Jobs

Error message

  • Deprecated function: The each() function is deprecated. This message will be suppressed on further calls in _menu_load_objects() (line 579 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/menu.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Deprecated function: implode(): Passing glue string after array is deprecated. Swap the parameters in drupal_get_feeds() (line 394 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).

Talent-Hungry Companies Are Teaming Up With Historically Black Colleges

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 01/07/2022 - 6:00pm in

This story was originally published by The Hechinger Report. 

As it did in workplaces worldwide, the killing of George Floyd — just a few miles from its offices in Minneapolis — led to deep introspection about diversity and fairness at the Solve advertising agency.

The company was more than 80 percent white, and part of an industry in which Black and Hispanic employees are drastically underrepresented compared to their proportions of the population.

“It obviously pushed the entire industry to reflect, ‘Are we doing enough?’” said Andrew Pautz, a partner in the firm and its director of business development. “And the answer was really no.”

To respond, Solve looked 1,100 miles away, to Baltimore. That’s where it found a historically Black university, or HBCU — Morgan State University — that was willing to team up to create an entry-level course to introduce its students to careers in advertising.

“Advertising isn’t on the radar of diverse candidates when it really counts, when they’re trying to find a career to engage in,” Pautz said. So he and his colleagues asked: “Where is there a high concentration of diverse students? And that’s what brought us to HBCUs.”

It’s not only Solve that has come to this conclusion. So have some of the nation’s largest employers, who are descending on HBCUs to recruit the workers they need to meet diversity promises or expanding collaborations that already existed — often underwriting courses and programs and the technology needed to provide them.

These employers include Google, IBM, Northrop Grumman, Novartis, NBCUniversal, the airlines United, Delta and Southwest, and even the NFL, which teamed up last month with four historically Black medical schools to boost the number of Black team physicians and medical professionals.

“At many HBCUs, the phones have been ringing off the hook,” said David Marshall, professor and chair of the Department of Strategic Communication at Morgan State. “Given that these institutions are producing some of the highest numbers in terms of Black and brown students in some professions, it’s a natural development to come to where the students are.”

About one in 11 Black college students are enrolled in the nation’s 101 HBCUs, which produce more than a quarter of Black graduates with degrees in math, biology and the physical sciences, the National Science Foundation reports, and 50 percent of Black lawyers, 40 percent of Black engineers and 12.5 percent of Black CEOs, according to the Thurgood Marshall College Fund.

“People who have attended HBCUs, we know the value,” said Cheyenne Boyce, a graduate of historically Black Spelman College and senior manager in the Education Partner Program at the software developer and marketing company HubSpot, which also teams up with HBCUs to find interns and employees. “We’ve always known that. But it does help to have additional external validation.”

Crushed by negative news?

Sign up for the Reasons to be Cheerful newsletter.
[contact-form-7]

No one tracks how many companies are teaming up with HBCUs to find workers. But many such affiliations have been announced over the last two years. There’s been “a significant uptick,” said Marshall, at Morgan State. “It’s been deeper over the last couple of years,” said Lydia Logan, vice president for global education and workforce development and corporate social responsibility at IBM. Added Yeneneh Ketema, university relations diversity program lead at Northrop Grumman: “From what we’ve heard from our campus contacts, yes, there are a lot more companies coming there.”

This expanding pipeline to jobs with top employers could attract more students to HBCUs, whose enrollment overall declined by 15 percent in the 10 years ending 2020, according to the U.S. Department of Education — although about a third of the schools have seen a rebound in response to racist incidents at predominantly white institutions, the Rutgers Center for Minority Serving Institutions reports.

“Having companies really be willing to make investments, it benefits the students. It’s great for the parents. It’s great for the universities,” Boyce said.

For HBCU students who are lower-income or the first in their families to go to college, closer relationships with corporate recruiters and mentors also could help offset the advantage long enjoyed by wealthier counterparts who can network their way to jobs.

“I as a rich white kid might have, not just the relationships to get into the door, but also the perspective to know that working at a bank doesn’t just mean being a teller,” said Jeffrey Moss, founder and CEO of Parker Dewey, which helps employers and colleges arrange short-term internships. “Or maybe if my mom or dad works at [the management consulting firm] McKinsey, I could get a job there.

“What’s exciting to see coming out of the HBCUs right now are these opportunities to build real relationships,” Moss said.

That’s because many employers are investing more than an occasional campus recruiting visit. They’re showering HBCUs with technology and other support, mentors and money to help develop talent.

“The old model is, you bring a fancy table to the career fair and you give out brochures,” Marshall said. “The second tier is that there have always been occasional internships. The shift now is looking for more meaningful relationships.”

IBM in May announced that it would underwrite new cybersecurity centers at six HBCUs: Morgan State, Xavier, North Carolina A&T State, South Carolina State, Clark Atlanta and Louisiana’s Southern University System.

In addition to supplying academic content, the company will furnish experts to conduct guest lectures and even simulated hacking events.

“This is our next new big thing with HBCUs,” said Logan, at IBM, which already had a program to recruit students from historically Black schools.

“We’ve had a long commitment to diversity. For other companies it’s newer. For everyone, it’s gotten deeper over the last couple of years,” Logan said.

There’s not only now a social imperative for these companies, but an economic one: a huge demand for workers — not just in cybersecurity, but in other fields that require education in science, technology, engineering and math.

“We have a talent shortage,” Logan said. And “if you’re looking for diverse talent in STEM, it’s a natural fit to recruit from HBCUs.”

Consumers and activists are also pressuring employers to live up to promises that they will diversify their workforces.

“Especially for those companies that are consumer brands, their customers are saying that they want to see something happen,” Marshall said.

In some industries, such expectations can have an immediate and tangible effect on the bottom line. Nearly two-thirds of Americans say their perception of a brand’s diversity through its advertising affects whether they will patronize it, for example, according to a survey by the marketing analytics firm Marketing Charts. More than half of Black respondents said they won’t do business with a company that doesn’t represent Black people in its ads.

“Whether it’s about race or religion or gender, perspective is everything in advertising,” said Pautz, of Solve, whose clients include True Value, American Standard and Rust-oleum. Having a diverse workforce can broaden a company’s perspective, he said. “We have to understand how people think. It’s all about getting into a target audience’s shoes.”

Google’s Grow with Google HBCU Career Readiness Program provides digital education and funding to help expand the pipeline of Black tech workers, who represent only 4.4 percent of Google employees in the United States, even though 13.4 percent of the U.S. population is Black. Last year — facing criticism, including from one of its own former diversity recruiters that it previously didn’t seriously consider Black engineers from HBCUs for jobs — the company’s CEO met with the presidents of five HBCUs. Google has now added a new program called Pathways to Tech to provide those universities with technology resources.

To recruit new airline pilots, fewer than four percent of whom are Black and another 14,500 of whom the Bureau of Labor Statistics says will be needed each year through at least the end of this decade, United Airlines has teamed up with historically Black Delaware State University, Elizabeth City State University in North Carolina and Hampton University in Virginia. Delta has formed a partnership with Hampton, too, and Southwest with Texas Southern University in Houston.

The NFL announced last month that it would offer month-long clinical rotations to students from the historically Black Howard University College of Medicine, Morehouse School of Medicine, Meharry Medical College and Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science as a way to increase diversity among NFL physicians, only 5 percent of whom are Black.

“It’s really important for us to have that pipeline” from HBCUs, said Ketema, at Northrop Grumman, which also has collaborations with HBCUs and this fall will hold its fourth annual “HBCU Invitational,” during which it invites students to interview for jobs and participate in workshops and other activities.

It’s important that employers give more than lip service to these partnerships, Ketema’s colleague, Chris Carlson, Northrop’s director of university recruiting, said.

“One thing that we all know from working with HBCUs is the students can truly tell if a company is there to check a box — just showing up at a career fair to collect resumes — or if the company is in it with a school,” Carlson said.

Marshall agreed that the onus is on employers to live up to their diversity goals.

“This is not a story about HBCUs,” he said. “It’s about companies and corporations that are under increased pressure from their stakeholders, their shareholders, their customers saying, ‘You can no longer sit on the sidelines. You’ve got to do something.’ ”

“I don’t think the burden is on the HBCU side. I think the burden is on the corporations that suddenly woke up and found Jesus.”

In the meantime, HBCUs are indisputably enjoying a surge of employer interest.

“It’s great for HBCUs to get this attention,” said IBM’s Logan. “For a long time I think they were overlooked and now they’re getting the recognition they’ve always deserved.”

The post Talent-Hungry Companies Are Teaming Up With Historically Black Colleges appeared first on Reasons to be Cheerful.

The Swedish City That Asked Its Banks for an Ultimatum

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 28/06/2022 - 6:00pm in

Annie Hohlfält has lived in Gothenburg for 25 years. It’s a place she loves, but she’s also only too aware of the economic disparities bubbling beneath the surface of Sweden’s second-largest — and highly prosperous — city.

“Gothenburg is one of the most segregated cities in Sweden, maybe even in Europe, thanks to socio-economic differences that have created a kind of second class,” she says. “There are areas that are very isolated from the rest of the city. They’re not really part of the urban fabric.”

As head of development and social sustainability for Framtiden, the City of Gothenburg’s property management arm, Hohlfält hopes to change all that through an innovative project that is seeing Framtiden pour SEK 11 billion (around US $1.1 billion) into six of the city’s most vulnerable neighborhoods over the next three years. This covers 84,000 residents whose average life expectancy is around eight years lower than the average Gothenburg resident. 

With this money, the city and Framtiden have agreed on 14 “tasks” they have set out to achieve by 2025. These include a summer jobs and family support program for young people, as well as a job creation and small business development scheme, and are set to help tackle some of the neighborhoods’ biggest problems: Low education standards and high unemployment levels, which have led to widespread poverty and endemic gang-related crime rates.

Annie HohlfältAnnie Hohlfält.

Overall, the budget for improving life in these six communities has gone up 50 percent since 2019. What makes this initiative stand out, however, is the way in which the City of Gothenburg is working with its banking partners to negotiate a new way of financing ambitious projects such as this beyond the typical revenue-raising activities of taxation, fines, local service charges and corporate partnerships. 

With six major Nordic banks, the City of Gothenburg has agreed on a loan that allows the city to borrow, repay and withdraw again. Against this loan, the city will pay a higher interest penalty if its targets are not met. If it does meet its targets, it will receive a discount on the interest payments. In addition to Framtiden’s work in the city’s most vulnerable areas, separate targets include three initiatives to help Gothenburg reach its goal of becoming carbon neutral by 2030.

Tying loans like this to social and sustainable goals, with a penalty and reward structure, are becoming more popular in the corporate world. But they’re still rare when it comes to local, regional and national government bodies, which is why Gothenburg is being seen as such a pioneer.

Not everyone is behind it. Faduma Awil, who lives in Hjällbo, one of the six focus neighborhoods, agrees that boosting education and employment rates are at the heart of lifting areas like hers out of poverty. But she’s concerned that a lack of on-the-ground consultation and lived experience of what are largely migrant communities will mean this new strategy will see the same fate as its predecessors, regardless of any financially innovative reward and fine structure.

“We have 189 nationalities living in Hjällbo,” she says. “The Swedes who come here come for work then go home again. The city has put a lot of money into different projects, but after two years we are back in the same spot again because the city comes up with what they think are the solutions. They don’t listen to the people in the area to ask, ‘What do you need? How can we improve your lives?’” 

Awil came to Hjällbo in 1993 after migrating from Somalia to Sweden several years before at the age of seven. She grew up to become a social worker before taking on a coaching role at careers support center Sammjobb. 

“That’s the way you tackle a problem — togetherness — not coming in with your solution and what you think is good. You don’t know me. You cannot know what is good for me and my peers.”

BiskopsgårdenBiskopsgården is one of six vulnerable neighborhoods in Gothenburg to receive funding. Credit: Trygve Finkelsen / Shutterstock.

A City of Gothenburg spokesperson confirmed that the structure of the financial agreement meant there was no public consultation. But Framtiden’s Hohlfält adds that many of the new initiatives were developed after feedback from residents on their most pressing needs and that, when it comes to implementation, there is always consultation and dialogue. For example, Framtiden has a “tenants budget” tool through which residents can decide through a democratic process how to use a designated amount of funding.

Having been in her role for almost two years, Hohlfält is aware of past urban improvement strategies in Gothenburg which failed due to a lack of specific goals and enough funding. The difference now, she argues, is that both of those are now in place, along with the financial carrot/stick framework, giving her confidence that this new initiative can finally change the face of Gothenburg. 

“When you start talking about these socio-economic factors, it becomes so heavy and sometimes it feels like everybody’s checking out — that change is impossible, because it’s just the way it is,” she says. “But no, that is not the way, because it stems from previous decision-making, dependent on politics and civil servants. What has been really interesting is that this strategy has created momentum to bring other city organizations [including social enterprises and private enterprises] into our work, to add on their resources and skills.”

Perhaps the balancing act to Hohlfält’s optimism is the realism with which the city’s portfolio manager, Fredrik Block, approaches Gothenburg’s latest initiative. He fears the ambition of improving the city’s six most vulnerable neighborhoods will be the hardest goal to achieve in such a short space of time given, he says, tackling social issues like crime involve volatile variables that a city can’t always control. 

Likewise, he believes Gothenburg’s climate goals — reducing the energy consumption of city-run properties, converting to a fossil-free council vehicle fleet and moving to a city-wide green heating source — may be hard to reach within the next few years, although he is confident the city could hit its vehicle target by 2025, having already reached 63 percent.

Block hopes that any interest penalties paid to the banks in the short-term for failing to meet targets will be offset by discounts achieved in the longer-term as the projects gain momentum and show results.

Despite his reservations over how soon certain targets can be achieved, Block is resolute that he and his team didn’t spend months developing the plan only to retreat if things get tough.

“The targets are ambitious,” he says. “But we’re committed to reaching them.”

The post The Swedish City That Asked Its Banks for an Ultimatum appeared first on Reasons to be Cheerful.

No College? No Problem

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 17/06/2022 - 6:00pm in

At the age of 17 Latisha Carter became a single mother, putting her hopes of going to college firmly on the backburner. But she was determined to work. Three years later, after having another child, Carter became a nursing assistant, taking after her mother and aunt.

Yet she couldn’t shake her dreams of making it in corporate America.

“I felt like I disappointed my mom,” says Atlanta-based Carter. “I was the youngest kid, then I ended up having kids. I wanted to prove to everyone that I am not a disappointment.”

Latisha Carter

Buoyed by the extensive training on offer, Carter secured a call center role at software company NCR. This built up her industry experience to land a customer service role at software giant Sage in 2000. Carter’s imagined corporate success story was finally a reality and over the next 20 years she catapulted up the ranks to director level, eventually landing a senior role at accounting tech company Xero — all without a college degree.

As a director in corporate America with no university on her resumé, Carter is less of an anomaly than you might think. A recent Harvard Business Review report analyzed more than 51 million jobs posted between 2017 and 2020, and found a marked decrease in the number of employers requesting diplomas. 

This shift towards skills- and attributes-based hiring is gaining momentum in the U.S., making hiring at a growing number of companies more about what you can do than where you went to college. As student debt spirals upward and businesses struggle to find enough workers, the positive impact of skills-based hiring could be enormous for disadvantaged groups, companies and the economy as a whole. 

Skills outweigh diplomas

Job search engine Adzuna recently reviewed over 127,000 resumés uploaded to its site since January 2021. Looking across more than 2,700 job titles to assess the average market value of jobseekers with a degree compared to those without, it found that those without a degree achieved higher salaries than those with a degree in fields like IT, construction safety and chemistry, emphasizing the value of experience over education.

Paul Lewis, Adzuna’s chief customer officer, believes the change is welcome news for those who can’t shoulder the cost of attending college.

“A company that puts emphasis on skills over formal credentials will create a better foundation and culture of values, and a more diverse, well-rounded set of employees that will become a competitive advantage down the line,” says Lewis.

This is a far cry from the mentality that prevailed when Carter was starting out. Back then, she says, not having a degree in a corporate role actively held her back and she felt she had to work significantly harder than her peers to prove herself.

“Specifically, there was a time that a leader had to go to bat for me because I did not have a degree,” she says. “I honestly believe that broke a barrier across the company because he stood up for me to say I had proven myself and fought to ensure the pay was equal or better to someone with a degree. With his belief in me and my belief in myself, I was almost unstoppable after that.”

Crushed by negative news?

Sign up for the Reasons to be Cheerful newsletter.
[contact-form-7]

One of the most significant potential benefits of companies focusing hiring policies around skills rather than educational attainment is the potential it has to close the racial wealth gap.

OneTen is an organization which partners with companies to put one million Black Americans without college degrees into what it calls “family sustaining” careers — those paying $60,000 plus — over the next 10 years. Its goal is to close the unemployment gap between white and Black workers, and see companies make good on their diversity and equality policies.

According to OneTen, 76 percent of Black adults in America don’t have a college degree yet 79 percent of “family sustaining” jobs still require one, resulting in a $143,000 average net wealth difference between white and Black families. Since OneTen launched in 2020 it has helped facilitate over 17,000 hires of self-identifying Black Americans without four-year degrees into “family sustaining” roles across 70 companies.

To reach its goal of one million hires, chief executive Maurice Jones wants the number of partner companies to increase fivefold over the next three years.

“[The requirement for degrees when hiring] is a systemic barrier to folks earning their way into the middle-class American dream, all based on a credential that may have no relevance compared with the skills, attitude and aptitude you bring to a job,” he says.

“You cannot address the wealth gap in our country, which in America largely breaks down along lines of race and place, unless access to quality jobs for more folks is part of the solution. This whole skills-first movement is firmly about addressing the racial wealth gap in this country. If that’s not a significant part of your solution, you don’t have a solution.”

Carter’s employer Xero is certainly seeing its skills-based hiring approach pay off in terms of creating a more diverse company. In the second half of 2021, the company saw a seven percent increase in racial and ethnic diversity amongst new hires in the U.S. compared with the first half of that year, according to Jana Galbraith, the company’s executive general manager for people experience partnering. In contrast, she says, “historically, hiring based on degree exclusively has perpetuated discrimination.”

And, as in Carter’s case, companies need to be in a position to benefit from people’s determination and tenacity to chase their dreams, whether they have a degree or not.

“When you find someone who’s passionate about the work they’re going to be doing, you can bet they’re going to be a great colleague,” says Carter. “If we remove the barrier of ‘where did you go to school?’ that creates more opportunities for people who may have taken a non-traditional route.”

The post No College? No Problem appeared first on Reasons to be Cheerful.

Consciously Uncontracting

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 06/06/2022 - 7:00pm in

Tags 

Politics, Jobs, Labor, work

In defense of burning professional bridges.

Walmart Kills Wages

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sat, 19/03/2022 - 4:00am in

Photo credit: Marie Kanger Born / Shutterstock.com The U.S. Treasury Department released a report last week looking at the power...

Read More

State of Regions Dataset shows jobs below pre-pandemic level in over half of LGAs

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 25/02/2022 - 9:30am in

During February, .id (informed decisions) released the State of the Regions Dataset for 2021. This national dataset, released annually, provides economic and employment data for EVERY Local Government Authority (LGA) in Australia. With the economic disruption over the last few years this dataset will be one of .id’s most significant releases, as local economies work towards recovery.

In this blog, Rob explores:

 Highlights from the 2021 State of the Regions Dataset

We received the State of the Regions Dataset from National Economics (NIEIR) earlier this month. It’s a BIG dataset, with plenty of stories to tell. In this short video I share the five key findings that have emerged from our analysis so far.

Want to see how your region’s economy performed in 2021? Click here to find out.

About the NIEIR State of the Regions Economic Dataset

What is the State of the Regions Economic Dataset?

Since 1998 National Economics (NIEIR) has prepared an annual State of the Regions report for the Australian Local Government Association (ALGA) with the primary purpose of updating local councils on regional economic trends. In conjunction with the report NIEIR also produces a series of economic indicators which include comprehensive data series at the Local Government Area (LGA) level. We refer to this at the State of the Regions Economic Indicators.

The State of the Regions Economic Indicators is the country’s only economic and employment dataset that provides quarterly and annual economic and employment information at the LGA level. This means the impact of COVID-19 and other local economic changes can be clearly seen on each industry sector at the local level.

Why prepare economic data for Local Government Areas?

Reliable primary economic data sets exist only at the national, state and regional level at best. The only way to get a realistic measure of GRP, number of jobs and other economic indicators at the local area level is to undertake economic modelling. The most significant challenge with local area economic modelling is to ensure that the process reflects the unique economic characteristics of the local area, while still being consistent with State and National Accounts. A common mistake is to apply national and state-level propensities at the local level, which are no accurate as industries perform differently in different places.

This is why we have partnered with NIEIR, Australia’s industry leaders in the development and provision of robust economic modelling at the smallest credible geographic unit. Their approach builds the economic story from the ground up and is dedicated to producing quality information for local government and regional decision makers.

What’s included in the State of the Regions Economic Indicators?

The annual update of the State of the Regions Dataset includes:

What decisions does it help local government make?

The State of the Regions Dataset is intended for use in local economic development planning and project assessment and is collated from a wide variety of sources. Every year, 100s of councils across Australia use our location specific economic data to inform policy decisions, attract investment and secure grant money for essential community infrastructure.

The type of questions you can answer with these data are:

  • How is the economy performing?
  • How is the economy recovering from COVID-19?
  • How does recent performance compare to relevant benchmarks?
  • What is driving recent growth?
  • Which industries are driving recent growth?
  • Which industries are competitive and how is this changing?

Answers to these questions can be used to develop policy, seek grant funding, to support appropriate sectors of the local economy, attract investment and boost local jobs, minimising commuting time and growing the local economic base.

What are the benefits of using NIEIR’s State of the Region Dataset?

We established that this modelling was superior to any other models we evaluated for the following reasons:

 
How to get access to the 2021 State of the Regions Dataset?

The State of the Regions Dataset is available for every LGA in Australia. There are several ways to get access to the latest update.

They are:

1) economy.id (online economic profile)

The information is available at the LGA and/or regional level through .id’s online economic platform, economy.id. See the latest 2021 State of the Regions Dataset in .id’s economic profiles.

2) State of Your Region Assessment (consulting report)

This is a value-added for clients that puts the State of the Regions Dataset in the hands of our economic experts. Our economic experts are engaged by councils and organisations across Australia to provide in-depth insights behind the data. Our experts draw on their knowledge of urban and regional economic development and years of experience working with decision makers across Australia. This information is used by councils to develop evidence based economic development strategies, investment attraction plans and support grant applications. Click here for more details.

3) State of the Regions Economic Indicators 2021 (Free)

Free economic comparisons of local government areas. The State of the Regions Economic Indicators is a set of headline economic measures for every Local Government Area (LGA) in Australia. The indicators provide a snapshot of each local economy at a point in time, showing how it contributes to the broader State economy and how it is performing in relation to other areas. Click here to get access to the State of the Regions Economic Indicators.

4) Contact us

To subscribe or arrange a demonstration at your council, please email economy@id.com.au.

The Fed is About to Shaft American Workers -- For No Good Reason

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sat, 05/02/2022 - 5:29am in

The January jobs report from the Labor Department is heightening fears that a so-called “tight”...

As Job Gains Slow, the Fed and Congress Apply the Wrong Medicine

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 10/01/2022 - 2:15am in

Friday’s jobs report from the Department of Labor was a warning sign about the US economy. It should...

The Social Life of Algorithmic Harms

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 29/10/2021 - 7:21am in

Tags 

Jobs

The AI on the Ground Initiative invites applications for Data & Society’s academic workshop, The Social Life of Algorithmic Harms. Our fundamental workshop question is: 

While the ways algorithmic systems interact with and inflect social life are theoretically boundless in their local contexts and trajectories, how can the harms they produce be practically organized in order to engage them within regulatory, political, and judicial contexts and the development lifecycle? 

Together, we’ll help widen research frames and identify new categories of algorithmic harms, building the field to reflect how these are social harms (not bounded by the parameters of the technical system) and travel through social systems (e.g., judicial decisions, policy recommendations, interpersonal lived experience, etc.).

This program is currently being planned with opportunities to participate in person in New York City, online, or a hybrid of both options on Thursday, March 10 and Friday, March 11, 2022. Data & Society’s AI on the Ground Postdoctoral Scholar Emanuel Moss and Director Jacob Metcalf invite applications from Authors to workshop their academic papers, chapters, data mappings, or other outputs, and from Participants to prepare interdisciplinary feedback on the selected works-in-progress. 

Data & Society academic workshops enable deep dives with a broad community of interdisciplinary researchers into topics at the core of Data & Society’s concerns. They’re designed to maximize scholarly thinking about the evolving and socially important issues surrounding data-driven technologies, and to build connections across fields of interest.

Participation is limited; apply here by December 3, 2021 at 11:59 p.m. EST.

‘Do What You Love’ Mantra Makes People Feel Like Failures

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 19/10/2015 - 10:25am in

Tags 

Jobs

Pages