horror

Cartoon: Taste the Blood of Maggie Thatcher

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 19/02/2020 - 7:22am in

Welcome to another of my little artistic pieces, in which I attempt to satirise the Tories and Boris’ monstrous government. They’re mostly inspired by Horror movies, and the on which this one is based is Hammer’s Taste the Blood of Dracula. In the cartoon, the blood’s Maggie’s. And the person doing the tasting is Iain Duncan Smith, who, as the former head of the DWP, is responsible for a lot of it.

As always, I hope you enjoy it. And please, don’t let the Conservatives or the vile right-wing press give you nightmares.

Cartoon: The Barclay Twins as ‘Twins of Evil’

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 11/02/2020 - 12:04am in

Here’s another cartoon in which I try to portray members of the Conservative establishment as figures from ‘Orror flicks. This time the personages being skewered are those two gentlemen of the fourth estate, the Barclay twins. They’re the weirdo owners of the Torygraph, now going down the drain rapidly. I’ve try to portray them as the creepy twin little girls from Kubrick’s The Shining.

Enjoy, and don’t have nightmares. It’s only Tories.

 

Cartoon: From Below Journalistic Standards

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 03/02/2020 - 5:39am in

Welcome to another of my cartoons satirising the Tories. In this one I try to send up two of the most notorious of their press lackeys – Rebecca Wade and her boss, Rupert Murdoch. The cartoon’s inspired by the 1980s Lovecraftian Horror flick, From Beyond by Stuart Gordon and Brian Yuzna. Gordon and Yuzna have made a number of films based on the works of H.P. Lovecraft, beginning with Reanimator, which remains probably the best known of them. Based very roughly on Lovecraft’s story ‘From Beyond the Wall of Sleep’, The film is about a pair of scientists, who attempt to see into unknown dimensions beyond our own using a device, the resonator, which stimulates the pineal gland. One of the entities attacks and kills the lead scientist, Dr. Pretorius. His assistant, crawford Tillinghast, is arrested and confined in a lunatic asylum. He then attempts to clear himself by taking a policeman, Bubba Brownlee , and female sychiatrist Katherine McMichaels back to his laboratory to show them he’s telling the truth about the experiments. Setting the resonator running again, Pretorius returns, gradually mutating into a terrible monster intent on evil. The film’s slogan was ‘Humans are such easy prey’, which became the comment in the cartoon because of the Murdoch press’ complete contempt for press regulators and their vain attempts to uphold journalistic standards.

I’m afraid the text isn’t easy to see, as the red I used is too close to the background purple. But I hope you can still make it out.

Enjoy!

 

Lookalikes: Eric Pickles and Monster from H.P. Lovecraft

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 29/01/2020 - 7:40am in

Mike yesterday put up a piece mischievously suggesting that Sajid Javid, the current Chancellor of the Exchequer, bears an uncanny resemblance to the Dr. Who villain, the Collector, from the Tom Baker era story The Sunmakers, and also Gollum from Lord of the Rings. Javid was posing in publicity photo with the new 50 pence piece, which will be issued to mark Brexit. And yes, he does look somewhat like Gollum, shown in a still from the movie in which he peers at the One Ring.

In the same spirit, I’ve also noticed an uncanny similarity between the former Tory minister, Eric Pickles, and a monster in Tim White’s awesome cover painting for the third volume of Grafton’s H.P. Lovecraft Omnibus, The Haunter of the Dark.

Eric Pickles

Lovecraftian Horror

Of course, there’s no similarity whatsoever between stories of a group of monsters aiming to enslave and destroy humanity, and the creatures of H.P. Lovecraft.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mr H Reviews Praising New Lovecraft Movie ‘The Colour Out Of Space’

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 27/01/2020 - 1:35am in

Something different from politics this time, which I hope will pique the interest of fans of the 20th century SF/Horror writer H.P. Lovecraft. Richard Stanley has directed a film version of Lovecraft’s short story, ‘The Colour Out Of Space’. Starring Nicholas Cage, Joely Richardson, Tommy Chong and others, the film’s due to be released in Britain on the 28th February.

Mr H Reviews is a film news and reviews channel on YouTube, largely specialising in SF, Horror and superhero flicks. The titular presenter is a massive fan of H.P. Lovecraft, who wrote tales of cosmic horror and madness for pulp magazines such as Weird Tales. The film is largely the work of Richard Stanley, who is best known for his SF movie Hardware. This was about a sculptress in a decay future city, whose partner finds the remains of an unknown robot in a radiation-poisoned desert. He brings it back to her so she can turn it into art. When she reassembles it, it is a lethally efficient military robot that then goes on a killing spree to fulfill its programming. The film was extremely similar to a short tale illustrated by the mighty Kevin O’Neill in 2000AD, and Stanley lost the case when the comic sued for plagiarism. Stanley doesn’t seem to have a directed a motion picture since the debacle of The Island of Dr Moreau back in the 1990s. This fell apart, and Stanley was sacked as director, largely because of the casting in the title role of Marlon Brando. Brando behaved extremely bizarrely, making odd demands and requests and seems to have been determined to have the movie shut down. With costs mounting and shooting overrunning, Stanley was sacked and the film completed by another director. The script was also written by Amaris and has superb cinematography by Stephen Annis, who has also made videos for Florence and the Machine.

Stanley is, however, a superb director and Hardware is highly praised. In this review Mr H gives fulsome praise to the movie without giving too much away. Based on the short story of the same title, this is about a surveyor in Arkham telling the story of the strange events in order to try and make sense of it. Something strange falls out of the sky and begins to change the people and environment. The humans suffer bouts of madness, but in contrast to this the environment grows ever more beautiful. The visitor from space is an alien creature, and Mr H praises the work that has gone into it. He says that the film is like Annihilation, which is also about something from space falling to Earth and changing the environment, making it bizarrely beautiful. However, H believes that the Lovecraft film is better. He also states that the creature in it is similar to The Thing, John Carpenter’s classic ’80s adaptation of John W. Campbell’s short story, ‘Who Goes There’. The creature work is excellent and it is more of a homage to the earlier film, rather than a rip-off.

There are a number of Easter eggs in the movie referring to earlier adaptations of Lovecraft’s work. One of these is the name of one of the daughters, Lavinia. I also noted scrawled on the wall in one of the video clips played in this review is the slogan ‘No flesh shall be spared.’ It’s a line from Mark’s Gospel which was used as the slogan for Stanley’s Hardware.

The film’s intended to be the first of a series set in Lovecraft’s universe. Unfortunately, it doesn’t have wide distribution over here and is only showing in Showcase cinemas. But he highly recommends seeing it, even if you have to drive several hours to the nearest cinema.

I’m a fan of Lovecraft’s fiction, which unfortunately has had a very uneven history when it comes to film adaptations. This one looks extremely promising however.

It’s on in the Showcase cinema in Cabot Circus in Bristol, and I shall hope to see it. If you’re interested, then Google to see if its playing anywhere near you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cartoon: Iain Duncan Smith as ‘Nosferatory’

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 21/01/2020 - 5:53am in

Here’s another cartoon satirising the Tories. As I’ve said in my previous pieces, I’ve taken my inspiration from Horror films and ‘B’ movies. In this case, it’s based on Hans Murnau’s 1920’s German silent version of Dracula, Nosferatu. And who better to be portrayed as the vampire than Iain Duncan Smith, a man who responsible for so many of the 130,000 deaths the Tories have killed through austerity.

 

Cartoon: Tory Flesheaters from Eton

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 15/01/2020 - 8:52am in

Here’s another one of my cartoons satirising the Tories using the tropes of old horror films and ‘B’ movies. In this instance, it’s zombie films. The two figures in the centre and on the right are supposed to be Boris Johnson and Jacob Rees-Mogg. I don’t know if Mogg went to Eton, but he’s still a public school educated toff, whose policies are still murdering the poor and so fair game. Hope you enjoy it!

 

 

Cartoon: They Saved Thatcher’s Brain

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 14/01/2020 - 6:21am in

I want to do a series of drawings sending up the Tory party and its leaders based on horror films. I thought I’d start with one about Margaret Thatcher, based on the classic ‘B’ movie, They Saved Hitler’s Brain. So please see the drawing below, ‘They Saved Maggie’s Brain’. This shows the Leaderene’s brain in a jar, with a shadow of her head beyond. The red blotches are supposed to be her blazing red eyes. I hope you like it.

“Dracula”: The Nuns Have a Point They’d Like to Make Painfully Clear to Our Count [PREVIEW]

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 01/01/2020 - 6:45am in

With Steven Moffat (Doctor Who) and Mark Gatiss‘ (Sherlock) highly-anticipated BBC/Netflix co-production Dracula set to premiere as part of the BBC’s New Year’s Day programming schedule (and on Netflix three days later), we have some new preview images for the Claes Bang (The Girl in the Spider’s Web)-starrer (which you’ll find below).

Over the course of three, 90-minute chapters, Bang’s bloodthirsty count travels from 1897 Transylvania to wreak havoc against Victorian London – with Dracula’s travels taking him through a… nunnery? Just some advice to The Count before he goes “getting thee” to that nunnery? Be careful – it looks like it’s being run by Mother Superior Buffy Summers.

draculaNetflix

Here’s a look at the BBC’s official trailer, which does away with the serious and somber tones and plays up the more horrifically fun aspects of bringing the most (in)famous vampire to (un)life:

As for the series itself, it’s set to roll out on BBC One and BBC iPlayer from January 1-3, 2020; and will also air on Netflix beginning January 4, 2020. As for the episode titles, viewers should be on the lookout for Ep. 1 “The Rules of the Beast”, Ep. 2 “Blood Vessel”, and Ep. 3 “The Dark Compass”.

Auto DraftNetflix
Auto DraftNetflix
Auto DraftNetflix
Auto DraftNetflix
Auto DraftNetflix

Here’s a look at the previously-released first-look images at the nunnery’s Mother Superior (Joanna Scalan) and Sister Agatha (Dolly Wells), a very sickly-looking Jonathan Harker (John Heffernan), new character Dorabella (Lily Dodsworth-Evans), and soon-to-be-Dracula’s-plaything Lord Ruthven (Patrick Walsh McBride).

As for Dracula’s probably-tragic-for-everyone-else-if-we-read-the-book-right trip aboard The Demeter, we meet Olgaren (Youssef Kerkour), Piotr (Samuel Blenkin), Captain Sokolov (Jonathan Aris), and Dr Sharma (Sacha Dhawan). But it’s the image of Dracula with a young woman named Yamini (Lily Kakkar) that gives us that “Mina” feeling – and that’s not good…

dracula(C) Hartswood Films – Photographer: Robert Viglasky
dracula(C) Hartswood Films – Photographer: Robert Viglasky
(C) Hartswood Films – Photographer: Robert Viglasky
(C) Hartswood Films – Photographer: Robert Viglasky
dracula(C) Hartswood Films – Photographer: Robert Viglasky
dracula(C) Hartswood Films – Photographer: Robert Viglasky
dracula(C) Hartswood Films – Photographer: Robert Viglasky

BBC One’s Dracula stems from Sherlock producer Hartswood Films and will air on BBC One in the U.K. and Ireland and then on Netflix in the U.S. and internationally.

The cast of Dracula also includes Jonathan Aris (Black Mirror: Bandersnatch), Sacha Dhawan (The Boy With the Top Knot), Nathan Stewart-Jarrett (Misfits), Catherine Schell (On Her Majesty’s Secret Service), Youssef Kerkour (Jack Ryan), Clive Russell (Game Of Thrones), Lyndsey Marshal (The League of Gentlemen), Chanel Cresswell (This Is England), Matthew Beard (The Imitation Game), Lydia West (Years & Years), Paul Brennen (Happy Valley), Sarah Niles (Catastrophe), Sofia Oxenham (Poldark), John McCrea (God’s Own Country), Phil Dunster (Humans), John Heffernan (The Crown), Joanna Scanlan (No Offence), Dolly Wells (Can You Forgive Me?), Morfydd Clark (Crawl), and newcomer Millicent Wong.

draculaNetflix

Westworld‘s Jonny Campbell is set to direct the opening episode, with Damon Thomas (Killing Eve) and Paul McGuigan (Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool) helming the second and third outings, respectively. Moffat and Gatiss are writing the series, and will also appear in the series in currently undosclosed roles. While few specifics are known about the project, the producers have stated in the past that it will be a reinvention of the Bram Stoker classic for a 21st Century audience – similar to how they approached Sherlock.

“It’s seriously delightful that our new ‘Dracula’ is being shot at Bray Studios, the former home of Hammer Films. This wonderfully atmospheric and legendary studio gave birth to so many famous monsters and stars – most memorably Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee. As we watch Transylvania once again rise on the sound stages of Bray, it’s amazing to be able to say that Count Dracula has finally come home.”

– Mark Gatiss

draculaNetflix

Gatiss, Moffat, and Sue Vertue executive produce for Hartswood Films and Ben Irving for the BBC, with Larry Tanz and Carolyn Newman representing Netflix. Filming commenced at Orava Castle in Slovakia before moving on to England and Bray Studios – once owned by iconic U.K. horror producer Hammer Films.

The post “Dracula”: The Nuns Have a Point They’d Like to Make Painfully Clear to Our Count [PREVIEW] appeared first on Bleeding Cool News And Rumors.

Modeller’s Magazine on Building Kits of Real Spacecraft

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sat, 21/12/2019 - 9:59pm in

Like many children in the ’70s I was into plastic model kits. I was particularly into air- and spacecraft, and so spent some of my free time and pocket money gluing together and painting kits of the Apollo Lunar Module and the mighty Saturn V rocket that took men to the Moon, the Space Shuttle, and a spaceship from the Science Fiction film and TV series, Buck Rogers in the 25th Century. I was therefore pleased to find looking through W.H. Smith’s magazine shelves that not only had the hobby not died out, but that manufacturers were producing models of contemporary spacecraft. You can find plastic model kits on sale at some hobby shops and in Waterstone’s, but these tend to be of military aircraft, usually, but not exclusively from the Second World War II, tanks, and high performance modern jet fighters. Spacecraft seem to be dominated by Star Wars. So it was a real surprise when I found Scale Modelling: Real Space.

The kits built and described are those of the International Space Station; the Retriever Rocket, designed in the 1950s by Werner von Braun as part of the original concept for the Moon Landings which was then abandoned; the early Redstone rocket which launched some of the first Mercury capsules; the American Skylab space station; the Chinese ‘Celestial Palace’ space station, formed from their Shenzhou-8 and Tiangong-1 spacecraft; the French Ariane 5 rocket; the Russian Buran orbiter, their answer to the American Space Shuttle, which has been built but never flown; the Titan IIIC launcher; NASA’s Space Launch System heavy lifting rocket.

Interspersed with these are articles on some of the real spacecraft themselves, written by NASA scientist David Baker. These are on the history of the ISS, how the final Saturn V launch for Skylab was very nearly a disaster, and the station became a success, and the Space Launch System rocket and its Orion capsule.

The very last model kit of a real spacecraft I built was of the Jupiter C way back in the 1990s. This was one of the early rockets that launched one of America’s first satellites into orbit. I’m very glad that people are still enjoying the hobby and building models of the real spacecraft which are carrying men and women into orbit. I was very pleased indeed when James May in one of his programmes on boy’s hobbies of the past, tried to revive interest in plastic model kits for a new generation of boys and girls a few years ago. As part of it, he built a full-scale replica of a Spitfire as a plastic model kit, complete with a dummy pilot, whose face was his own. It was cast by the artist Esther Freud, using the same techniques used to create creature masks for SF/Fantasy/Horror movies.

This issue of the magazine celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Moon landings with these kits. As NASA, ESA, India, and China again discuss plans for a return to Earth’s airless companion world, I hope the magazine and the kits encourage and inspire more children to become interested in space and the great vehicles that take us there. 

 

 

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