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Murdoch Pissed To Only Receive $10 Million Of The Government’s 90 Billion Spend

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 24/07/2020 - 9:05am in

Rupert-Murdoc-001

Media mogul and American citizen Rupert Murdoch is reportedly extremely pissed at the Morrison Government after his pay TV network Foxtel only received $10 million dollars of the Governments 90 billion dollar spend.

”Mr Murdoch is definitely  not happy and he has told his scribes to start sharpening their pencils,” said a Murdoch Insider. ”Doesn’t this Government realise how much Mr Murdoch does for them?”

”I mean which news channel and newspapers help them start and fight the culture wars, surely that is worth more than $10 million dollars.”

When asked for comment on Mr Murdoch’s displeasure a spokesperson for the Prime Minister said: ”You can assure Mr Murdoch we will look after him later in the year. We are currently working on a plan to maybe merge the ABC with Sky News.”

”The 7:30 Bolt report does have a nice ring to it, doesn’t it.”

Mark Williamson

@MWChatShow

You can follow The (un)Australian on twitter @TheUnOz or like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/theunoz.

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PM Panics After Learning Cormann Did The Numbers For The Budget

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Thu, 23/07/2020 - 8:03am in

cormann

Australia’s part-time Prime Minister Scott Morrison is said to be panicked after learning that the numbers that Treasurer Josh Frydenburg will announce later today as part of his budget update were calculated by the Finance Minister Matthias Cormann.

”This is a potential disaster, the numbers were looking bad already but knowing that Matthias worked them out well good knows how bad they actually are,” said a Government Insider. ”One thing we are hoping for is Matthias usually gets the numbers wrong and lists them as being higher than what they actually are, like he did with Dutton’s leadership challenge.”

”If that’s the case here then who knows maybe the budget deficit is only fifty billion instead of near one hundred billion.”

When asked why Cormann managed to hold on to his job for so long given his inability to deal with numbers, the Government Insider said: ”You know the saying keep your friends close and your enemies closer.”

”Scotty from marketing knows that Dutton would knife him in the blink of an eye, so keeping Matthias around as Peter’s numbers man is a great insurance policy for the Prime Minister.”

”Now, if you’ll excuse me I need to head to an emergency meeting that the PM has called at Maccas Engadine. Don’t suppose you know where I could grab some toilet paper?”

 

Mark Williamson

@MWChatShow

You can follow The (un)Australian on twitter @TheUnOz or like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/theunoz.

We’re also on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/theunoz

The (un)Australian Live At The Newsagency Recorded live, to purchase click here:

https://bit.ly/2y8DH68

Kelly Gang Commended For Wearing Masks

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 21/07/2020 - 7:39am in

Ned Kelly

Dan Andrews has praised outlaw Ned Kelly and his gang for following the correct mask wearing protocol while going about their business of robbing banks and ranging about in the bush.

“I watched the video Ned put up on YouTube about how to make a simple mask from iron plough shares that he had lying about his shanty and I was very impressed,” said the Victorian Premier at a press conference as he nailed a wanted poster to a gum tree. “As long as he and his gang continue to wash their hands between each incident of bailing up a trooper and leaving them to die in the bush I can see no problem with allowing them to stay in business.”

Mr Kelly described other bushrangers such as Ben Hall and Captain Starlight as “wombat headed big bellied magpies” for refusing to wear masks when holding up stages as it conflicted with their cool dandy highwayman images.

The Premier also praised medium sized independent supermarket spokesperson “Tuckerbag” for refusing to leave the house without his customary brown paper bag over his head.

“I have only the highest respect for Mr Bag on the stand he is taking, and also for letting me know where I can purchase super sized boxes of Omo washing powder at 40% off.”

Peter Green

@Greeny_peterNed Kelly

You can follow The (un)Australian on twitter @TheUnOz or like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/theunoz.

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Beer Mats of the 1970s

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sun, 28/06/2020 - 9:11pm in

The pubs have reopened. Here is a selection of 1970s beer mats from the Scarfolk council archives. Collect them all!

Abbott and Howard Argue Over Who Should Be First To Provide Dyson Heydon With A Reference

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 23/06/2020 - 8:08am in

JOHN HOWARD OM FILE

Former Prime Ministers Tony Abbott and John Winston Howard have gotten in to a heated argument over who should be first to provide disgraced former High Court judge Dyson Heydon with a character reference.

”It was quite a discussion between the two former PM’s and at one stage it did look like Tony was considering shirt fronting John,” said a Liberal Party Insider. ”John was adamant that as he was the one to appoint Dyson to the High Court that he should be the one to defend him.”

”Whilst Tony wanted to atone to Dyson for not being able to knight him.”

When asked why the former Prime Ministers were so keen to provide references to disgraced prominent men, the Liberal Party Insider said: ”I don’t know it’s like someone cast a Pell, I mean spell over them.”

”They see a prominent white man of power in trouble and they leap to their defense.”

”If only they were so attentive to the victims of men like Heydon and Pell.”

Mark Williamson

@MWChatShow

You can follow The (un)Australian on twitter @TheUnOz or like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/theunoz.

We’re also on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/theunoz

The (un)Australian Live At The Newsagency Recorded live, to purchase click here:

https://bit.ly/2y8DH68

Government To Handout $25K Grants For Anti-5Gers To Cover Their Houses In Foil

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Thu, 11/06/2020 - 7:00am in

malcolm-roberts

The Morrison Government has announced a new $25,000 grant for people who are fearful of 5G technology to cover their houses in tin foil. The announcement comes following extensive lobbying from One Nation Senator Malcolm Roberts.

”This is a good first step, however I would like the Government to consider banning 5G technology and perhaps installing someone with proper knowledge in the area like say Pete Evans as a sort of Ombudsman,” said Senator Roberts.

”Pete Evans is the type of voice this country needs to hear more from, scientists have had their time in the sun.”

When asked what evidence existed that 5G technology was harmful to humans, Senator Roberts said: ”What evidence? What evidence? Where do I begin, sit down and let me take you on a tour of the dark web.”

”I have 1000’s of hours worth of blogs, tweets and YouTube clips that will definitely open your eyes up to the realities of the World.”

”If you’d just put on this tin foil hat and follow me down to my secret bunker.”

Mark Williamson

You can follow The (un)Australian on twitter @TheUnOz or like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/theunoz.

We’re also on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/theunoz

The (un)Australian Live At The Newsagency Recorded live, to purchase click here:

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Unknown Poster Campaign (1970s)

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 09/06/2020 - 8:15pm in


No one is entirely sure what the purpose of this public information poster was. All we know is that when a council worker accidentally posted it on billboards around Scarfolk, the poster below was quickly pasted over it. 

Records show that the errant, anonymous worker was soon sold to another council where his job was either to feed the council pets or be fed to the council pets. Documents don't clarify which.  

A Chronicle of a Lost Decade Foretold

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 02/06/2020 - 5:04am in

Many on the left still cling to the hope that the COVID-19 crisis will translate into the use of state power on behalf of the powerless. But those in authority have never hesitated to harness government intervention to the preservation of oligarchy, and a pandemic alone won't change that. Continue reading

The post A Chronicle of a Lost Decade Foretold appeared first on BillMoyers.com.

Sympathy for the devil

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 29/05/2020 - 12:50am in

Imagination is key to our capacity to extend sympathy to others, but can be easily exploited by the powerful as a tool to overshadow systemic injustices.

 

People take news of other people’s suffering in different ways. In March, on hearing that Boris Johnson had contracted coronavirus, a friend of mine who is a staunch atheist, texted me to quip: ‘There is a god!’ I laughed, knowing that it was her faith in science that lay behind her exclamation of divine justice.

In boasting about shaking the hands of patients with coronavirus, surely Johnson had no-one but himself to blame for not taking protective measures? In believing himself to be above other, less fortunate others, the virus proved that Johnson was not immune from the consequences of his own actions.

Some have since argued that only an impersonal threat, invisible microbes, could manage to escape the dark art of the spin-doctor, as any medical one. Populist politics may trade in emotions rather than facts, but this leaves leaders such as Trump and Johnson vulnerable to certain truths when laid bare for all to see.

This last weekend, an alternative reading of power was offered by another friend. I was surprised to hear an NHS worker admit that she identified with Dominic Cummings wanting to be with his family and so felt unable to condemn him for his law-breaking. Good people, it seems, naturally extend their own human response towards others.

Fellow-feeling was exploited by members of The Cabinet in defense of Dominic Cummings, with Michael Gove urging us all to concede that ‘caring for your wife and child’ is ‘not a crime’. This supportive tweet followed-up on Cumming’s wife’s own slot on Radio Four’s Thought For The Day, which saw the power of prayer further invoked into the discourse surrounding her husband’s (good) fortune and (good) character. ‘An extremely kind man’.

The question of what kinds of empathy are appropriate to extend to those in positions of power is a subject of speculation beyond my circle of friends. In Against Empathy, Paul Bloom argues against thinking that our ‘ability to feel the suffering of others for ourselves’ is the ‘source of all good behaviour’. While empathy inspires act of care and protection in personal relationships, Bloom argues that it has the ‘opposite effect’ in the wider world. Research in psychology and neuroscience shows that ‘we feel empathy most for those we find attractive and who seem similar to us and not at all for those who are different, distant or anonymous’.

David Graeber also offers useful insights into patterns of ‘sympathetic identification’. In his book The Utopia of Rules, he references Adam Smith’s Theory of Moral Sentiments to argue that while human beings naturally identify with each other’s joys and sorrows, limits are placed on how these extend to the unfortunate. ‘Compassion fatigue’ follows from trying to extend our feelings to the poor and those so ‘consistently miserable’ that we feel ‘simply overwhelmed’ by their plight. Graeber says how we are ‘forced, without realising it, to blot out their existence entirely’.

His words remind us of how the sheer scale of the number of deaths from coronavirus can serve to obscure and numb feelings of grief. Graeber’s description of the ‘lopsided structures of the imagination’ seemed all the more pertinent on the same weekend that Cummings was threatened with receiving his comeuppance.

That same Sunday, The New York Times published a list of a thousand victims of the pandemic in the US on its front pages. The visual message, so unlike any regular headline, sought to present facts as emotional truths. It brought to mind other attempts to lend ‘imagination’ to mass death, as with the visualisation of scale provided by the AIDS quilt (or Names Project). This also strove to give human dimension to a pandemic, through taking-up public space in a novel way.

We know that the poor have been disproportionately affected by the virus, with maps of New York districts mirroring the unequal effects of the virus as accurately as the maps of London’s poor that were produced in the Victorian era (when Engels first coined the term ‘social murder’ for those who perished before their time in Manchester’s slums.)

However, instead of lingering on the NY Times long columns, my eyes were drawn to Cummings own visual strategies. Carrying a child’s bike and ball in hand, he climbed into his car to admonish the press photographers for not ‘standing 2m apart’. These theatrical props were designed to support his narrative of being a caring parent rather than an unaccountable autocrat. (It was also resonant of other ‘supporting’ frames used by guilty men – Harvey Weinstein pushing his zimmer frame walker to the courtroom.)

Pressed into an extraordinary public performance on Bank Holiday Monday, Cummings once again utilised the signifiers of domesticity, nature and innocence – a jug of clear water, white clothing, a sweetly fragrant rose garden. This setting was intended to suggest lack of artifice – by contrast the nearby podium of power, behind which Boris would later appear.

Asked about the credibility of Cummings story – that he drove to a beauty sport to ‘test his eyesight’ – the PM commented: ‘I have to wear specs…eyesight can be a problem associated with coronavirus.’ Turning a blind eye was, quite literally, presented by Johnson as medical side effect of the virus.

Graeber’s words seemed to resonate across these bizarre events all too clearly. He acknowledges how ‘imagination tends to bring with it sympathy… but the result is that the victims of structural violence tend to care about its beneficiaries far more than those beneficiaries care about them.’ Relationships of unequal power distort our capacity to see clearly how we view the humanity of others in relation to our own.

In drawing attention to familial feeling, Cumming’s effects seems to have saved his political skin, for now, at least. Pundits have concluded that Cummings can now only be judged in the ‘court of public opinion’. One tweet proffered the psychological observation that ‘sociopaths have no regard for the social contract, but know how to use it to their advantage… I am sure that if the devil existed, he would want us to feel very sorry for him.’ While by the end of the weekend, my NHS friend had re-assessed her earlier opinion, along with a significant proportion of the British public. Yet Cummings remains.

The PM final excuse was that he behave like ‘every father and every parent’. Graeber concludes his analysis with a chilling note on the effectiveness of promoting a divisive unity of false equivalence: ‘This might well be, after the violence itself, the single most powerful force preserving such relations’.

 

Dr Frances Williams recently completed a PhD at Manchester Metropolitan University where she studied the relation of the field of practice known as ‘arts in health’ to discourses of devolution.  She is a Visiting Researcher at Glyndwr University.

The post Sympathy for the devil appeared first on Political Economy Research Centre.

Sympathy for the devil

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 29/05/2020 - 12:50am in

Imagination is key to our capacity to extend sympathy to others, but can be easily exploited by the powerful as a tool to overshadow systemic injustices.

 

People take news of other people’s suffering in different ways. In March, on hearing that Boris Johnson had contracted coronavirus, a friend of mine who is a staunch atheist, texted me to quip: ‘There is a god!’ I laughed, knowing that it was her faith in science that lay behind her exclamation of divine justice.

In boasting about shaking the hands of patients with coronavirus, surely Johnson had no-one but himself to blame for not taking protective measures? In believing himself to be above other, less fortunate others, the virus proved that Johnson was not immune from the consequences of his own actions.

Some have since argued that only an impersonal threat, invisible microbes, could manage to escape the dark art of the spin-doctor, as any medical one. Populist politics may trade in emotions rather than facts, but this leaves leaders such as Trump and Johnson vulnerable to certain truths when laid bare for all to see.

This last weekend, an alternative reading of power was offered by another friend. I was surprised to hear an NHS worker admit that she identified with Dominic Cummings wanting to be with his family and so felt unable to condemn him for his law-breaking. Good people, it seems, naturally extend their own human response towards others.

Fellow-feeling was exploited by members of The Cabinet in defense of Dominic Cummings, with Michael Gove urging us all to concede that ‘caring for your wife and child’ is ‘not a crime’. This supportive tweet followed-up on Cumming’s wife’s own slot on Radio Four’s Thought For The Day, which saw the power of prayer further invoked into the discourse surrounding her husband’s (good) fortune and (good) character. ‘An extremely kind man’.

The question of what kinds of empathy are appropriate to extend to those in positions of power is a subject of speculation beyond my circle of friends. In Against Empathy, Paul Bloom argues against thinking that our ‘ability to feel the suffering of others for ourselves’ is the ‘source of all good behaviour’. While empathy inspires act of care and protection in personal relationships, Bloom argues that it has the ‘opposite effect’ in the wider world. Research in psychology and neuroscience shows that ‘we feel empathy most for those we find attractive and who seem similar to us and not at all for those who are different, distant or anonymous’.

David Graeber also offers useful insights into patterns of ‘sympathetic identification’. In his book The Utopia of Rules, he references Adam Smith’s Theory of Moral Sentiments to argue that while human beings naturally identify with each other’s joys and sorrows, limits are placed on how these extend to the unfortunate. ‘Compassion fatigue’ follows from trying to extend our feelings to the poor and those so ‘consistently miserable’ that we feel ‘simply overwhelmed’ by their plight. Graeber says how we are ‘forced, without realising it, to blot out their existence entirely’.

His words remind us of how the sheer scale of the number of deaths from coronavirus can serve to obscure and numb feelings of grief. Graeber’s description of the ‘lopsided structures of the imagination’ seemed all the more pertinent on the same weekend that Cummings was threatened with receiving his comeuppance.

That same Sunday, The New York Times published a list of a thousand victims of the pandemic in the US on its front pages. The visual message, so unlike any regular headline, sought to present facts as emotional truths. It brought to mind other attempts to lend ‘imagination’ to mass death, as with the visualisation of scale provided by the AIDS quilt (or Names Project). This also strove to give human dimension to a pandemic, through taking-up public space in a novel way.

We know that the poor have been disproportionately affected by the virus, with maps of New York districts mirroring the unequal effects of the virus as accurately as the maps of London’s poor that were produced in the Victorian era (when Engels first coined the term ‘social murder’ for those who perished before their time in Manchester’s slums.)

However, instead of lingering on the NY Times long columns, my eyes were drawn to Cummings own visual strategies. Carrying a child’s bike and ball in hand, he climbed into his car to admonish the press photographers for not ‘standing 2m apart’. These theatrical props were designed to support his narrative of being a caring parent rather than an unaccountable autocrat. (It was also resonant of other ‘supporting’ frames used by guilty men – Harvey Weinstein pushing his zimmer frame walker to the courtroom.)

Pressed into an extraordinary public performance on Bank Holiday Monday, Cummings once again utilised the signifiers of domesticity, nature and innocence – a jug of clear water, white clothing, a sweetly fragrant rose garden. This setting was intended to suggest lack of artifice – by contrast the nearby podium of power, behind which Boris would later appear.

Asked about the credibility of Cummings story – that he drove to a beauty sport to ‘test his eyesight’ – the PM commented: ‘I have to wear specs…eyesight can be a problem associated with coronavirus.’ Turning a blind eye was, quite literally, presented by Johnson as medical side effect of the virus.

Graeber’s words seemed to resonate across these bizarre events all too clearly. He acknowledges how ‘imagination tends to bring with it sympathy… but the result is that the victims of structural violence tend to care about its beneficiaries far more than those beneficiaries care about them.’ Relationships of unequal power distort our capacity to see clearly how we view the humanity of others in relation to our own.

In drawing attention to familial feeling, Cumming’s effects seems to have saved his political skin, for now, at least. Pundits have concluded that Cummings can now only be judged in the ‘court of public opinion’. One tweet proffered the psychological observation that ‘sociopaths have no regard for the social contract, but know how to use it to their advantage… I am sure that if the devil existed, he would want us to feel very sorry for him.’ While by the end of the weekend, my NHS friend had re-assessed her earlier opinion, along with a significant proportion of the British public. Yet Cummings remains.

The PM final excuse was that he behave like ‘every father and every parent’. Graeber concludes his analysis with a chilling note on the effectiveness of promoting a divisive unity of false equivalence: ‘This might well be, after the violence itself, the single most powerful force preserving such relations’.

 

Dr Frances Williams recently completed a PhD at Manchester Metropolitan University where she studied the relation of the field of practice known as ‘arts in health’ to discourses of devolution.  She is a Visiting Researcher at Glyndwr University.

The post Sympathy for the devil appeared first on Political Economy Research Centre.

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