book reviews

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Green shoots: the best books to inspire hope for the planet

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 22/07/2020 - 3:29am in

This review of books to inspire a green transformation appeared in The Guardian on 18 July, 2020.

Everyday life has been upended by the pandemic, but the Arctic heatwave is a reminder that the climate crisis still poses an urgent threat to humanity. We will need resolve, ambition and optimism as we emerge from lockdown, so we can forge the green recovery that is so crucial. One book that has sustained my faith in the future is Herman E Daly and John B Cobb’s hopeful vision, For the Common Good. Daly, once (briefly) the World Bank’s chief environmentalist, is an advocate of the steady state economy, central to the Green New Deal. This book is as relevant today as when it was first published, more than 30 years ago.

JA Baker’s 1967 memoir The Peregrine, is another vision – of the ecstatic joy brought on by a deep connectedness to nature. Baker documents his daily and increasingly close connection to the austere Essex landscape that was his home, and to what Gerard Manley Hopkins called “the brute beauty and valour” of an extraordinary bird. For greater understanding of how connected all living things are, Peter Wohlleben’s The Secret Network of Nature is less intense, but startling and delightful. Each chapter is a self-contained exploration of some link in nature: “How Earthworms Control Wild Boar”; “Fairy Tales, Myths and Species Diversity”. Or try Lev Parikian’s witty Into the Tangled Bank. He starts with the wildlife found in your kitchen sink, and gradually deepens connections to nature within and outside your own four walls.

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Isabella Tree’s memoir Wilding is a story of the human and financial costs of adaptation and transformation, but also a revelatory unfolding of nature’s return to what had become an increasingly sterile, conventional Sussex family farm. The book plunges readers into a fierce debate, pitching the closed-canopy forest theory of Britain’s ecological past against Dutch ecologist Frans Vera’s open landscape theory of “a mosaic of grassland, scrubland, groves and solitary trees, grazed by large numbers of herbivores”. The clincher is the oak, Tree argues, which does not regenerate in closed-canopy forests and is “standing proof that temperate zone Europe could not have been entirely closed forest”.

The Green New Deal is about system change – a struggle to subordinate the power of Wall Street and the City to the interests of society and the ecosystem. A book that inspires me to believe such a transformation possible is The Money Makers – historian Eric Rauchway’s 2015 account of how Roosevelt dismantled the privatised global financial system. On the night of his inauguration, Roosevelt began the process of ending the gold standard, by stripping Wall Street of private authority over the system, and restoring democratic, public authority. As Henry Morgenthau, then the US treasury secretary, wrote: “We moved the financial capital from London and Wall Street right to my desk at the Treasury.”

Just as in our time, the US in 1933 was confronted by an ecological disaster: the dust bowl. It’s an environmental tragedy central to John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath, written while the author benefited from a New Deal federal arts grant. Neil M Maher’s 2007 Nature’s New Deal tells the forgotten history of the New Deal’s attempt to green the American south. There was much that was downright wrong about Roosevelt’s racial and gender-segregated Civilian Conservation Corps. But Nature’s New Deal shows how we can chart a path out of the current crisis that leads to a future in which we can all flourish.

The Case for the Green New Deal by Ann Pettifor is published by Verso (£12.99). To order a copy go to guardianbookshop.com. Delivery charges may apply.

Book Review: Learning and Using Languages in Ethnographic Research edited by Robert Gibb, Annabel Tremlett and Julien Danero Iglesias

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sun, 19/07/2020 - 7:30pm in

In Learning and Using Languages in Ethnographic Research, editors Robert Gibb, Annabel Tremlett and Julien Danero Iglesias bring together contributors to explore issues that researchers may encounter when learning and using another language in ethnographic fieldwork. Providing readers with a set of accessible accounts of language learning and use, the collection aims to demystify language … Continued

Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 13/07/2020 - 9:18pm in

The weekly report on new and revised entries in online philosophy resources and new reviews of philosophy books…

SEP

New:

  1. Moral Responsibility and the Principle of Alternative Possibilities, by David Robb.
  2. Evolution and Development, by Jan Baedke and Scott F. Gilbert.

Revised:

  1. Identity Politics, by Cressida Heyes
  2. Philosophy of Psychiatry, by Dominic Murphy
  3. Public Health Ethics, by Ruth Faden, Justin Bernstein, and Sirine Shebaya.
  4. Carneades, by James Allen.
  5. Bodily Awareness, by Frédérique de Vignemont.
  6. Aristotle’s Metaphysics, by S. Marc Cohen.

IEP 

  1. Causation, by Alex Boradbent.

NDPR

Wireless Philosophy

1000-Word Philosophy ∅

Recent Philosophy Book Reviews in Non-Academic Media ∅

  1. Pyrrho’s Way: The Ancient Greek Version of Buddhism, by Douglas C. Bates, reviewed by Susan Miller at San Francisco Book Review.
  2. Smellosophy, by Ann-Sophie Barwich, reviewed by Mike Jay at The Wall Street Journal.
  3. The Meaning of Travel, by Emily Thomas, reviewed by Tunku Varadarajan, at The Wall Street Journal.

Compiled by Michael Glawson.

BONUS: Acceptable risk.

The post Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update appeared first on Daily Nous.

20 Dictators Currently Supported by the U.S. - book review

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 10/07/2020 - 1:10am in

David Swanson, 20 Dictators provides robust evidence that the claims for US foreign policy are contradicted by its behaviour, argue Phil Armstrong and Catherine Armstrong

Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 06/07/2020 - 10:36pm in

Here’s the report on new and revised entries in online philosophy resources and new reviews of philosophy books.

SEP

New:

Revised:

  1. Collingwood’s Aesthetics, by Gary Kemp.

IEP 

  1. Kit Fine, by Mike Raven (Victoria).

NDPR

  1. Philosophers LLC. reviews Au Revoir, by Anastasia Gutting.
  2. Jeff McMahan (Oxford) reviews The Quality of Life: Aristotle Revised (Oxford), by Richard Kraut.
  3. Scott Soames (Southern California) reviews Frege’s Detour: An Essay on Meaning, Reference, and Truth (Oxford), by John Perry.

Wireless Philosophy

1000-Word Philosophy

  1. Ethics and the Expected Consequences of Voting, by Thomas Metcalf (Spring Hill College).

Compiled by Michael Glawson.

The post Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update appeared first on Daily Nous.

Snowden’s Box: Trust in the Age of Surveillance - book review

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 03/07/2020 - 3:17am in

The story of Snowden’s whistleblowing reveals the importance of genuinely free journalism, but only mass movements can truly defend civil liberties, argues Peter Stäuber

New Editor at NDPR

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 01/07/2020 - 8:26pm in

Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews (NDPR), the online journal of reviews of philosophy books, has a new editor.

The journal was created in 2002 by Gary Gutting and Anastasia Friel Gutting, who co-edited it until Gary Gutting’s death in 2019. Anastasia Friel Gutting continued as sole editor, but has now announced her resignation.

Jc Beall, who is moving from the University of Connecticut to the University of Notre Dame, will be the new editor-in-chief.

In an announcement at the site, Gutting says that she has transferred ownership of NDPR to the university. She adds:

It was grand creating and co-editing the journal with Gary, and a comfort and pleasure to continue editing after he was gone. None of this could have been, of course, without our superb reviewers and authors, and (very specially) you, our most excellent readers.

You can view her announcement here.

The post New Editor at NDPR appeared first on Daily Nous.

Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 30/06/2020 - 9:50pm in

Here’s the report on new and revised entries in online philosophy resources and new reviews of philosophy books.

SEP

New:

Revised:

  1. Autonomy in Moral and Political Philosophy, by John Christman.
  2. The Cambridge Platonists, by Sarah Hutton.
  3. Leibniz’s Philosophy of Mind, by Mark Kulstad and Laurence Carlin.
  4. Associationist Theories of Thought, by Eric Mandelbaum.
  5. Pragmatism, by Catherine Legg and Christopher Hookway.
  6. Presocratic Philosophy, by Patricia Curd.
  7. Plato’s Aesthetics, by Nickolas Pappas.
  8. Sovereignty, by Daniel Philpott.

IEP  ∅

NDPR

  1. Terence Cuneo and Spencer Case review Morality and Epistemic Judgement: The Argument From Analogy (Oxford), by Christopher Cowie.
  2. David Lefkowitz reviews Legitimacy: The Right to Rule in a Wanton World (Harvard), by Aurhur Isak Applbaum.
  3. John Oberdiek reviews Recognizing Wrongs (Harvard), by John C. P. Goldberg and Benjamin C. Zipursky.
  4. Jessica M. Wilson reviews Physicalism Deconstructed: Levels of Reality and the Mind–Body Problem (Cambridge), by Kevin Morris.
  5. Stephen Kearns reviews Free Will and Epistemology: A Defence of the Transcendental Argument for Freedom (Bloomsbury), by Robert Lockie.
  6. Andrew Youpa reviews Freedom, Action, and Motivation in Spinoza’s Ethics (Routledge), by Noa Naaman-Zauderer (ed.).
  7. Saba Bazargan-Forward reviews War by Agreement: A Contractarian Ethics of War (Oxford), by Yitzhak Benbaji and Daniel Statman.
  8. Kristina Engelhard reviews Power and Influence: The Metaphysics of Reductive Explanation (Oxford), by Richard Corry.
  9. Mirela Oliva reviews Proto-Phenomenology, Language Acquisition, Orality, and Literacy: Dwelling in Speech II (Rowman & Littlefield), by Lawrence J. Hatab.
  10. Paul Hurley reviews Taking Utilitarianism Seriously (Oxford), by Christopher Woodard.

Wireless Philosophy

1000-Word Philosophy

  1. Ethics and the Expected Consequences of Voting, by Thomas Metcalf.

Recent Philosophy Book Reviews in Non-Academic Media ∅

  1. Conscience: The Origins of Moral Intuition, by Patricia Churchland, reviewed by Raymond Tallis at the Times Literary Supplement.
  2. Philosopher of the Heart: The Restless Life of Søren Kierkegaard, by Clare Carlisle, at Bookforum.

Compiled by Michael Glawson.

The post Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update appeared first on Daily Nous.

Book Review: The Infographic: A History of Data Graphics in News and Communications by Murray Dick

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sun, 28/06/2020 - 8:01pm in

In The Infographic: A History of Data Graphics in News and Communications, Murray Dick offers a new cultural history of the infographic, tracing its emergence and development in Britain from the eighteenth century. The book succeeds in offering an account of an evolving media form, showing the infographic to be a contradictory tool, one developed to … Continued

Liberalism At Large: The World According to the Economist - book review

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 26/06/2020 - 4:53am in

Zevin’s history of the Economist magazine opens up a rich angle from which to observe the nature and development of liberalism across 180 years, finds Dominic Alexander

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