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Exclusive: Haitians Reject Calls For US Military Intervention

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Thu, 29/07/2021 - 1:24am in

Two weeks after the assassination of Haitian President Jovenel Moïse, the specter of U.S. military intervention looms large over the island nation. While the Biden administration has rebuffed a request for intervention made by Claude Joseph – a longtime NED asset whom Washington briefly backed as prime minister in the immediate aftermath of the killing – it has not completely ruled out the possibility. 

​In the days immediately following Moïse’s grisly machine-gun murder on July 7 by U.S.-trained Colombian mercenaries, the Washington Post editorial board published a call for a “swift and muscular intervention” — what would be the fourth U.S. military invasion of Haiti since 1915, when U.S. Marines first occupied the hemisphere’s second independent nation.

 

On July 13, as the Biden administration signaled its reluctance to launch a full-scale invasion of Haiti, the Post editorial board published a second call for U.S. military intervention, suggesting that it was the least bad option.

 

The same day, Post columnist and neoconservative writer Max Boot published an op-ed asserting that Haitians actually desire a U.S. invasion, entitled “Sorry, Haiti. The world’s policeman is officially off duty.”

 

Even the ostensibly progressive lawmaker Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) refused to take a clear position against an intervention, saying that she opposed it “right now” and “without any sort of plan.”

While the Washington consensus is firmly in support of U.S. military deployment in Haiti, MintPress News traveled to Port-au-Prince to ask random Haitians in the street what they thought of a possible intervention.

​“We don’t want a military intervention,” Adrien Willien told MintPress. “We are for Haitians putting their heads together.”

​“We don’t want any foreign intervention to come resolve our problems for us,” echoed Ernst C. Denoir. “On the contrary, that would be pouring gas on the fire, making the situation worse.”

Contrary to the claims of self-appointed spokesman for the Haitain people Max Boot and his fellow neoconservative ideologues at The Washington Post, not a single Haitian with whom MintPress News spoke agreed. In fact, many were outraged at the suggestion and hold the United States responsible for the current violence and dysfunction plaguing Haiti.

“The insecurity you see here is programmed by the oligarchy and the imperialists,” thundered Denoir.

Meanwhile, thousands of Haitians turned out on Friday, July 23 for Moïse’s state funeral in Cap Haïtien, the capital of the northern department where he was raised. Many hurled curses at the U.S. delegation — which included U.S. Ambassador to Haiti Michele Sison, and was headed by U.S. Ambassador to the UN Linda Thomas-Greenfield — as it approached the funeral’s stage. The U.S. delegation fled the ceremony before it was over, when police fired warning shots and tear-gas to repel angry crowds wanting to enter the ceremony or stop it until the intellectual authors of the assassination are found.

​Despite its claims to have no plans “for now” to invade Haiti, the U.S. has appointed a Special Envoy to Haiti, Daniel Foote, and will begin advising the Haitian National Police (PNH) in “anti-gang fighting,” Haitilibre reported July 24.

​U.S. troops, backed by those from France and Canada, last invaded Haiti immediately following the February 29, 2004 coup d’état against President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. As was done after their 1994 intervention, they handed the ensuing military occupation of Haiti over to a United Nations “peace-keeping” force after three months. UN forces occupied Haiti for the next 15 years.

​The troop deployment violated Chapter 7 of the UN Charter, which specifies that the Security Council can use force only “to maintain or restore international peace and security” (i.e., in a conflict between two states), not to meddle in an internal political conflict. The Haitian Constitution also forbids foreign troops on Haitian soil.

​The 2004 intervention began on February 28 when a SEAL team, led by U.S. Chargé d’Affaires Louis Moreno, surrounded Aristide’s home, then threatened and browbeat the president into boarding an unmarked jet, which whisked him away to Africa. Aristide later called the abduction a “modern kidnapping.”

​“We remember that the U.S. came and took our charismatic leader, Jean-Bertrand Aristide,” in 2004, recalled Willien. “That coup d’état is the cause of the state we are in today.”

“The U.S. betrayed the Haitian people when it kidnapped Aristide,” Willien concluded.

The bitter taste of past military interventions and occupations informs the almost universal Haitian public opinion against another U.S. incursion.

Featured photo: A protester holds up a sign during a protest to demand the resignation of Haiti’s president Jovenel Moise in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2021.  ( AP Photo/ Dieu Nalio Chery)

Dan Cohen is the Washington DC correspondent for Behind The Headlines and MintPress News. He has produced widely distributed video reports and print dispatches from across Israel-Palestine. He tweets at @DanCohen3000.

The post Exclusive: Haitians Reject Calls For US Military Intervention appeared first on MintPress News.

Fresh audio product

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sat, 24/07/2021 - 6:54am in

Just added to my radio archive (click on date for link):

July 22, 2021 Robert Fatton, author of The Guise of Exceptionalism, on the assassination of Haiti’s president and the long history that led to this sorry pass

US Cannibals in Haiti... and other tales of Voodoo Economics in the Triste Tropiques

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 20/07/2021 - 2:53am in

Tags 

articles, IMF, Haiti

In 2004, a group of murderous gangsters who called themselves The Cannibals led an insurrection against Haiti’s first democratically elected President, Jean-Bertrand Aristide. US President George W. Bush immediately, swiftly sided with... READ MORE

US Military Intervention Is Never, Ever, EVER The Solution

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 16/07/2021 - 12:10am in

Listen to a reading of this article:

https://medium.com/media/35ebb48c0b59beaf99641c48b6083438/href

The imperial propaganda machine is blaring loudly about anti-government protests in Cuba after ignoring anti-government protests in Brazil, Haiti, Chile and Colombia which were much larger and often met with much harsher police responses.

There is nothing surprising about this; the imperial media always ignore protests in member states while amplifying them in unabsorbed territories. But what is a bit surprising is how many calls we are seeing for US military intervention in Cuba despite the US military’s consistent and unbroken track record of always making things worse.

The mayor of Miami went on Fox News to encourage the Biden administration to consider airstrikes and other military options. Right-wing pundit Kurt Schlichter is calling for an invasion to topple Havana and former congressman Carlos Curbelo is saying that Biden should “keep all options on the table” for acts of war. Participants in US rallies against the Cuban government frequently voice support for military intervention.

https://medium.com/media/b05dc7c6a0c644e7613aa57fb8a194a5/href

Which is of course bananas. It appears unlikely that any overt US military action is on its way at this stage in the game; most Americans don’t even support the economic blockade on Cuba much less airstrikes or an invasion, so we’re not anywhere near that level of consent-manufacturing at this time. But it’s just amazing that this is an idea that’s getting any traction at all.

People who believe US military intervention solves problems are as dumb as flat-earthers but infinitely more destructive. It is always disastrous and it never achieves what its proponents claim it will achieve.

Whenever I say this I always get one or two geniuses stepping in to say “Aha, I believe you are forgetting a little thing known as World War Two?”

To such Einsteins I always say yes, your mind burns with the brightness of a thousand galaxies, but first of all that wasn’t interventionism since the US was attacked and Germany declared war on it immediately thereafter. More importantly, though, it’s very telling that people have to reach all the way back through history to an age where the world was almost unrecognizably different from the world of today to even try and find an example of the US military being used in a way that was not evil and disastrous.

After Korea, Vietnam, Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya etc, the facts are in and the case is closed. The interventionists have lost the argument. US interventionism is always the wrong answer to every question, unless the question is “How do we destroy that country?” or “How do we generate an obscene amount of wealth for obscenely horrible people?”

This was true last year when people were calling for regime change intervention in Iran, it was true the year before that when they were calling for regime change intervention in Venezuela, it is true now when they are calling for regime change intervention in Cuba, and it will remain true when they call for regime change intervention in whatever their next target will be.

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The correct answer to “What should be done about Cuba’s problems?” is for the US to end its cruel blockade. After that happens the correct answer to “What should be done about Cuba’s problems?” is “None of your fucking business.”

Whenever the empire is targeting a socialist government you see public discourse get dragged into a debate about socialism versus capitalism. Capitalism proponents cite the economic hardships and ensuing protests in the country as evidence that socialism doesn’t work, ignoring both the crushing economic sanctions and the obvious fact that per their own logic protests and economic hardship in capitalist nations means capitalism doesn’t work. Socialists fight back against this, and it becomes a big loud back-and-forth which drowns out the much stronger and completely indisputable point that US interventionism is literally always disastrous and literally never helpful.

It’s seriously the worst possible tool you could possibly use for any job; people only think you can solve problems by sending in the marines because they’ve watched too many movies glorifying the US military and depicting problems being solved by Good Guys With Guns. A casual glance at America’s history of interventionism immediately makes it clear that you’d have to be a pants-on-head fucking moron to believe it can help the Cuban people or anyone else.

It’s like trying to solve a math problem with a blowtorch.

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In every debate about whether or not to send in the US military to a foreign nation, you could just as easily substitute Godzilla and have the pro-intervention side look just as rational:

Person A: Look at all that poverty and unrest!

Person B: I know, it’s terrible.

Person A: You know what we should do?

Person B: Please don’t say send in Godzilla.

Person A: We should send in Godzilla!

Person B: No, he always makes things worse! You know that! Every time we send in Godzilla to try and solve problems in the world, he just ends up trampling all over the city, knocking down buildings and killing thousands of people with his atomic heat beam.

Person A: Maybe this time would be different though!

Person B: Why in God’s name would this time be different?? You said it would be different in Iraq, in Libya, in Syria. What happened there?

Person A: He trampled all over the cities, knocked down the buildings and killed people with his atomic heat beam.

Person B: Exactly! So what makes you think sending in Godzilla would be any different this time?

Person A: Well we can’t just do nothing!

Person B: Dude, doing nothing would be infinitely better than sending in Godzilla to do the thing he literally always does.

Person A: Hey, inaction has consequences too you know! You probably don’t even talk to Cubans. My brother’s co-worker’s dentist is Cuban, and he says a Godzilla rampage is just what they need. You should listen to Cubans.

Person B: No matter how many Cubans I talk to, it will still be an indisputable fact that Godzilla rampages are always disastrous and always make things worse.

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And it’s not just Cuba; there’s a push for interventionism in Haiti as well in the wake of President Jovenel Moïse’s assassination. The Washington Post editorial board has called for “swift and muscular intervention” from the US and United Nations, despite swift and muscular intervention being precisely the cause of Haiti’s problems. This would be less egregious than a full-on invasion since it’s Haiti’s de facto prime minister Claude Joseph asking for intervention, but there’s substantial opposition to outside interference from Haitians who don’t even recognize the authority of Joseph to extend such an invitation.

In an even remotely sane world, people promoting US interventionism would be regarded the same as people who endorse genocide or oppose age of consent laws. It is only because we live our lives saturated in mass media propaganda that the madness of promoting something so consistently destructive and horrific is tolerated in polite society.

US military interventionism is never, ever, ever the solution. You’re never going to make things better using something that always makes things worse. Virtually anything else would be preferable.

It’s amazing this even needs to be said.

____________________

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Haiti: The Trail of Blood That Leads Back to The U.S.

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Thu, 15/07/2021 - 4:41am in

Critical Hour hosts Garland Nixon and Wilmer Leon talk to Palast about the recent assassination of Haiti’s president, Jovenel Moïse, and the trail of blood that leads back to the United States. The trio also discuss the socioeconomic background against which this murder occurred, and how the economy of this mineral and agriculturally rich Caribbean nation has been systematically... READ MORE

History of a Haitian Holocaust

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 12/07/2021 - 6:50pm in

A decade ago, Haiti was devastated by an earthquake. It’s still devastated. And what I wrote a decade ago remains too relevant. If you want to understand Haiti, you have to understand two and a half centuries of ... READ MORE

Colombian Assassins Practiced Long Before Haiti HitMercenaries who killed Jovenel Moïse attempted to murder Hugo Chavez

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sat, 10/07/2021 - 8:43pm in

The U.S. media is aghast that Colombian mercenaries were hired to assassinate Haiti’s president, but this is the same operation that was hired by a U.S. company to murder Hugo Chavez — a story which got ... READ MORE

What’s Behind The Assassination Of Haitian President Moïses?

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 09/07/2021 - 2:23am in



The assassination of Haitian President Jovenel Moïse sent shockwaves through the tiny Caribbean island nation and beyond. While little is known about what happened overnight Wednesday, it appears that a group of foreign mercenaries with inside knowledge of Moïse’s home were responsible for carrying out the operation that killed him.

Moïse was an extremely unpopular figure who had overstayed his term as president as was ruling by decree. Mass protests against his rule and corruption have coalesced into a revolutionary movement led by former police officer Jimmy “Barbecue” Cherizier. Cherizier has managed to unite nine gangs into a single movement aimed at redistributing wealth amassed by the country’s wealthy minority.

Journalist and English language editor of the media outlet Haite Liberte, Kim Ives, joins Dan Cohen to discuss who might be behind the assassination of Moïse and the revolutionary movement brewing in the streets.

Kim Ives:

My guess is that it’s more coming from the bourgeoisie. And that’s because there is a revolution underway in Haiti. The huge lumpenproletariat of Port-au-prince has grown to over three million people. Fifty years ago Haiti was primarily an agricultural society, small peasants. But due to neoliberal policies, the dumping of rice under the Clinton administration on Haiti and destroying Haitian rice production, destroying the lemon production, the coffee production, a lot of the dumping is coming from the Dominican Republic too.

Essentially Haitian agriculture is a shadow of its former self and all those displaced peasants ended up in the cities in these huge shantytowns where people have no work, no services, and they’re living day-to-day. As a result what have emerged are strongmen, in these neighborhoods, gangs, some of them engaged in kidnapping and crime and terrible things, preying on even their own population. But there is another faction that emerged which called itself the G9, now it’s called the Revolutionary Forces of the G9 family and allies. And they were against the criminal elements. They were fighting the criminal elements and in fact, have now called for a revolution.

Their leader, a guy called Jimmy “Barbecue” Cherizier – and we can talk more about him – has said “We’re going to the banks, we’re going to take the money that’s ours there. We’re going to go to the car dealerships to take our cars. We’re going to go to the supermarkets and take our food. So he’s calling for a revolution of the people in these shantytowns of the lumpenproletariat against these bourgeoisie, twelve families, as he says, who control the entire economy. The ports, the factories. They own a lot of the land, etc. So I think they were scared to death of this guy. He scared the daylights out of them. Add to that fact, one of the principal opposition leaders or I should say opposition bourgeois backers is a guy Reginald Boulous, had an arrest warrant put out for him this week.

Between Cherizier’s revolution, which looked like the end of the world to them, plus the arrest warrant, I don’t think it’s far-fetched to think that a number of the bourgeois, or maybe one or maybe a consortium of them because this operation definitely cost some money, may have got themselves together, hired these mercenaries, they go in, they do the job, they get Jovenel out of the way, and now they are going to concentrate on putting down this rebellion from the shantytowns. Put down this lumpenproletariat. Now the big problem there is how are they going to do it?

They need somebody strong in leadership. And Jovenel was not that. Jovenel was embattled, Jovenel was isolated. He had no state authority, so they need to get a strong leader in. They need to reinforce the 15,000 member police force. There is only 500 soldiers in the army. And so this is maybe Plan A. But Plan B, maybe, a fourth foreign military occupation, where the US comes in and says “Look, it’s terrible. They killed the president. They couldn’t do them, they don’t know how to carry out democracy, we have to come in again. We hate to do it. And they try to send in another UN force. Their big problem there is that they declared war on China. So China can say screw that. You guys aren’t doing anything with this security council. You aren’t doing anything with this security council. You’re not getting any chapter 7 again for Haiti. So Biden may find himself between a rock and a hard place on this one. I don’t know if they’re going to be able to get a fourth military occupation in a century into Haiti and the Haitian people certainly are not going to accept it. So we have a very complicated situation.”

Feature photo | Haiti’s President Jovenel Moise, center, leaves the National Pantheon museum in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Dieu Nalio Chery | AP

Dan Cohen is the Washington DC correspondent for Behind The Headlines. He has produced widely distributed video reports and print dispatches from across Israel-Palestine. He tweets at @DanCohen3000.

The post What’s Behind The Assassination Of Haitian President Moïses? appeared first on MintPress News.