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The need is to fix the system, not just to provide ‘sticking plasters’

Food Bank Cupboard stocked with tinned and packet foodImage by Staffs Live (CC BY-NC 2.0)

“The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.”

Franklin D. Roosevelt

 

It feels lately that we, like Lewis Carrol’s Alice, have fallen down a rabbit hole into an immensely troubling surreal situation with seemingly no idea how we are going to extricate ourselves.

Whether it is the distressing daily reports of Covid-19 deaths, the disturbing video accounts of the huge pressures on our NHS or care services, the political upheavals taking place across the Atlantic and elsewhere or the most serious challenge of all, climate change, it seems ever clearer that we are in Antonio Gramsci’s ‘time of monsters’ in which ‘the old world is dying and the new world struggles to be born’.

What that world will look like remains to be seen, but recent political events would seem to suggest that we still have some way to go before the ‘old world’ breathes its last. The pandemic, combined with the consequences of forty and more years of Neoliberalism Central which has infected every aspect of our lives and dominates political decision making, has created not only public disillusionment, but also petrification as our institutions sit in their blinkered bunkers holding on for dear life to all they knew.

Whether it’s the existing and growing union between government and global corporations, policy decisions which have increased inequality and poverty and encouraged charity, volunteering and philanthropy to take up the reins of public provision, or the promotion of sound finance as a vital component of good governance, the old structures are embedded in our consciousness.

It wasn’t always like this.

During the second world war, William Beveridge was appointed to investigate social security in Britain and his report, published in 1942, identified five major problems which prevented people from improving their lives. These were:

Want (caused by poverty)

Ignorance (caused by a lack of education)

Squalor (caused by poor housing

Idleness (caused by the lack of jobs or the ability to gain employment)

Disease (caused by inadequate health care provision)

It was recognised that government had a role to play in addressing those five ‘evils’ and as a result of the Beveridge report, the post-war government set up the social security system and pursued policies which aimed to address them including full employment. It may not have been perfect, but it changed people’s lives for the better.

Over recent decades, that connection between the state and publicly paid-for provision, management and delivery of services has been broken. Responsibility for such provision is increasingly being shifted into the charitable/voluntary sector, whilst at the same time, the dominant orthodoxy of individual responsibility has led to shaming and blaming people for their situation as the government takes a back-seat role.

Food banks have become a normalised feature of Britain, as Therese Coffey, the Tory minister for the Department for Work and Pensions, indicated last year when she referred to people using food banks as ‘customers’ and suggested they were a ‘perfect way to help the poor’. It implies that government has no role at all in ensuring the economic well-being of its citizens, and worse, that the 14 million Britons who do not have enough to live on are there through their own lack of moral fibre!

When charities buy into this picture and act as mitigators for a rotten economic system (which drives the poverty and inequality, that drive, in turn, the consequences including hunger, homelessness, and illness), they are not aiming to fix the system, but to provide sticking plasters. As such, it demonstrates how they, too, have been captured by an ideology and accept it without question.

This was made shockingly clear in a paid-for content article in this week’s Guardian. The CEO of the Bethany Christian Trust, when talking about tackling the problem of food insecurity said: ‘if by giving someone a meal we’re sitting them down with people they can talk to about debt counselling, mental health issues, addiction, domestic abuse, or whatever help they might need, then that plate of food can work so much harder’.

Rather than starting with the political roots of these problems, charities increasingly view them as issues to be solved through improving the capacity of the individuals themselves to manage the challenges they face.

Quite simply, this facilitates the shifting of blame onto people, rather than highlighting the failure of the government to make provision for its citizens and is classic neoliberal text. As Neil Valley suggests in his article in the New Internationalist ‘The Self-Help Myth’.

‘The pervasive rhetoric of personal responsibility has transformed the role of government and society in the neoliberal era. Where once the role of government was to safeguard the general happiness of the majority of citizens, albeit to varying degrees, its primary role now is to facilitate the conditions where each citizen can take on more and more individual responsibility, absolving the state from its responsibility towards its citizens.’

Then step in charities to fill the gap in service provision and provide the mitigating support for the rotten toxic system which has created the need in the first place and designates those in receipt of such support as customers rather than victims.

The increasingly pervasive narrative, which is being driven further by the pandemic crisis, is that charities and the voluntary sector should be at the heart of our local communities to ensure that vulnerable people don’t fall between the cracks, rather than publicly paid for, managed and delivered state provision.

It was, therefore, all the more disconcerting this week to read the proposal in the left-wing publication The Tribune that a National Food Service should be set up. Whilst its aims to serve the public good rather than private profit are indeed laudable, one has to question the logic.

Of course, one could not object to the removal of private companies delivering public services, given that the tentacles of private profit are growing exponentially as government distributes contracts to its friends and large corporations with few strings attached, whilst at the same time the coffers remain largely bare to serve the needs of those who have for decades been at the sharp end of government policies. The resulting poverty and inequality have been highlighted during this crisis.

The proposal, however, seems to suggest that we mitigate for the crisis of capitalism being played out in the growth of hunger through mutual on the ground action, rather than dealing with its root causes – government policy driven by ideology. We don’t need a plan to ‘respond’ to this fundamental crisis of capitalism, we need a plan to change it; to put public purpose and the interests of citizens, not to mention the planet, at the heart of all government policy.

Over the last few decades, working people have borne the consequences of a toxic economic ideology underpinned by the notion of monetary scarcity, which has led to the reduction in their share of their productivity, which has translated into lower wages, insecure employment and underemployment and a decline in living standards. Poverty is the direct result. The constant repetition of these ideas via politicians, think tanks, economists and the media has led us to believe that this is the inescapable default.

Government, far from serving its citizens, has overseen through its employment and other policies, huge disparities in wealth and access to resources, allowing, for example, chief executives of big corporations to earn many more times that of their employees, not to mention garner political influence as a result.

To add to this picture is the decimation of our post-war public and social security infrastructure, which existed to provide health and social care through various publicly paid for institutions, to ensure that those in need had access to shelter, food and warmth, in times of personal tragedy, sickness, unemployment or economic collapse. When this infrastructure was built, the profiteers had no place in this model and nor should they today.

Whilst the human suffering continues to play out across the nation, the government cynically continues with its U-turns on policy in the vain attempt to keep its MPs and the public on side. Last week, as noted in the MMT Lens, Boris Johnson told MPs that ‘most people would rather see a focus on jobs and growth in wages than…welfare.’ This week, with his signature tune U-Turn, he has indicated a potential rethink of ending the £20 a week Universal Credit uplift, saying he wanted to ensure that ‘people don’t suffer as a result of the economic consequences of the pandemic’. You couldn’t make it up.

Yes, indeed, to more jobs through the implementation of a Job Guarantee, to drive better wages overall and restore the government’s role as the price setter and rebuilding public service provision. But in the meantime, let’s ensure while the consequences of the pandemic continue to cause economic and social pain, that all people have enough to pay their bills and keep food on the table without worry, stress or having to get into debt to keep their heads above water. We have witnessed the power of the public purse, let us not allow that knowledge to be polluted by the restoration of household budget politics.

It is regrettable that politicians, journalists, institutions and think tanks, in their weekly forecasts of doom and gloom, continue to build up the narrative of money scarcity and a future price to pay for this massive round of government monetary intervention. A narrative that will be used to justify eventual hard decisions or another round of austerity in some form or another.

Whilst the livelihoods of many people lie in the balance, not just for now but in a rapidly changing world, we still have to endure the false notions of tax rises to pay for government spending and the penchant for sound finance. Such narratives suggest, not only that people must suffer, but also that the cost of saving our planet from climactic destruction will be too high.

The fact that the government continues to find huge sums of money to support businesses and yet quibbles over a few pounds to working people, suggesting that it is unaffordable should surely be a public conversation starter!

As the chancellor opines that there are some hard choices ahead, one of his treasury ministers clearly of the deficit dove variety, softens the blow by suggesting that the need for tax rises to tackle the record levels of government borrowing could be delayed at least until the economy ‘bounces back’. As if somehow increased tax revenues equate to the capacity to spend or pay down the national debt.

The experts at the Institute of Fiscal Studies and other think tanks then put the fear of God into the public that £40bn in tax rises might be necessary to put the public finances back onto a sustainable footing. Thus, making that public even more cautious about the government’s future spending plans. Self-fulfilling prophecies come to mind.

And then, just this week, when people thought that the vast round of government spending signified a change of approach to managing the economy, Rishi Sunak told Conservative MPs that he will be using his March budget to begin the process of restoring ‘order’ to the public finances through implementing higher taxes.

To those Tories who would like to see the Universal Credit uplift continue beyond April, he gave a reminder of its high cost which represents, according to his calculations, an equivalent of 1p on income tax plus 5p per litre on fuel duty. Thus, further reinforcing the idea that the provision of higher welfare benefits means collecting tax from elsewhere to cover it.

The ‘someone, somewhere will have to pay for it’ model of the state finances will no doubt be used cynically to drive further wedges between the haves and the have nots and justify the further decimation of the already inadequate social security safety net.

According to this narrative, the magic porridge pot is running on empty and needs replenishing in order to pay down debt and avoid a giant burden for future generations.

This tale of supposed coming woe serves to keep people in their place while reinforcing the old myths about how governments spend. It displays both economic illiteracy and a disregard for the lives of those who will lose out as a result, not to mention addressing the biggest challenge of all – climate change.

And then at the ‘left’ end of the household budget scale, we have economists, opposition politicians, unions and other so-called experts, urging the Chancellor to take advantage of low borrowing rates of interest to avoid tax rises until the economy gets back on its feet and restores tax revenues, or reinforcing the false narratives about taxing the rich to pay for the pandemic. The household budget model is endemic and those on the political left keep shooting themselves in the foot repeatedly.

A paper published by the LSE’s International Inequalities Institute last December, using data from 18 OECD countries over the last five decades, concluded unsurprisingly enough that tax cuts for the rich didn’t trickle down; that they contributed to inequality and did little to stimulate business investment.

The authors then went on to suggest that it was time to tax the rich more to repair the public finances. This was backed up in the same month when the Wealth Tax Commission, founded in April of last year, concluded that a one-off wealth tax would raise significant revenue and be fairer and more efficient than other alternatives. To be exact, it suggested that a ‘one-off wealth tax on millionaire couples would raise £260 billion’ The implication being yet again that such a tax could be used to repair the public finances.

Whilst we can’t avoid these false tropes, which lead the public astray and reinforce the messages that government spends like a household, we can challenge them. When Matt Hancock, the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, bleats on as he did this week about the NHS Pay review body taking ‘account of the extremely challenging fiscal and economic context’ in its decision about future pay rises, we can show the public that such decisions have no connection, either with the current state of the public finances or the future monetary affordability of those pay rises.

We can reinforce the message that curtailing public sector pay won’t increase the ability of the government to ‘set the public finances straight’, any more than the decade of austerity did. It could actually have a negative, indeed disastrous, effect on the economy at a time when it will, without doubt, need continuing government support.

Aside from the fact that public sector and, indeed, other key workers have seen their pay dwindle in real terms as a result of a decade of pay freezes or inadequate employment legislation, and that the pandemic has revealed the vital nature of their contribution to society, all increasing taxation will do is leave less money for working people to spend into both the national and local economies. Also, should that increased taxation fall on corporations, (as is being suggested) who will likely pass that additional cost on through higher prices to working people anyway, it will create a double whammy effect.

Whilst a pay rise will increase tax revenues, it will not increase the government’s capacity to spend. But we see the false narrative again in a study published this week by the London Economic Consultancy. The report claimed that the government would recover 81% of the cost of any pay rise in additional taxes, which would, in turn, have significant ‘knock-on’ benefits for the Treasury. Clearly suggesting that tax funds its spending.

Whether from the left or right of the political spectrum, the public is treated daily to a mishmash of false information dictated by the dominant economic paradigm which masquerades as truth. It’s no wonder that people are confused and feel disempowered or turned off by politics and economics, which they feel do not relate to their lives at all, even though, in reality, these things have everything to do with them.

While politicians, journalists and economists argue about monetary affordability and who should pay for government spending, people are dying and will continue to die for the want of a government that puts their interests first.

What happens next will depend on a successful challenge through raising public awareness that there is indeed an alternative to the vast disparities in wealth, the rise of poverty and inequality, the whittling down of democracy and increased corporate dominance in our lives. And it starts with understanding how government really spends.

 

Upcoming Event

Phil Armstrong in Conversation with Pavlina Tcherneva – Online

January 24th 2021 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm GMT

GIMMS is delighted to present another in its series ‘In Conversation’.

Phil Armstrong, author of ‘Can Heterodox Economics Make a Difference’ published in November 2020, will be talking to Pavlina Tcherneva.

Pavlina is program director and associate professor of economics at Bard College and a research associate at the Levy Economics Institute. She conducts research in the fields of modern monetary theory and public policy and has collaborated with policymakers from around the world on developing and evaluating various job-creation programmes. Her work on the Job Guarantee spans over 20 years.

Author of the recently published book ‘The Case for a Job Guarantee’, she challenges us to imagine a world where the phantom of unemployment is banished and anyone who seeks decent living-wage work can find it – guaranteed. It will be of particular relevance as we begin to grapple with the economic fall-out of the Covid-19 pandemic but for anyone passionate about social justice and building a fairer economy it should be essential reading.

We invite you to join us for this informal event which we are sure will be both stimulating and insightful.

Tickets via Eventbrite

 

Past Event

Phil Armstrong in Conversation with Fadhel Kaboub – Online

Author and MMT Scholar Phil Armstrong talks to professor of economics and president of the Global Institute for Sustainable Prosperity Fadhel Kaboub about how MMT insights apply to the global south, colonial reparations, the MMT Job Guarantee contrasted with Universal Basic Income, and much more.

 

 

Audio via the MMT Podcast here

 

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The post The need is to fix the system, not just to provide ‘sticking plasters’ appeared first on The Gower Initiative for Modern Money Studies.

Our choices today will define our humanity and our priorities.

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 21/10/2020 - 6:50am in

People packing plastic bags of food at a food bankImage by Joel Munz on Unsplash

Overcoming poverty is not a task of charity, it is an act of justice. Like slavery and apartheid, poverty is not natural. It is manmade and can be overcome and eradicated by the actions of human beings.

Nelson Mandela

The health and well-being of human beings and the planet is still being pitted against an out of control capitalism defined by excessive consumption and unbridled growth compounded by the lie of balanced budgets and future tax burdens.

In this week’s news, the plight of many poor families struggling to feed their children has yet again come into the spotlight, in what has hitherto been one of the richest countries in the world. The increase in poverty and hunger demonstrated over a decade with the growing number of food banks and other charities has been noted on many occasions in previous MMT Lens blogs.

Covid-19 has exacerbated what was already a rising concern and has left many families stressed and under pressure. Back in July whilst Boris Johnson invited people to spend and spend some more, and Rishi Sunak offered his ‘eat out to help out scheme’ financed from the public purse, those already on limited incomes made worse by the current crisis had no such opportunity.

In the same month, the footballer Marcus Rashford raised public awareness of the plight of families struggling to feed their children and ran a successful campaign to force the government to provide funding for school meals during the summer holidays.

Following the government’s rejection of Rashford’s proposal this week to extend free school meals to holiday breaks including Christmas and Easter, he has pledged to continue his campaign.

He tweeted on 15th October:

It’s … not for food banks to feed millions of British children but here we are. 250% increase in food poverty and rising. […] For too long this conversation has been delayed. Child food poverty in the UK is not a result of Covid-19. We must act with urgency to stabilise the households of our vulnerable children.

His stark comments clearly point to government policies which have directly impacted on the lives of some of the poorest people in our communities, prior to and post-Covid and which, in the future, will affect a broader section of the working population as jobs are lost and the economy destabilises.

It has been estimated by the Food Foundation think tank that as many as 900,000 more children have applied for free school meals, adding to 1.4 million who have already claimed. This will most certainly be the tip of the iceberg over the coming months.

The picture that is increasingly emerging as the economy slows and with the prospect of more business closures and redundancies, should be a serious cause for concern in relation to the consequences for families and their children.

Earlier this week Channel 4 News covered a disturbing report about the rise in child poverty in the Midlands and the North of England where it is, according to figures just published, rising the fastest. Magic Breakfast, a national charity which shockingly provides 48,000 breakfasts nationally, says that demand has increased as a result of the pandemic.

With a particular focus on a breakfast club in a Birmingham school which is handing out breakfast parcels to children to take home, the headteacher said some struggling families had been unable to claim free school meals because they were not eligible for social security benefits and that others who had suffered cuts to household income could still not meet the threshold for free school meals. Commenting that school meals cost £45 a month per child which for many was a great deal of money she said that she had had cases where parents had come to the school with their household bills and bank statements to show that they can’t pay.

As the Channel 4 news reporter commented ‘Child poverty shamed Britain even before the pandemic.’

To highlight growing concerns in political circles a former advisor to the government on homelessness warned that the UK faces a ‘period of destitution’ in which ‘families can’t put shoes on children’. Dame Louise Casey indicated that the proposed reduced level of support would compound the problems faced by growing numbers of families. She criticised the government’s claim that its priority was to protect jobs and incomes saying that many people still risked ‘falling into poverty’.

Along with the threat that the uplift to Universal Credit and Working Tax Credit would not be extended beyond April 2020, the prospects for many families is potentially dire as many more people not able to cover essential bills fall into debt, thus putting further strain on their finances.

The question we should be posing is how has this situation arisen and what can be done to alleviate it? The trail leads always back to government.

While the government propaganda machine promotes Rishi Sunak’s generosity from an ivory tower of ministerial plenty and lauds its additional spending, it is in reality, a fraction of what it needs to do to protect citizens. Not just in the coming months but in the coming years, as the fallout from Covid-19 continues to play out on the economy and the lives of those affected not just by the pandemic but by the compounded consequences of years of austerity and employment policies which have allowed incomes and living standards to fall.

Whilst the government is certainly right to suggest that it should not be for schools to provide pupils with food during the school holidays, it has nothing to do, as the government keeps claiming, with its monetary generosity during these last few months (which one can most certainly take issue with).

The policymakers in Westminster have chosen not to acknowledge the impact of the political decisions which have led to this situation in the first place and well before the pandemic hit and indeed have tried to dress them up as successful outcomes.

Yes, we certainly need a long-term plan to combat hunger, but one that does not involve charitable organisations to fill the gap left by a deliberately negligent government or making people feel as if somehow it is their fault for the situation they find themselves in.

We must firmly reject the implied judgement on people who have fallen on bad times, not of their own making. For too long the blame game has allowed the government to divide the nation when the truth of the matter is that it is government itself which has failed citizens through its policy actions and spending decisions.

The cuts to public spending, the devastating consequences of reforms to social security, government’s ideological adherence to employment policies which allow business to exploit working people through controlling wages and insecure working practices have all played a role.

The rise in charitable food banks, community meal provision, homelessness and increasing private indebtedness is symptomatic of a government which has allowed this unnecessary and damaging state of affairs to exist.

The government’s justification for this truly repugnant state of affairs which has led the government to rule out giving more support to workers and businesses hit by this week’s new lockdowns in the north is because it claims it would cost too much. So once again we are in a situation where government ministers cynically use false narratives to explain their decisions.

The Communities secretary Robert Jenrick said earlier this week that the nation is in a ‘deep recession’, that the ‘the national debt is rising’ and therefore the government is limited in what it can do to protect jobs.

Once again this is a clear demonstration of the abdication of government responsibility for employment, social cohesion and economic well-being. People have become a secondary consideration to the corporate interests, politicians serve and benefit from through the revolving door.

It is regrettable, but understandable, that over a decade and more the nation has accepted the presence of food banks and other charitable organisations as an unavoidable and normal feature of British life, as if somehow the government had no other choice but to cut its spending. The public has up until now accepted the narrative that difficult decisions must be made to get the public finances in order.

After the huge rounds of public spending which challenge the ingrained public preconceptions of how the government spends, the shine of these fairy tale narratives is hopefully beginning to wear off – even as Rishi Sunak promises at the Conservatives virtual conference that the government can always be relied upon the ‘balance the books.’

It cannot be emphasised too strongly that the tragedy of hunger and poverty is one that is avoidable. The government could avert it with a simple instruction to the central bank to spend sufficient money into existence to alleviate that hunger and struggle at such a critical time. That it has been a choice not to, should be the point at which we stand up and argue for real change.

And yet, instead, the monetary reality of the government as the monopoly currency issuer is hidden behind a screen of smoke and mirrors which continued this week when the IFS (Institute of Fiscal Studies) suggested that taxes may have to rise at some point in the future given the huge spike in government ‘borrowing’ this year to deal with the economic fallout of the pandemic. Saying clearly and quite rightly that tax increases would be the wrong action at the moment, it then went on to reinforce the message that once the economy had been restored to health  the government would have to get the public finances back on track with a round of ‘fiscal tightening’.

And so, the active and deliberate reinforcement of a lie sets the scene at some time in the future for more unnecessary and damaging punishment which will not, in reality, be linked to whether it is monetarily affordable but the government’s political agenda in creating a flow of public money into private profit and the further destabilisation of public services.

After 10 years of fiscal tightening following the Global Financial Crash which has left our public infrastructure in tatters, have we learned nothing?

While the likes of the IFS and the IMF accept that we need to limit the economic damage caused by the virus and address poverty, unemployment and inequality through higher public spending, they always do so with false ‘borrowing cheaply’ narratives, pumping the belief that we are at the mercy of money lenders and the implication that with the exponential growth of public debt there will be a price to pay … but not quite yet.

Whilst there may be a sea change in economic thought occurring as governments spend to keep economies afloat, it is important that the work to raise public awareness of the real choices governments face continues. These are not linked to balance sheets they are ones related to real resources. In the words of the economist Ellis Winningham ‘, we will always have the ‘money’ to do whatever our real resources will allow us to do.’  That is the only constraint. And the challenge is both to match spending to available resources and determine how those resources will be distributed within the nation and for whose benefit.

Deborah Harrington, a member of GIMMS’ advisory board, also made it absolutely clear this week to those on the left who continue to tout the lie about taxpayers’ money on various social media sites that:

“Covid has demonstrated that the government does not need one penny of taxes to ‘pay for’ what it needs. It has neither raised taxes nor sold bonds to ‘finance’ its spending. The money has been created pure and simple. It wasn’t borrowed and it wasn’t collected in extra taxes – in fact, tax receipts have fallen, obviously, as incomes have dropped.

 

The whole story of tax and borrowing disguises this power at the heart of government. It makes people believe there’s a limited pot to dip into. That to pay Peter you have to rob Paul. It’s the driving argument behind austerity and if you continue to support it as an argument ‘we need tax rises/future generations will pay for it’ then you – yes, YOU, reading this – are giving your support to an agenda that destroys public services and leaves people in poverty and homelessness.

What we build society with and what we create goods and services with is our work. Government simply chooses how much money it will use in any given year to divert those resources, through its taxation and spending policies, to public purposes.”

 Whilst we seem a long way from it at the moment, creating a more equable, fair and environmentally sustainable world should be at the top of the political agenda. The only way of achieving those aims is a long-overdue public conversation about our political, economic and societal priorities, examined within the context of the constraints that exist to deliver them and how the share of finite resources should or could be redistributed to serve the public purpose.

The question always returns to what sort of society do we want to live in? One where excessive wealth in few hands dominates, where charity becomes the norm for delivery of services to a ‘deserving’ population and growth and consumption is the drug which drives the economy?

Or alternatively, a different but better world where people have the wherewithal to live comfortably and sustainably with hope for the future?

 

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The post Our choices today will define our humanity and our priorities. appeared first on The Gower Initiative for Modern Money Studies.