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29th PKES Annual Workshop – 29th May

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 03/04/2019 - 11:43pm in

29th PKES Annual Workshop

Goldsmiths, University of London

Room PSH LG01, Professor Stuart Hall building, New Cross, London, SE14 6NW
29 May 2019 10 a.m. – 6 p.m

 

This year, we are delighted to be hosting the Annual Workshop of the Post-Keynesian Economics Society at Goldsmiths. Please register by sending an email to Giorgos Galanis (G.Galanis@gold.ac.uk), indicating if you will join us for dinner (we regret that dinner will be at your own expense).

10.00 – 12.00 Panel 1 

Hector Pollitt, Cambridge Econometrics: The contribution of post-Keynesian economics to climate policy and meeting global decarbonisation targets

Maria Nikolaidi, University of Greenwich: Fiscal policy and ecological sustainability: a post-Keynesian perspective, with Yannis Dafermos

Andreas Joseph, Bank of England: Machine learning for financial crisis prediction and the construction of a coherent narrative, with Kristina Bluwstein, Marcus Buckmann, Miao Kang, Sujit Kapadia and Özgür Şimşek

12.00 – 13.00 Lunch Break

13.00 – 13.20 PKES Annual Report: Engelbert Stockhammer

13.20 – 13.25 Women’s Budget Group: Sara Reis

13.25 – 13.30 The Progressive Economy Forum (PEF): Sue Konzelmann

13.30 – 15.30 Panel 2 

Ron Smith, Birkbeck, University of London: Great ratios in economics: a retrospective

Sue Konzelmann, Birkbeck, University of London: Britain’s post-war industrial development — and the road not taken

Walter Paternesi Meloni, Roma Tre University: Reverse hysteresis? Persistent effects of autonomous demand expansions, with Daniele Girardi and Antonella Stirati

15.30 – 16.00 Coffee Break

16.00 – 18.00Panel 3

Sara Reis, Women’s Budget Group: The female face of poverty – causes and consequences of poverty for women

Aurelie Charles, University of Bath: Blurring the individual boundaries: investigating perceptions of being men and women in the Mezzogiorno of Italy, with Paola De Pascali and Giuseppe Fontana

Özlem Onaran, University of Greenwich: The effects of income, gender and wealth inequality and economic policies on macroeconomic performance, with Cem Oyvat and Eurydice Fotopoulou

19.00 Dinner

Organising committee

Giorgos Galanis, Maria Nikolaidi, Engelbert Stockhammer

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The Politics of Democratizing Finance: A Radical View – 21 March

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 26/02/2019 - 11:45pm in

Michael A. McCarthy, Marquette University
21 Mar 2019, 6:00pm – 8:00pm
251, Richard Hoggart Building

How might popular control of finance be democratically durable? This talk compares five competing proposals that promise to subject the allocation of finance to greater democratic control: breaking up the banks, public investment banks, sovereign wealth funds, inclusive ownership funds, and bank nationalization. It argues that even if installed, business counter-mobilizations and poor governance designs threaten to erode their democratic character and ultimately weaken them over time. To be democratically durable, finance reform first needs to undermine the critical sources of finance’s power – active engagement in politics and structural prominence in capitalist political economies. Bank nationalization appears the best suited to do that. But even so, nationalization is not sufficient. If finance capital is demobilized, the capacities of ordinary citizens to influence the allocation of finance must also be expanded or governance will be subject to capture by special interests in the state. The talk concludes by considering possible democratic governance institutions situated outside of formal institutions of the state: participatory budgeting, governance boards, and deliberative minipublics.

Presenter: Michael McCarthy, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Marquette University, author of Dismantling Solidarity: Capitalist Politics and American Pensions Since the New Deal (Cornell, 2017). He is currently writing a book on democratizing finance for Verso.

Discussant: Sahil Jai Dutta is a Lecturer in Political Economy at Goldsmiths, University of London, and a member of the Political Economy Research Centre (PERC). He has particular interests in finance, money, management, and the political economy of Britain.

You can now listen to a recording of this event here:

 

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Call for Papers: “The Specter of Capitalism in International Studies”

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 22/02/2019 - 5:23am in

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Call for papers for the 13th Pan-European Conference on International Relations, September 11–14, 2019, Sofia, Bulgaria.

Call for abstracts – Critical Macro-Finance Workshop

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 15/02/2019 - 9:33pm in

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Critical Macro-Finance Workshop

Warwick Critical Finance Group & Political Economy Research Centre at Goldsmiths

9-10 September 2019 at Goldsmiths, University of London

 

A decade after the 2008 financial crisis, new political economic imaginaries have emerged to make sense of our financialised world. As the work of scholars such as Adam Tooze and Daniela Gabor has shown, critical macro-finance is one of the most important of these trends. It has shed light on the infrastructure of contemporary global finance, the links between shadow banking, money markets and monetary policy, and the evolving governance architecture established in the wreckage of the crash. This work can seem obtuse and technical at first and in the domain of (heterodox) economics rather than broader political economy traditions. Yet it has important implications for how we understand the categories of ‘state’, ‘market’, ‘governance’ and ‘power’ in the contemporary world.

Following the open and collaborative spirit established at our previous two workshops, the Warwick Critical Finance Group (WCF) and Political Economy Research Centre (PERC) at Goldsmiths are collaborating to explore these implications and move the conversation into new directions. We want to discuss the basic methods of critical macro-finance analysis and debate its uses and misuses for understanding the political economy of global finance. And we seek to break fresh ground for a conversation between critical macro-finance and existing debates and approaches in political economy research. The workshop will take place 9-10 September 2019 at Goldsmiths in London.

Papers and Participants

Instead of the standard panel and paper presentation format, we invite academics who work broadly within the field of critical macro-finance to submit papers that can be used as a basis for discussion of one or more of the following themes:

• How can we politicise critical macro-finance?
• How can we historicise critical macro-finance?
• How does critical macro-finance relate to and inform geopolitics/IPE?
• How does critical macro-finance relate to and inform discussions on the Global South?
• How does critical macro-finance relate to the literature on financialisation?

Accepted papers will be divided into these themes and authors will be asked to give a brief presentation of their papers. However, the main focus of the event is placed on informed debates on the questions posed above between the authors as well as other participants.

Paper proposals should be submitted to wcf@warwick.ac.uk in form of an extended abstract (400-500 words) detailing which of the above research theme(s) the paper is suited for by 30 April 2019.

We also have a number of places available for non-presenting participants who are interested in joining the debate.

Registration Fee

The registration fee is £25 for the full two days.

Funding

Limited funding is available to support travel expenses for a number of unfunded participants. If you would like to apply for financial assistance, please include a short case for support (max. 200 words) when submitting your abstract.

Timeline:

• Application deadline: 30 April 2019
• Notification of acceptance: 15 May 2019
• Registration deadline: 30 June 2019
• Workshop: 9-10 September 2019

You can find the Call for Papers here, more information to follow soon!

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Money, Markets, and Monarchies in the Middle East – 7 March

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sun, 10/02/2019 - 11:56pm in

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6-8pm, Thursday 7 March, Goldsmiths, 142, Richard Hoggart Building

Join us for a for a conversation between Adam Hanieh and Jeffery R. Webber on Hanieh’s new book Money, Markets, and Monarchies: The Political Economy of the Middle East.

Framed by a critical analysis of global capitalism, this book examines how the six states of the Gulf Cooperation Council are powerfully shaping the political economy of the wider Middle East. Through unprecedented and fine-grained empirical research – encompassing sectors such as agribusiness, real estate, finance, retail, telecommunications, and urban utilities – Adam Hanieh lays out the pivotal role of the Gulf in the affairs of other Arab states. This vital but little recognised feature of the Middle East’s political economy is essential to understanding contemporary regional dynamics, not least of which is the emergence of significant internal tensions within the Gulf itself. Bringing fresh insights and a novel interdisciplinary approach to debates across political economy, critical geography, and Middle East studies, this book fills an important gap in how we understand the region and its place in the global order.

Adam Hanieh is a Reader in the Department of Development Studies, SOAS University of London.

Jeffery R. Webber is a Senior Lecturer in International Political Economy at Goldsmiths, University of London.

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Standstill: the psycho-politics of acceleration – 27th February

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 30/01/2019 - 10:14pm in

6-8pm, 27th February
RHB137a, Goldsmiths

Josh Cohen and Will Davies in discussion on the topics of their recent books, Not Working and Nervous States

In his new book, Nervous States, Will Davies addresses how and why the paranoid psycho-somatic condition of the ‘state of nature’ has woven its way into everyday life, as a result of technologies and ideologies of ‘real-time’ reactivity. Politics has become literally and figuratively neuro-logical, inasmuch as we rely on immediate reaction to navigate the digital public sphere and space, bypassing thought in the process.

Josh Cohen’s Not Working intervenes in this contemporary neurasthenic condition, exploring the different ways in which it might be challenged and escaped through art, psychoanalysis, philosophy and practices of everyday life. A contemporary politics, he suggests, must be a defence of the spaces where nothing much happens.

Will and Josh will be in conversation on the different dimensions of our state of anxiety and its relationship to our experience of time.

You can listen to a recording of this event below

 

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Brazil Under Bolsonaro – Alfredo Saad-Filho & Jeffery R. Webber – 14 March

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 25/01/2019 - 5:59pm in

6-8pm
LGB G3, Goldsmiths

Join us for a conversation with Alfredo Saad-Filho and Jeffery R. Webber on Saad-Filho’s new book and the rise of Bolsonaro in Brazil.

Jair Bolsonaro’s recent ascension to the Brazilian presidency is the latest addition to a rising wave of far-right governments. A parliamentary coup in 2016 ousted the democratically-elected Dilma Rousseff of the Workers Party and set the stage for the 2018 elections after the brief rule of unelected Michel Temer. During last year’s electoral campaign, we witnessed the imprisonment of Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva (“Lula”) under dubious corruption charges just as he was leading the 2018 polls as the Workers Party’s presidential candidate, helping to ensure Bolsonaro’s victory.

What explains the Bolsonaro phenomenon? What were the key characteristics and contradictions of the 14-year Workers Party rule that preceded Bolsonaro?

To get to the roots of these issues, Jeffery R. Webber will pose a series of questions to Alfredo Saad-Filho about his new book, Brazil: Neoliberalism vs Democracy, and how the arguments therein relate to the present conjuncture.

Brazil is the world’s sixth largest economy, has played a key role as one of the ‘pink wave’ administrations in Latin America, and was also responsible for wrecking the US-sponsored proposal for a Free Trade Area of the Americas. It is also one of the few large countries where social spending has risen and the distribution of income has improved in the last thirty years.

However, as protests during the World Cup in 2014 have shown, the country remains highly unequal, unmet social needs are vast and its infrastructure is precarious.

Brazil: Neoliberalism vs Democracy reviews the paradox that is modern-day Brazil. Focusing on the period from 1980 onwards, the book analyses the tensions between the two systemic transitions to have dominated the country: the political transition from military rule to democracy, and to neoliberalism. The authors show how these transitions had contradictory logics and dynamics, yet ultimately became mutually supportive as they unfolded and intertwined.

———-

Alfredo Saad-Filho is a Professor in the Department of Development Studies at SOAS, University of London.

Jeffery R. Webber is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Politics and International Relations at Goldsmiths, University of London

 

You can now listen to a recording of this event here:

 

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Money, Markets, and Monarchies in the Middle East – 7th March

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Thu, 17/01/2019 - 2:05am in

Money, Markets and Monarchies in the Middle East

6-8pm, 7th March
RHB 142, Goldsmiths

Join us for a for a conversation between Adam Hanieh and Jeffery R. Webber on Hanieh’s new book Money, Markets, and Monarchies: The Political Economy of the Middle East

Framed by a critical analysis of global capitalism, this book examines how the six states of the Gulf Cooperation Council are powerfully shaping the political economy of the wider Middle East. Through unprecedented and fine-grained empirical research – encompassing sectors such as agribusiness, real estate, finance, retail, telecommunications, and urban utilities – Adam Hanieh lays out the pivotal role of the Gulf in the affairs of other Arab states. This vital but little recognised feature of the Middle East’s political economy is essential to understanding contemporary regional dynamics, not least of which is the emergence of significant internal tensions within the Gulf itself. Bringing fresh insights and a novel interdisciplinary approach to debates across political economy, critical geography, and Middle East studies, this book fills an important gap in how we understand the region and its place in the global order.

 

The post Money, Markets, and Monarchies in the Middle East – 7th March appeared first on Political Economy Research Centre.

‘(Mis) Representing the Economy’ – Simon Wren-Lewis, Mike Berry, Ben Chu & Ali Norrish – 31st January

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 21/12/2018 - 8:57am in

(Mis) Representing the Economy

Mike Berry, Simon Wren-Lewis, Ben Chu, Ali Norrish and Aeron Davis

5-7pm, Thursday 31st January

Professor Stuart Hall (PSH), LG01

Please join Simon Wren-Lewis and Mike Berry to talk about the themes of their new books on public (mis) representations of economics in UK journalism and politics. Simon Wren-Lewis’s book, The Lies We Were Told, explores the political and economic coverage of the financial crash, austerity economics, the Eurozone crisis, Trump’s America and Britain’s Brexit. The book asks why did governments adopt austerity, why did the media ignore the experts and fail to challenge political lies, and why did voters choose Brexit against their economic interests? Mike Berry’s The Media, the Public and the Great Financial Crisis, investigates the impact of the UK media on public knowledge and understanding of the 2008 financial crisis and policy responses to that. Drawing on extensive content analysis, public focus groups and interviews with leading journalists, it explains how UK media let the true culprits off the hook and legitimised austerity economic policy.

Joining Simon and Mike, to talk about these themes and arguments will be Ben Chu, economics editor at the Independent and Ali Norrish, a campaigner for better public understanding of economics. The event will be chaired by Aeron Davis of Goldsmith PERC and MCCS Department.

Speakers

Simon Wren-Lewis is Emeritus Professor of Economics at Oxford University and also an Emeritus Fellow at Merton College. He was previously Professor of Economic Policy at the Blavatnik School of Government at Oxford University. Alongside his academic research, he has advised the Treasury, Bank of England, the IMF, the Office for Budget Responsibility and the Labour Party’s Economic Advisory Council. Since starting his Mainly Macro (and Mediamacro) blog at the end of 2011 he has become one of Britain’s most respected economists. The blog has become an influential resource for policymakers, academics and social commentators around the world. He recently won the New Statesman/SPERI prize for Political Economy.  His new book (Bristol University Press, 2018) presents some of his most important work, telling the story of how the damaging political and economic events of recent years became inevitable.

Dr Mike Berry is a Senior Lecturer at Cardiff University School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies. He has had previous posts at the Universities of California Santa Barbara, Nottingham and Glasgow, where he did his PhD and was a member of the Glasgow Media Group. He has produced research for a variety of organisations including the BBC Trust, UNHCR, TUC and NSPCC. With Greg Philo he is the author of three books in the Bad News from Israel series (Pluto, 2004, 2006, 2011). Most recently, he has spent some time researching and publishing on media coverage and public understanding of the financial crash and austerity: the subject of his book (Palgrave, 2019).

Ben Chu has been the economics editor of The Independent since 2011. Before that he was chief leader writer. He is also the author of Chinese Whispers: Why Everything you Heard About China is Wrong (Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 2013).

Ali Norrish is Head of Research and Schools at Economy. Kickstarted by Rethinking Economics, the now global university student movement, Economy’s mission is to democratise economics. Their research has highlighted the deficit around economics communication and understanding in the public sphere and finds routes to transform economics into a more accessible public conversation. Economy’s publications include Experiencing Economics (2017), Doing Economics Differently (2018) and The Econocracy (Manchester University Press, 2016).

Aeron Davis is Co-Director of Goldsmiths PERC and Professor of Political Communication in the Department of Media, Communication and Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths, University of London. He is the author of six books, most recent of which are Reckless Opportunists (MUP, 2018) and Political Communication: A New Introduction for Crisis Times (forthcoming, Polity, 2019). He has also researched and written widely about economic and financial news.

All are welcome and no registration is required. For details on how to find Goldsmiths, click here.

 

You can now listen to an audio recording of the event here:

 

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Conference Call for Abstracts – Risk and Uncertainty in the Anthropocene

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 18/12/2018 - 7:31pm in
A one-day conference at Goldsmiths
hosted by the Political Economy Research Centre
and the Centre for the Understanding of Sustainable Prosperity

Wednesday 26th June 2019

Confirmed keynotes:
Prof. Louise Amoore
(Durham University)
&
Prof. Geoff Mann
(Simon Fraser University)

Deadline for abstracts: Friday 29th March 2019

Email abstracts of 250 words max. to: Nick Taylor (n.taylor@gold.ac.uk)

This conference aims to explore from a multidisciplinary perspective the role of risk and uncertainty in the Anthropocene. It invites papers that explore the specific logics, strategies, forms of knowledge and technologies that different actors are, or should be, using to approach risk and uncertainty.

The scale and timing of existing and potential impacts of environmental degradation in the Anthropocene appear to belie our efforts to interpret and manage them. Yet ‘risk management’ remains the dominant mode of representing and governing catastrophic environmental change, with the pretension of ‘taming uncertainty’. Managed as risk, environmental breakdown and catastrophe can be approached in accounting and investment terms: they can be rendered ‘investable’, and conducive to market opportunity and framings such as ‘natural capital’.

This ‘new era’ of environmental breakdown challenges established forms of expertise and authority and tasks us with thinking about new approaches to politics and political economy. Embracing radical uncertainty permits us to consider multiple, alternative futures, opening up for discussion political and economic settlements seemingly out of reach. But given the timescales for responding to threats such as the climate crisis, what kind of politics or political economy does fast approaching existential risk provoke? Suggestions for ‘war mobilisation’ analogies in fighting climate change or ideas about engineering the planet might give some indication.

In facing the need for transformative and systemic change, it is also necessary to question who will bear the risks and uncertainties of the Anthropocene. How will risk and the costs of mitigation be distributed over time and space? Where will it be situated – locally, at the urban level, globally – and what consequences does this have for different disciplinary approaches? Papers are welcomed that address the intersection of, on the one hand, technical questions of optimality and economic efficiency and, on the other, normative questions of justice, sustainability and equality.  

Questions for discussion (not limited to):

  • How and with what tools and expertise are Anthropocene futures being calculated and managed as risks, including by the financial and insurance sectors?
  • How should political theory for the Anthropocene conceptualise risk and uncertainty?
  • What should we understand as existential or civilizational risk, and how are actors in different sectors of society and the economy responding to it?
  • What is the established political system’s response to risk and uncertainty in the Anthropocene (e.g. financial regulation)?
  • How are techniques of futures, forecasting and foresight being employed to help represent and govern uncertainty?
  • What timescales are being employed in governing and accounting for the future?
  • What risks and political threats are posed by exceptional political responses, including geo-engineering and forms of quasi-military ‘mobilisation’?

Expressions of interest or questions are welcome at any time, please email Nick Taylor (n.taylor@gold.ac.uk). Abstracts of 250 words maximum should be sent to the same address by 29th March 2019.

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