book reviews

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Radical Seattle: The General Strike of 1919 - book review

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 21/08/2020 - 5:43am in

Winslow’s Radical Seattle tells an important story of workers’ militancy in the US very well, but questions of political strategy also need to be addressed, argues John Westmoreland

Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 17/08/2020 - 10:42pm in

Here’s the report on new and revised entries in online philosophy resources and new reviews of philosophy books. (This edition covers the past two weeks.)

SEP

New:

  1. Emergent Properties, by Timothy O’Connor.
  2. Philosophy of Microbiology, by Maureen A. O’Malley and Emily C. Parke.

Revised:

  1. Decision-Making Capacity, by Louis C. Charland and Jennifer Hawkins.
  2. Bohr’s Correspondence Principle, by Alisa Bokulich and Peter Bokulich.
  3. Quantum Mechanics, by Jenann Ismael.
  4. Empirical Approaches to Moral Character, by Christian B. Miller.
  5. Search Engines and Ethics, by Herman Tavani.
  6. Trust, by Carolyn McLeod.
  7. Quantum Field Theory, by Meinard Kuhlmann.
  8. Justice as a Virtue, by Mark LeBar.
  9. Measurement in Science, by Eran Tal.
  10. Emily Elizabeth Constance Jones, by Gary Ostertag.
  11. Antiochus of Ascalon, by James Allen.
  12. Comparative Philosophy: Chinese and Western, by David Wong.

IEP  ∅

NDPR

  1. Angela Mendelovici reviews The Value of Emotions for Knowledge (Palgrave Macmillan), by Laura Candiotto (ed.).

Wireless Philosophy

1000-Word Philosophy ∅

Recent Philosophy Book Reviews in Non-Academic Media ∅

  1. Entitled: How Male Privilege Hurts Women, by Kate Manne, reviewed by Jennifer Szalai at The New York Times and Nora Caplan-Bricker at The New Yorker.
  2. Time of the Magicians, by Wolfram Eilenberger, reviewed by Jonathan Rée at The Guardian.
  3. Conversations with René Girard, by Cynthia L. Haven (ed.), reviewed by Chris Fleming at the Los Angeles Review of Books.

Compiled by Michael Glawson.

BONUS: The odds of consciousness.

The post Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update appeared first on Daily Nous.

Keenie Meenie: The British Mercenaries Who Got Away with War Crimes - book review

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Thu, 13/08/2020 - 11:04pm in

Keenie Meenie exposes, with thorough research, the activities of a booming, highly lucrative outsourced industry, and its intimate ties with the British State, finds Susan Ram

Empire of Borders: The Expansion of the US Border Around the World - book review

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Thu, 06/08/2020 - 7:41pm in

Todd Miller, on US imperialism extending its border-policing worldwide, has particular relevance as the violence turns inevitably inward, finds Richard Allday

Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 04/08/2020 - 10:25pm in

The report on new and revised entries in online philosophy resources and new reviews of philosophy books…

SEP

New:

Revised:

  1. Proclus, by Christoph Helmig and Carlos Steel.
  2. Retributive Justice, by Alec Walen.
  3. Combining Logics, by Walter Carnielli and Marcelo Esteban Coniglio.
  4. Martin Buber, by Michael Zank and Zachary Braiterman.
  5. Immanuel Kant, by Michael Rohlf.

IEP 

  1. Associationism in the Philosophy of Mind, by Mike Dacey.

NDPR

Wireless Philosophy

1000-Word Philosophy

Al-Ghazālī’s Dream Argument, by John Ramsey.

Recent Philosophy Book Reviews in Non-Academic Media

  1. The Meaning of Travel: Philosophers Abroad by Emily Thomas, reviewed by Andrew Irwin at Times Literary Supplement.
  2. Who Needs a World View? by Raymond Geuss, reviewed by Kieran Setiya at the Los Angeles Review of Books.
  3. Reconstructing Democracy: How Citizens Are Building from the Ground Up by Charles Taylor, Patrizia Nanz and Madeleine Beaubien Taylor, reviewed by Scott McLemee at Inside Higher Ed.
  4. Letters and Other Texts by Gilles Deleuze, edited by David Lapoujade and translated by Ames Hodges, reviewed by Andrew Marzoni in The Nation.

Compiled by Michael Glawson.

The post Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update appeared first on Daily Nous.

Beyond the Blockade: Education in Cuba - book review

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 31/07/2020 - 12:48am in

Beyond the Blockade: Education in Cuba shows how a country with scarce resources, under an economic blockade, can build an excellent education system, finds Orlando Hill

Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 27/07/2020 - 9:14pm in

The report on new and revised entries in online philosophy resources and new reviews of philosophy books…

(This post covers the past two weeks.)

SEP

New:

  1. Luther’s Influence on Philosophy, by Robert Stern.
  2. Martin Luther, by Robert Stern.
  3. Divine Revelation, by Mats Wahlberg.

Revised:

  1. Wilfrid Sellars, by Willem deVries.
  2. al-Farabi, by Therese-Anne Druart.
  3. George Santayana, by Herman Saatkamp and Martin Coleman.
  4. James of Viterbo, by Antoine Côté.
  5. Isaiah Berlin, by Joshua Cherniss and Henry Hardy.
  6. Ontological Dependence, by Tuomas E. Tahko and E. Jonathan Lowe.
  7. Natural Theology and Natural Religion, by Andrew Chignell and Derk Pereboom.
  8. The Ergodic Hierarchy, by Roman Frigg, Joseph Berkovitz, and Fred Kronz.
  9. Jonathan Edwards, by William Wainwright.
  10. 18th Century German Aesthetics, by Paul Guyer.
  11. Ayn Rand, by Neera K. Badhwar and Roderick T. Long.

IEP 

  1. The Philosophy of Climate Science, by Richard Bradley, Roman Frigg, Katie Steele, Erica Thompson, and Charlotte Werndl.

NDPR

Wireless Philosophy

1000-Word Philosophy

  1. Epistemic Injustice, by Huzeyfe Demirtas.

Recent Philosophy Book Reviews in Non-Academic Media

  1. The Force of Non-Violence by Judith Butler, reviewed by Mark Trecka at the Los Angeles Review of Books and by Faisal Devji at the Los Angeles Review of Books.
  2. Philosopher of the Heart: The Restless Life of Søren Kierkegaard by Clare Carlisle, reviewed by Justin Taylor at Bookforum and by Morten Høi Jensen at The American Interest.
  3. The Knowledge Machine: How Irrationality Created Modern Science by Michael Strevens, reviewed at Publisher’s Weekly.

Compiled by Michael Glawson.

BONUS: Theorizing

The post Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update appeared first on Daily Nous.

Capitalist Realism in North Korea

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 27/07/2020 - 5:43pm in

image/jpeg icon9780804844390.jpg

A look at the memoirs of Felix Abt, arguably the most successful foreign capitalist to live and do business in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea to date.

The op-ed echoed Kim Il Sung’s principle that all North Koreans should get their daily rice and meat soup for free. The most influential paper, the Rodong Sinmun, lamented in December 2010 that North Korea hadn’t met the goal.

Felix Abt

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The Cadfael Mystery Novels

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 24/07/2020 - 6:35am in

Tags 

book reviews

Recently, I’ve been reading a fair bit of fiction, generally a book a day, and for the last week and a bit it’s been the Brother Cadfael novels by Ellis Peters.

Cadfael’s a monk in southwestern England in the late 12th century. He was a crusader before he made his vows, and as the monastery’s herbalist and healer, he gets out and about a lot more than most monks. Somehow, in the tradition of non-police detective novels, he becomes involved in a murder during every novel. There is also always at least one romance, and often two.

These are definitely what is known in the trade as cozies. Some bad things may happen, but everything will be put to right by the end of the novels; indeed, not just right, but better. Sometimes the murderer, if their murder is one we can sympathize with, is even let go.

Despite being set mostly during a civil war complete with burnings of entire towns, there’s a sunlit feel to these books; Cadfael is a lovely man, his friends are good people we can admire and even feel affection for, and the books have no excessive nastiness. Although they take place in the Middle Ages, they have virtually no misogyny, misandry, or misanthropy.

The actual murder plots vary. Sometimes what’s going on is obvious, a few times I haven’t figured it out before the reveal. The writing isn’t stellar, but it’s better than the norm for these sorts of novels.

Something else I particularly like about these books is that Cadfael is a believer. He’s not a closet atheist or agnostic, he’s not a hypocrite who’s a monk who doesn’t believe. I find that in too many books about religious believers in the past, the author clearly is not a believer and projects that into the character in a rather modern and anachronistic way.

Most people did believe, and a monk who took orders as an adult who didn’t believe would be a sad fellow indeed. (This is irrespective of the fact that I don’t believe.)

At any rate, I’ve enjoyed them a great deal. They are,  indeed, cozy, and a fine way to spend a few hours with fictional friends in a world where you know that even if the big events are bad, the events close to Cadfael will work out.

If that’s your cup of tea, or the medicine you’d like right now, highly recommended.

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More Than a Left Foot - book review

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 24/07/2020 - 5:13am in

Bob Williams-Findlay’s account of a lifetime’s involvement in the disabled people’s movement and left activism impresses fellow campaigner, Judy Hunt

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