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Much Fewer Academic Philosophy Jobs Advertised This Season

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 02/11/2020 - 10:00pm in

Compared to previous years, the number of academic jobs advertised this season is much lower.

According to an analysis by Charles Lassiter (Gonzaga) posted at his blog, “there are 53% fewer jobs posted on PhilJobs in 2020 compared to 2018 and 2019.” By this time in 2018 there were 270 jobs posted, and in 2019 there were 267. This year: 126.


Graph by Charles Lassiter

There was a 73% decline in advertisements for tenure-track positions this season, compared to last fall:


Graph by Charles Lassiter

There hasn’t been much of a decline in post-doc positions, though:


Graph by Charles Lassiter

Dr. Lassiter notes:

The long-term effects of this are hard to discern, but of this much we can be confident: there’s going to be a hell of a backlog of job-seekers for the foreseeable future. The job market wasn’t pretty before, and it’s only going to get worse. It’s not as though the jobs are going to spring back right away, if at all…. In light of this, I hope that departments and the APA increase their efforts to promote non-academic careers… The situation was already unsustainable, and the pandemic has only made matters worse. The profession can’t keep continuing to prioritize academic over non-academic careers. This is an opportunity to grow and adapt.

 

Related posts: Daily Nous Non-Academic Hires Page; Supporting Non-Academic CareersGrad Programs and Non-Academic CareersDuties to Graduate Students Pursuing Non-Academic CareersProgram Funds Non-Academic Internships for Philosophy PhD StudentsNew Site Interviews Philosophers With Non-Academic CareersProfiles of Non-Academics with Philosophy DegreesAPA Issues New Guide For Philosophers Seeking Non-Academic Jobs

The post Much Fewer Academic Philosophy Jobs Advertised This Season appeared first on Daily Nous.

The Professional Status of “Pro-Life” Positions on Abortion

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 14/10/2020 - 2:03am in

Should junior job seekers try to avoid outing themselves as “pro-life”?


[Sarah Leonard, “Venus Fly Womb”]

A version of this question was discussed recently at The Philosophers’ Cocoon. The worry that prompted that discussion is that the pro-life view on abortion is perceived as sexist, and so philosophers who would like to avoid having a sexist colleague will avoid hiring people who defend that view.

There are a number of questions one could unpack here: (1) What exactly are we referring to by “pro-life” views on abortion? (2) Which, if any, of these views are sexist? (3) Does sincerely defending a sexist view make one sexist? (4) Is a job candidate’s sexism sufficient grounds for not hiring them? (5) Is the charge of sexism a red herring? Might it be viewed as sufficiently objectionable by others in the profession that some anti-abortion views restrict the liberty of women, regardless of whether the position or the arguments for it are sexist? (6) What should pro-life job candidates do?

I can’t take up all of these questions in this post. But I will share some thoughts about the first two, since I know everyone wants to hear what a man has to say about sexism and abortion.*

To start with a rather obvious point, there are lots of relevant distinctions to make here. Let’s just look at one: the distinction between the question of the moral permissibility of abortion (“the moral question”) and the question of the moral permissibility of banning abortion (“the legal question”). It’s worth making this distinction because it doesn’t follow from the judgment that some act is wrong that it should be illegal and its prohibition enforced by coercion. (Nor is it the case that some act has to be immoral for it to be right to make that act illegal.)

The moral question of abortion is really complicated, and I think philosophers—especially those most familiar with philosophical work on abortion—acknowledge this, and would not jump to the conclusion that someone who argues that most abortions are immoral is sexist.

I certainly don’t think they should jump to that conclusion; whether the conclusion is warranted depends on whether the anti-abortion argument in question is sexist. If one’s argument against abortion depends on premises that hold women’s interests to not be of equal moral importance to the interests of others, that’s one way an argument may be sexist. But not all anti-abortion arguments do that. To take a simple example, classical (total) utilitarianism does not weight interests differentially based on whose they are, but nonetheless the view implies that most abortions are wrong.

Of course, whether jumps to certain conclusions should be taken is different from the matter of whether they are taken. Am I right in thinking that this is not an especially popular jump?

What about the legal question? An assumption that a philosopher is sexist in virtue of supporting legal prohibitions on most abortions seems to have somewhat more warrant than the assumption that a philosopher is sexist in virtue of holding merely that most abortions are immoral. This is because to support making abortion illegal is to support special governmental prohibitions and use of force on women in regard to choices about their own bodies and lives in highly personal, invasive, and significant ways. But how much more warrant, I don’t know.

(I want to say that it is probably better to assess the individual arguments than make an assumption based on the conclusion of the arguments, but I see the counterexamples to that—do I need to assess individual arguments for race-based slavery? can’t I reasonably assume they’re racist based on their conclusion? At the same time, it’s not certain the analogy supporting these counterexamples is apt.)

And again, whether the belief that such views are sexist is warranted, there’s the question of whether the belief that they’re sexist is widespread. I’m not quite sure what to think about that. We could find out if you shared your views on the matter. Then there’s the question of how such beliefs affect hiring and the distribution of professional opportunities, and the further question of what job candidates with anti-abortion views should do in light of this, if anything.

Discussion of these and related questions are welcome.

(Since one’s own position on abortion may influence one’s view of whether certain views of the topic are sexist or perceived as such, it may be useful to share your position when you comment on these matters.**)

* Is there anything worse than having to explain a self-deprecating joke?

** For what it’s worth, I find Elizabeth Harman’s arguments in favor of the moral permissibility of early abortion compelling, and I am generally opposed to legal prohibitions on abortion.

Note: comments on this post are moderated and may take some time to appear.

Related: Political Hostility and Willingness to Discriminate in Philosophy, The Philosophy and Politics of Early Abortion in the U.S., Philosophers On the Ethics and Politics of Abortion.

UPDATE: Comments are now closed on this post.

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The post The Professional Status of “Pro-Life” Positions on Abortion appeared first on Daily Nous.

New Site Presents Philosophy Job Placement Data

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 22/09/2020 - 5:15pm in

Charles Lassiter, associate professor of philosophy at Gonzaga University, has created a new site to provide job placement information about philosophy Ph.D. programs.

The site contains graphs and tables for departmental placements per graduate, junior placement rates, a searchable drill-down table where users can see where graduates of a program have historically placed, and more. It’s based on data from PhilJobs, downloaded information on graduation rates, and some assumptions, and covers the time period of January 2011 to September 2020.

Professor Lassiter calls it a “first attempt at coming up with a model for placement rates in philosophy,” and notes that in some ways it is not complete (check out the “Into the Weeds” section for more details on how it was made). He aims to update it every six months, in September (for job seekers) and March (for students headed into PhD programs).

You can explore the site here. Below is just one item from it: junior placement rates by department.

The post New Site Presents Philosophy Job Placement Data appeared first on Daily Nous.

Fraser from Hong Kong to Toronto

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 07/09/2020 - 6:15pm in

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Chris Fraser, currently Professor and Chair of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Hong Kong, will be moving to the University of Toronto.

Professor Fraser is known for his work in classical Chinese philosophy and comparative philosophy. His recent books include The Essential Mozi: Ethical, Political, and Dialectical Writings (Oxford, 2020) and The Philosophy of the Mozi: The First Consequentialists, (Columbia, 2016). You can learn more about his research here and here.

At Toronto, Professor Fraser will be the Richard Charles & Esther Yewpick Lee Chair in Chinese Thought and Culture. His main appointment at Toronto will be in the Department of Philosophy, and he will also hold a cross-appointment in East Asian Studies. He takes up his new position in July of 2021.

(via Martin Pickavé)

The post Fraser from Hong Kong to Toronto appeared first on Daily Nous.

C$2 Million Gift to McGill Philosophy for Technology & Human Nature Professorship

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 04/08/2020 - 10:58pm in

The Department of Philosophy at McGill University received C$2 million (approximately $1.5 million) donation to establish an endowed chair in philosophy of technology.

The donation is from Canadian investor and philanthropist Stephen A. Jarislowsky, through his foundation. McGill provided another C$2 million to help endow the position.

The Stephen Jarislowsky Chair in Technology and Human Nature “will bring together a deep understanding of new technology along with a strong philosophical perspective on the many issues inherent in the development of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and other technologies which are rapidly changing our world,” according to a press release from McGill. Though based in Department of Philosophy, the position is interdisciplinary in nature; the holder of the position will work with other units at the university, such as the Yan P. Lin Centre for Freedom and Global Orders, as well as “the wider Montreal technology community.”

Further information is here.

(via Jacob Levy)

[image: modified version of “Robot ‘The Thinker'” by Anatole Branch]

The post C$2 Million Gift to McGill Philosophy for Technology & Human Nature Professorship appeared first on Daily Nous.

Cullity from Adelaide to ANU

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 21/07/2020 - 10:04pm in

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employment, hiring

Garrett Cullity has just moved from the University of Adelaide to take up a position as professor of philosophy at Australian National University (ANU).

Professor Cullity is known for his work on a wide range of topics in moral philosophy. His most recent book is Concern, Respect, and Cooperation (Oxford University Press). You can learn more about his research here and here.

(via Christian Barry)

The post Cullity from Adelaide to ANU appeared first on Daily Nous.

Schneider from Connecticut to Florida Atlantic

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sat, 18/07/2020 - 12:00am in

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employment, hiring

Susan Schneider, professor of philosophy and cognitive science at the University of Connecticut and current NASA-Baruch Blumberg Chair at the Library of Congress and NASA, is moving to Florida Atlantic University (FAU). 

Dr. Schneider is known for her research in philosophy of mind and artificial intelligence, and is the author of, most recently, Artificial You: AI and the Future of the Mind (Princeton University Press). She also is a prolific public philosopher who has discussed her work and has been featured in various media.

At FAU, Dr. Schneider will be the William F. Dietrich Professor of Philosophy, with a joint appointment in the university’s Brain Institute. She will also be the founding director of a new center at the university focused on the future of the mind. She takes up her new position this fall.

More information here.

The post Schneider from Connecticut to Florida Atlantic appeared first on Daily Nous.

Metz from Johannesburg to Pretoria

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Thu, 09/07/2020 - 4:54pm in

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employment, hiring

Thaddeus Metz, currently at the University of Johannesburg, will become professor of philosophy at the University of Pretoria.

Professor Metz is known for his work on the meaning of life, value theory, legal and political philosophy, and African philosophy. You can learn more about his research here.

He takes up his new position at Pretoria later this year.

The post Metz from Johannesburg to Pretoria appeared first on Daily Nous.

Kosch from Cornell to Johns Hopkins

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 10/06/2020 - 4:32am in

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employment, hiring

Michelle Kosch, currently professor of philosophy at Cornell University, has accepted an offer from the Department of Philosophy at Johns Hopkins University

Professor Kosch is known for her work on Kant and post-Kantian European philosophy. Among other things, she is the author of Freedom and Reason in Kant, Schelling and Kierkegaard (Oxford University Press, 2006) and Fichte’s Ethics (Oxford University Press, 2018). You can learn more about her research here and here.

She will take up her new position as professor of philosophy at Johns Hopkins this coming Fall.

The post Kosch from Cornell to Johns Hopkins appeared first on Daily Nous.

Harris from Hong Kong Baptist to Colorado State

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 08/06/2020 - 9:08pm in

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employment, hiring

Eirik Lang Harris, currently associate professor of philosophy at Hong Kong Baptist University, will be moving to the Department of Philosophy at Colorado State University

Professor Harris is known for his work in early Chinese political philosophy, ethics, and philosophy of law. He is the author of The Shenzi Fragments: A Philosophical Analysis and Translation  (Columbia University Press, 2016) and numerous articles. You can learn more about his work here and here.

He takes up his new position at Colorado State in January, 2021.

(via Jeff Kasser)

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