The Night Before That Book Week Is On And Has To Make Something Out Of Pool Noodles”,” said children’s book author Sally Blurb. “I’m already working on the sequel, “Spotlight Only Has A Pirate Costume Left, There Must Be A Book With A Pirate Character In It”, which I hope to have in all good book shops by next year.”

Peter Green
http://www.twitter.com/Greeny_Peter

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New book: “The Future of Work, Technology, and Basic Income”

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Thu, 18/07/2019 - 9:27pm in

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Book, Technology, work

In this new book, work, technology and society are discussed through a series of view points, given by several authors (e.g.: Matt Zwolinski, Michael Cholbi, Andrea Veltman, Evelyn Forget, among others). Universal Basic Income is a policy described at the center of this crucial societal challenge, analyzed by the authors in its wide implications. Michael Cholbi and Michael Weber are

PhilPapers Publishes Its First Book

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Thu, 27/06/2019 - 2:14am in

In a move that may signal disruptive changes to academic philosophy publishing, PhilPapers, the free, massive, online philosophy database, has published its first book—an open-access edited collection.

It’s The Open Handbook of Formal Epistemology, edited by Richard Pettigrew (Bristol) and Jonathan Weisberg (Toronto), and it features the following contributions:

Weisberg, who was one of the creators of the open-access philosophy journal, Ergo, and who suggested the idea of the book to the PhilPapers, says that a second edition of the book may include more articles.

In a post about the book at his site, Weisberg writes: “For me personally, a central aim of this project was to demonstrate a point about open access publishing and shared standards. The budget for this book was exactly $0.00, and this was only possible because we didn’t need a human typesetter.” This was possible because “Pretty much everyone in formal epistemology uses the same, standardized format to do their writing. And that format plugs in to a high-quality, freely available typesetting program.”

He thinks there’s a lesson here: “The moral is that philosophers in general should settle on a similar standard (all academics, really). If we did, we’d have a lot more freedom from commercial publishers. We could publish open access books like this on the regular. The books would be freely and easily available to all, and authors would retain copyright.”

At the moment, according to David Chalmers (NYU), one of the founders of PhilPapers, there are no other books in the organization’s pipeline, but, he says, “we’re definitely open to doing more.”

The book is available for download here.

(via Jonathan Weisberg)

Related: “The Open Logic Text

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The post PhilPapers Publishes Its First Book appeared first on Daily Nous.

An Experiment in Philosophy and Poetry (guest post by Aaron Meskin)

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 24/04/2019 - 9:53pm in

Imagine the following: you write an academic paper in philosophy, a poet then writes a poem about your paper, and then you respond to the poet. 

That’s the intriguing idea that philosopher Aaron Meskin and poet Helen Mort have made real with their forthcoming volume, Opposite: Poems, Philosophy & Coffee. In the following guest post,* Professor Meskin (currently at Leeds, but soon moving to the University of Georgia) explains how the book came about and shares an excerpt from the introduction and one of Dr. Mort’s poems.


Clive Head, “The Synaptical Cubist Orders for Two”

An Experiment in Philosophy and Poetry
by Aaron Meskin

The British poet, Helen Mort, and I recently explored a novel way in which poetry and philosophy might be in dialogue. We put together a book, Opposite: Poems, Philosophy & Coffee, which is just about to be published by Valley Press, an independent publisher located in Scarborough, UK.

The core of the book comprises ten poems composed by Helen in response to her reading of ten recent essays in philosophical aesthetics which I suggested. The main criterion for selection was a suspicion that Helen would find the paper interesting. The philosophers (Jeanette Bicknell, Eva Dadlez, Anne Eaton, John Dyck, Cynthia Freeland, Sherri Irvin, Eileen John, Thi Nguyen, Nick Riggle, Jon Robson, me) then briefly respond to Helen’s poems. An introduction explains the genesis of the work, and two codas reflect on the relationships between coffee, philosophy and poetry.

Topics addressed in the book include bad art, itches, meals, oversinging, portraits, rock climbing, street art, tastimony, tattoos and a song by Belle and Sebastian. We’re really excited by the way it turned out.

Why coffee? We hatched the plan for the bookshop in a local cafe conveniently located opposite the University of Leeds where we both worked when we met. The first poem that Helen wrote—the piece that gave us the idea for the project—was set in another of our favorite Leeds coffee places, and it responds to a co-authored paper of mine which addresses the epistemology of taste. And the whole project was based on the idea that the book might be like a cafe (or bar) conversation between a poet and a philosopher (or ten).

All the royalties from the book are going to support a Leeds charity which addresses childhood hunger. To order it, go here.

Here’s an excerpt—the first bit is a piece from the introduction where Helen talks about her process, and then there’s a poem by Helen prompted by her reading of Eileen John’s “Meals, Art and Artistic Value” (originally published online and open access in Estetika), along with Eileen’s response. You can read the abstract of Eileen’s paper and download a complete copy of it here. To read Helen’s response to Eva Dadlez’s work on the art of tattoos, mentioned in the excerpt from the introduction below, along with Eva’s response, you’ll have to get the book.

From the Introduction (by Helen Mort)

 I was excited and inspired by the papers Aaron had begun to send to me, particularly Eva Dadlez’s work on the status of tattoos as works of art. As I began to try to write poems in response, I sometimes got a little weighed down by the idea of trying to make my creative responses ‘hold’ or contain some of the theory explored so eloquently in the papers. In short, I was trying to make them too directly philosophical. The resulting pieces were abstract and seemed dead on the page. When I returned to Eva’s paper for another read, I decided to try a different approach and react to her consideration of tattooing-as-art by creating my own version of a portrait, a sketch (in words) of famous tattooed lady Betty Broadbent. This response was much more tangential than the pieces I’d tried previously and freed me up to react to the theories and proposals I was encountering in a looser way. I couldn’t hope to paraphrase the philosophers I’d been reading, nor should I try. This needed to be a dialogue, a sprawling conversation, the kind you might have in a bar late at night.

“Learning to Eat”
Helen Mort

Learning to eat again
is like learning to run
down a mountainside,
I mean really run, your
legs freewheeling,
your ribs bright spokes
in your chest. It’s like
learning to fall asleep
in someone else’s arms,
or like that exercise in art
class where you don’t
look down at the page
until the end to see
the bulbous, lovely
shapes you’ve made.
I have acquired the
language of colour
and shade. I have
renounced the minimalism
of Ryvita and apple peel.
I have abandoned
the expressionism
of meat-rind in the plant pots
potatoes hidden in pockets
sponge pudding pushed
around the bowl. So,
when you place a dish
of mackerel down
in front of me on our first
meal together, I see
the jewelled detail
of blackberries, the sweep
of buttered mash,
the texture of kale.
I say this is a masterpiece
and mean it, then
you arrange each
artful item
on the plate
and together
we demolish it.

 

“Mash, Mackerel, Masterpiece”
by Eileen John

This poem makes me really happy. It is remarkable to me that Helen Mort could make such a beautiful, flowing, moving leap from my earnest attempt to write about meals and artistic value. Her poem does the thing that I love but do not understand about poetry, as it packs more into its forty-one short lines than can fit into pages and pages of a philosophical essay. Let me try to talk about what that ‘more’ is.

Her title is “Learning to Eat”, and the first line is “Learning to eat again”. This is a hook for me right away, because I do not think of eating as something I learned to do or would have to relearn. But that thought has changed by the end of the poem. The first simile given to tell us about learning to eat again, that it “is like learning to run / down a mountainside”, is a great image of bodily freedom and almost tumbling downhill motion—but the mystery of the hook is still there. Why do we need to learn this? Can’t we just let gravity and the mountainside have their way with us? But with that vivid motion in mind, you can remember that although it is in a way natural and hard not to do, it is also not exactly easy to do. It takes coordination and concentration and being ready to adjust at a moment’s notice. The poem brings out how eating does and does not “come naturally” to us. We will eat somehow or other, if there is food available, but we will not inevitably eat in a way that has the freedom, energy and finely adjusting, coordinating ease that can be had. We may have to learn it, and part of what the poem does is make that project bigger or deeper than I made it.

I was trying to say that in having meals, though we are not constituting works of art—roughly because meals resist the pointed purpose and integrity of art—we can do things with artistic value. That value involves “taking reflective charge” of possibilities for goodness. This poem takes charge in that way: as I am trying to say here, I could not have seen the possibilities for goodness that happen in this poem. It does this in part by making the “masterpiece” of a meal be a matter of people meaning that it be so to each other. Maybe this is a deft, heartening argument against my claim—if so, I don’t mind! In the vocabulary of the poem, that we learn to eat well, perhaps happily demolishing a dish of buttered mash and mackerel together, seems to be hard and easy. It is not only a matter of artistic value; it takes openness to what people are, as bodily, artful, moving, learning beings.

Related: Who called it “Experimenting with Coffee” instead of “X-phresso”?Poetry and Philosophical Thinking; Philosopher PoetsPhilosophy’s Exclusion of Literary WritingsPhilosophy & Literary Writings Revisited

The post An Experiment in Philosophy and Poetry (guest post by Aaron Meskin) appeared first on Daily Nous.

DWM Special Edition 52: Costume Design

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sat, 20/04/2019 - 3:26am in

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Book, DWM

 Costume DesignFew television programmes make the same production demands as Doctor Who. With such diverse settings as distant points in Earth’s history and alien civilisations in the far future, the series has always stretched the ingenuity – and resources – of its talented costume designers.

 The latest Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition features numerous rare and previously unpublished illustrations showing how the look of an episode evolves from sketch to screen, plus exclusive interviews with the following designers:

  • Lee Bender (owner of the Bus Stop boutique, which supplied outfits for Sarah Jane Smith)
  • Howard Burden (designer of the Twelfth Doctor’s costume)
  • Ray Holman (designer of the Eleventh and Thirteenth Doctor’s costumes, and Doctor Who’s current costume designer)
  • June Hudson (designer of the Fourth Doctor’s final outfit and numerous costumes for Romana) 
  • Barbara Lane (The Claws of Axos, The Dæmons, The Curse of Peladon etc)
  • Amy Roberts (Image of the Fendahl, Full Circle, The Keeper of Traken etc)
  • Alexandra Tynan (The Tenth Planet, The Highlanders, The Evil of the Daleks etc)
  • Lucinda Wright (designer of Christopher Eccleston’s series as the Ninth Doctor) 

 Plus, the stars who wore the designers’ creations look back at their characters’ clothes:

  • Sophie Aldred (Ace)
  • Camille Coduri (Jackie Tyler)
  • Katy Manning (Jo Grant)
  • Catrin Stewart (Jenny Flint)
  • Anneke Wills (Polly) 

Editor Marcus Hearn says:I don’t think there’s ever been such a detailed and comprehensive look at the series’ costume design. Much of the new research for this issue was led by Piers Britton, who has an unrivalled knowledge of the subject and the kind of insight that makes you look at familiar episodes in a whole new light. Dr Britton looms large in this issue, but the whole team has done a fantastic job – other highlights include a rarely seen interview with the late Colin Lavers, who designed the Fifth Doctor’s costume, and a new interview with Barbara Lane. This is the first time Barbara has spoken about her work on the series since the mid-1970s, so we were delighted when we tracked her down. We’ve uncovered so much new information and so many fantastic images – we can’t wait to share it all with everyone! On sale from Thursday 18 April 2019 £5.99 (UK)

Doctor Who News

Book on Alain Locke Wins Pulitzer Prize

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 16/04/2019 - 10:42pm in

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award, Book

A book on philosopher Alain Locke has won the 2019 Pulitzer Prize for Biography.

The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke by Jeffrey C. Stewart (University of California, Santa Barbara) presents “a panoramic view of the personal trials and artistic triumphs of the father of the Harlem Renaissance and the movement he inspired.”

Alain Locke, born in 1885, went to college at Harvard and then became the first African-American Rhodes Scholar, studying philosophy at Oxford. He then returned to Harvard for his PhD, and taught for much of his career at Howard University. He was a theorist and critic of art and literature, and a philosopher specializing in ethics, race, culture, and aesthetics.

Professor Stewart’s book won the National Book Award for Nonfiction last year.

The post Book on Alain Locke Wins Pulitzer Prize appeared first on Daily Nous.

The Unofficial Dr Who Annual 1972

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sat, 30/03/2019 - 8:06pm in

The Unofficial Dr Who Annual 1972It’s taken more than 47 years but Doctor Who fans finally have an annual for 1972 – with stars from the show among the contributors.

Manchester-based World Distributors began publishing the official Doctor Who annuals in autumn 1965, continuing until 1985, but elected not to bring one out in 1971. This left countless fans puzzled, disappointed – and with a niggling gap in their collections and on their bookshelves.

However, Mark Worgan – a long-time fan of the series and the annuals – was determined to do something about it and this star-studded, fan-produced, non-profit- making homage is the result.

He has published The Unofficial Dr Who Annual 1972, which transports readers TARDIS-like back to the very early 1970s when Jon Pertwee had just finished his second series in the title role and the show was mostly Earth-bound, with the Doctor assisting the military organisation UNIT as its scientific adviser.

A whole host of star names from the show signed up for the project, including Katy Manning, who played companion Jo Grant, John Levene (Sgt Benton) and Richard Franklin (Capt Yates) – the surviving members of what became affectionately known as “the UNIT family”.

They and the large number of Doctor Who fan writers and artists have been joined by visual effects wizard, model unit supervisor and author Mike Tucker plus renowned artist Alister Pearson and Wayne Howarth – the son of Walter Howarth, who was the main illustrator on some of the original annuals.

And this is a truly bumper edition. The official annual for 1971 offered 96 pages, while the 1973 annual had 80 pages, but this one comes in at a whopping 184 pages!

The project was launched in September 2017, with people working on it in their spare time for free, and the hardback annual is packed with stories, puzzles, features and emulating and evoking the style, tone and quirkiness of the 1970s annuals, which were allowed a freer rein as regards their relationship to the programme than those later in the run.

Mark said:
It’s been hard work for everybody but I’m beyond delighted to be bringing this out, especially as 2019 is the centenary year of Jon Pertwee’s birth. The annual means a great deal to me. I was particularly thrilled to get all the surviving UNIT family on board for the annual, and I’ve been knocked out by the enthusiasm and talent of the contributors.

In 1971, when the official annual would have been published, the Doctor had been forced into exile on Earth by his people, the Time Lords, but the series’ production team still managed to take the show away from the confines of this planet and I was keen to do the same in the annual. The challenge was laid down and the contributors rose to it in style, so we’ve got a great balance of adventures in space and time.

The official 1972 annual may well have been lost in the time vortex – like the Doctor himself has been known to – but we hope fans agree that our version makes up for it and is worth the long wait.

Well, what’s 47 years to a Time Lord anyway . . . ? So, that’s 1972 taken care of. But what of the years 1987 to 1989 for which – once again – no official annuals were forthcoming despite the show still being made, before it was cancelled until its one-off return in 1996, which was its last outing of the classic era?

There’s been a terrific amount of interest in this project, including a great many calls to complete the run of annuals for the classic era, so I’m pleased to say that I’m now going to be turning my attention to an unofficial annual for 1987. After that, who knows?! Contributors and proofreaders, as well as an administrator for the Facebook page, are now being sought for The Unofficial Dr Who Annual 1987. Please contact Mark via doctorwhoannual@aol.co.uk if you're interested in taking part.

The Unofficial Dr Who Annual 1972 is published by Terraqueous Distributors and available from Lulu at the print-on-demand price of £39.20 plus shipping costs (NB: VAT is not payable on books).

None of the money paid by purchasers goes to the publisher or to any of the contributors. Visit the website to order the annual.

Doctor Who News

InHabit: People, Places and Possessions

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 10/05/2017 - 9:45pm in

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Literature, Book

Book at Lunchtime Seminar held on May 3rd 2017.

Pages