book reviews

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Black Power Afterlives: The Enduring Significance of the Black Panther Party - book review

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 23/10/2020 - 4:12am in

Black Power Afterlives provides a range of views on the Black Panther Party, some of which hint at what a revival of the radical core of the Party could mean, argues Yonas Makoni

Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 19/10/2020 - 7:00pm in

The weekly report on new and revised entries in online philosophy resources and new reviews of philosophy books…

SEP

New:  ∅

Revised:

  1. Facts, by Kevin Mulligan and Fabrice Correia.
  2. Charles Hartshorne, by Dan Dombrowski.
  3. Model Theory, by Wilfrid Hodges.
  4. Walter Benjamin, by Peter Osborne and Matthew Charles.
  5. The Free Rider Problem, by Russell Hardin and Garrett Cullity.
  6. Russell’s Paradox, by Andrew David Irvine and Harry Deutsch.
  7. Ibn Sina’s Natural Philosophy, by Jon McGinnis.
  8. Aristotle’s Psychology, by Christopher Shields.

IEP   ∅

NDPR

  1. The Emotional Mind: A Control Theory of Affective States by Tom Cochrane, reviewed by Colin Klein.
  2. The Epistemic Role of Consciousness by Declan Smithies, reviewed by Robert J. Howell.
  3. Consequentialism: New Directions, New Problems edited by Christian Seidel, reviewed by David Cummiskey.
  4. Heraclitus Redux: Technological Infrastructures and Scientific Change by Joseph C. Pitt, reviewed by Matthew D. Lund.
  5. Moral Knowledge by Sarah McGrath, reviewed by David Phillips.
  6. The Phenomenal Basis of Intentionality by Angela Medelovici, reviewed by Adam Pautz

Wireless Philosophy  ∅

1000-Word Philosophy  ∅

Recent Philosophy Book Reviews in Non-Academic Media

  1. Grandstanding: The Use and Abuse of Moral Talk by Justin Tosi and Brandon Warmke, reviewed by Adam Szetela at Los Angeles Review of Books.
  2. The Murder of Professor Schlick by David Edmonds, reviewed by Adam Kirsch at The New Yorker, and by Gary Saul Morson at The American Scholar.
  3. Time of the Magicians: The Invention of Modern Thought, 1919-29 by Wolfram Ellenberger, (trans. Shaun Whiteside), reviewed by David Motadel at the Times Literary Supplement.

Compiled by Michael Glawson

BONUS: When empathy and agreement come apart.

The post Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update appeared first on Daily Nous.

9 Recommended Lockdown Reads from the LSE Community

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sun, 18/10/2020 - 7:50pm in

During the COVID-19 pandemic, many of us have been turning to books for information, for entertainment, for distraction and to look after our wellbeing – whether new finds, childhood favourites or books that have been lingering on the shelf for years. In this reading list, nine members of the LSE community recommend books that they’ve … Continued

There would have been no Corbynism without Corbyn: a review of This Land

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 16/10/2020 - 5:39am in

While This Land offers an insight into Corbyn's leadership, Owen Jones draws the wrong lessons to be learned, argues Shabbir Lakha

Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 12/10/2020 - 6:00pm in

The weekly report on new and revised entries in online philosophy resources and new reviews of philosophy books…

SEP

New:  ∅

Revised:

  1. Decision Theory, by Katie Steele and H. Orri Stefánsson.
  2. Kant’s View of the Mind and Consciousness of Self, by Andrew Brook and Julian Wuerth.
  3. Abilities, by John Maier.
  4. Anthony Collins, by William Uzgalis.
  5. Philosophy of Liberation, by Eduardo Mendieta.
  6. Chinese Philosophy and Chinese Medicine, by Lisa Raphals.
  7. Science and Chinese Philosophy, by Lisa Raphals.
  8. Locke’s Political Philosophy, by Alex Tuckness.
  9. Henry More, by John Henry.
  10. Feminist Perspectives on Sex Markets, by Laurie Shrage.
  11. School of Names, by Chris Fraser.

IEP   ∅

NDPR  

Wireless Philosophy  ∅

1000-Word Philosophy

  1. Philosophy, by Thomas Metcalf.

Recent Philosophy Book Reviews in Non-Academic Media

  1. An Event, Perhaps: A Biography of Jacques Derrida by Peter Salmon, reviewed by Julian Baggini, at Prospect Magazine.
  2. W.E.B. Du Bois: The Lost and the Found by Elvira Basevuch, reviewed at 360 Magazine.
  3. Think Like a Feminist: The Philosophy Behind the Revolution by Carol Hay, reviewed by Jane Haile at the New York Journal of Books.
  4. Machiavelli: The Art of Teaching People What To Fear, by Patrick Boucheron, and Machiavelli: His Life and Times, by Alexander Lee, reviewed by Tim Parks at The New York Review of Books.
  5. Think Least of Death and Spinoza: A Life by Steven Nadler, reviewed by Jeffrey Collins at The Wall Street Journal (may be paywalled)

Compiled by Michael Glawson

BONUS: The danger of backwards induction.

 

 

 

The post Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update appeared first on Daily Nous.

Book Review: Critical Affect: The Politics of Method by Ashley Barnwell

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sun, 11/10/2020 - 7:55pm in

Tags 

book reviews

This review originally appeared on LSE Review of Books. If you would like to contribute to the series, please contact the managing editor of LSE Review of Books, Dr Rosemary Deller, at lsereviewofbooks@lse.ac.uk In Critical Affect: The Politics of Method, Ashley Barnwell challenges the clear-cut separation of critical and affective approaches, examining how longstanding ideas of critique and criticism are … Continued

First They Took Rome: How the Populist Right Conquered Italy - book review

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 09/10/2020 - 5:47am in

David Broder’s account of how Italy was captured by the racist right shows the general danger of social-democratic parties collapsing into neoliberalism, argues Chris Bambery

Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 05/10/2020 - 10:29pm in

The weekly report on new and revised entries in online philosophy resources and new reviews of philosophy books…

SEP

New:  ∅

Revised:

  1. Petrus Ramus, by Erland Sellberg.
  2. Hegel’s Dialectics, by Julie E. Maybee.
  3. Peter Damian, by Toivo J. Holopainen.
  4. Michel Henry, by Frédéric Seyler.
  5. Jayarāśi, by Piotr Balcerowicz.
  6. Meaning Holism, by Henry Jackman.
  7. Wilhelm Dilthey, by Rudolf Makkreel.
  8. Speech Acts, by Mitchell Green.
  9. Theophrastus, by Katerina Ierodiakonou.
  10. Desert, by Fred Feldman and Brad Skow.
  11. Mohism, by Chris Fraser.

IEP   ∅

NDPR

  1. Matthew A. Benton reviews Disagreement, Deference, and Religious Commitment (Oxford), by John Pittard.
  2. Kimberly Kessler Ferzan reviews Self-Defense, Necessity, and Punishment: A Philosophical Analysis (Routledge), by Uwe Steinhoff.
  3. Samuel Freeman reviews In the Shadow of Justice: Postwar Liberalism and the Remaking of Political Philosophy (Princeton), by Katrina Forrester.

Wireless Philosophy

1000-Word Philosophy

  1. Is Death Bad? Epicurus and Lucretius on the Fear of Death, by Frederik Kaufman.

Recent Philosophy Book Reviews in Non-Academic Media

  1. The Knowledge Machine: How Irrationality Created Modern Science by Michael Strevens, reviewed by Joshua Rothman in The New Yorker.
  2. Entitled by Kate Manne, reviewed by by Nesrine Malik in The Guardian, Sophie McBain in The New Statesman, and Oliver Traldi in ARC Digital (Manne replies to the latter here.)
  3. The Murder of Professor Schlick: The Rise and Fall of the Vienna Circle by David Edmonds, reviewed by Thomas Filbin at The Arts Fuse.
  4. A Field Guide to a Happy Life by Massimo Pigliucci, reviewed by Michael L. Ramsey at The Roanoke Times.

Compiled by Michael Glawson

The post Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update appeared first on Daily Nous.

Book Review: Data Feminism by Catherine D’Ignazio and Lauren F. Klein

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sun, 04/10/2020 - 7:00pm in

  This review originally appeared on LSE Review of Books. If you would like to contribute to the series, please contact the managing editor of LSE Review of Books, Dr Rosemary Deller, at lsereviewofbooks@lse.ac.uk   In Data Feminism, Catherine D’Ignazio and Lauren F. Klein use an intersectional feminist lens to examine unequal power structures in the realm of data, and … Continued

Shakespeare in a Divided America - book review

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Thu, 01/10/2020 - 11:27pm in

Shapiro’s writing on Shakespeare remains fascinating and insightful, but Julius Caesar in the age of Trump reveals the weaknesses of a liberal perspective, argues Dominic Alexander

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