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Starmer’s Approval Rating Down to 6 Per Cent – Is Anyone Surprised?

The noxious Alex Belfield also put up a video last week in which he gleefully told his viewing public how badly Labour leader Keir Starmer was doing in the polls. According to him, YouGov or some other polling company had found that only 6 per cent of Brits think that he’s doing a good job. Actually, there might be some confusion over this, as the clip Belfield showed to back up his claim actually recorded that only 6 per cent of Brits thought Starmer was doing a ‘very good job’. It’s a minor difference, but it could mean that Starmer’s overall approval rating is actually higher, as these questionnaires commonly ask people if they think someone is doing a very good job, good job, all right and so on. Many more people could believe that Starmer was doing a good job, in addition to the 6 per cent who thought he was doing a very good job. But even so, Starmer’s popularity is low. Hardly able to contain his delight, Belfield speculated that he’d be out by Christmas. Labour was finished, especially if it elected Diane Abbott as leader.

Oh, ho, ho, ho. (Sarcasm).

But actually, if Starmer’s popularity has plummeted that far down, then there should be no surprise. Starmer has violated the cardinal raison d’etre of the parliamentary opposition – to oppose. He has simply announced that he cautiously supports the government, and wishes to give them friendly advice. When he does criticise them, it’s all with 20/20 hindsight, as Johnson has mockingly pointed out in parliament. He has no vision, no clear policies, with the exception that he’s waging war on the left in the Labour party, and so absolutely nothing to offer the great British public. And they know it.

And it shows splendidly how bankrupt Starmer’s own political strategy is. He’s a Blairite, which means that he fully supports the destruction of the welfare state and privatisation, including that of the NHS. Blair’s own election strategy consisted of finding out what would appeal to Tories or middle class swing voters and then make it Labour policy. This meant copying the Tories, or reviving failed and discarded Tory policies, like the academy schools, while at the same time telling everyone that Labour would do it better. This gained him the support of the Tory press with the exception of the Daily Heil, and Tory donors. At the same time he centralised authority in the party around himself and his clique. Party membership dropped as the views of ordinary Labour voters and supporters were ignored. But Blair was quite happy with this, so long as he had the support of the rich and the Murdoch media. As for the working class, he blithely expected them to keep voting Labour as they’d have nowhere else to go.

This failed spectacularly, as a sizable section of the British working class either stopped voting, or turned to Brexit and UKIP to articulate their alienation from contemporary parties. Starmer’s continuation of Blair’s policies, and his consequent rejection of Corbyn’s, which were genuinely popular and his determination to purge Labour of genuine socialists under the pretext of rooting out anti-Semitism are losing him working class and left wing support. He’s also losing the support of Black and ethnic minority Labour supporters through his cavalier attitude to Black Lives Matter and his studied inaction against the bullies, who racially abused Diane Abbott and other Black MPs and party activists, as well as the islamophobes.

A number of the speakers at yesterday’s Arise virtual meeting about resisting the Tories and standing for socialism in the Labour party made the point that all the talk about how ‘we’re all in it together’ during this pandemic is an utter lie. We’re not all in it together. The Tories have used the crisis, following Churchill’s dictum that you should never let a crisis go to waste, to cut services and push through policies that are making working people poorer, all with the goal of making the rich even more obscenely wealthy. The left knows this, and so aren’t backing Starmer because they recognise that he doesn’t have their best interests at heart.

At the same time, Starmer isn’t picking up Tory votes as he doesn’t really have anything to offer them either. No vision, no policies and no clear positions either. Mike’s put up several pieces about how Starmer will adopt a policy and then discard it the moment it seems unpopular. Like he was all for sending children back to school until Johnson decided he wasn’t going to send them.

I’m therefor not remotely surprised that some polls are putting Starmer’s approval rating that low. And I’d like him to be out by Christmas, but I doubt that will happen. The Blairites are determined to hang on to power anyway they can, and David Evans, the party secretary, is arrogating to himself powers to veto any Labour candidate he doesn’t think is suitable. Which means, as the good left-wing peeps pointed out yesterday, means that he has the power to stop local constituency parties choosing left-wing candidates. The various coups plotted against Corbyn and the deliberate sabotage of Labour’s election campaigning by the Blairites show that they are perfectly willing to destroy the party just to stop the left gaining power. I don’t think Starmer and his supporters will go without a very destructive, bloody fight.

As for Diane Abbott leading the party, I have my own problems with her, but I’d rather have her as leader standing to be the next PM than Starmer. She really does have the welfare of Britain’s working people at heart. But I’m enough of a realist to recognise that the press and media would have a field day reviling her, just as they’ve been doing for the entirety of her career. This would have an effect. A large number of people wouldn’t vote for her, because the Scum tells them not to. We’d need someone more acceptable to the British public, but Abbott should definitely be part of that person’s team, whoever they are.

Starmer’s popularity is waning, and this incompetent leader, who has no real policies except to advance his own faction in the Labour party, should go as soon as possible. He must be replaced by someone from the real centre of the Labour party, someone who believes in its historic policies of a welfare state, publicly owned public utilities, a genuinely nationalised NHS, decent wages and strong trade unions.

That won’t happen without a fight. But if Starmer’s popularity gets any lower, the party may not have a choice whatever the Blairites mouth to contrary.

History Debunked Calls for More Black Blood and Organ Donors to Show Black Lives Really Matter

This is another, really short video from History Debunked. It’s creator, Simon Webb, is an author, and has published several history books. He’s very definitely a man of the right, and many of his videos tackle and refute some of the myths and false history being promoted as part of the Black history movement. In this video he expresses his incredulity at the rioting and destruction of statues that broke out earlier this year with the eruption of the Black Lives Matter movement. He finds it difficult to understand how defacing a statue of Winston Churchill or setting fire to the Union flag shows that Black lives matter. Black deaths at the hands of the cops are widely publicised, but they probably occur at the rate of less than one a year. There hasn’t been one for over a year now, and they may well only happen once every 2 to 3 years.

A far greater killer of Black lives is Sickle Cell Anaemia. This can result in episodes, known as Sickle Cell crises, that can produce blindness, disability and death. They can be treated with transfusions. There are differences in the blood of different races, so that Black people are better treated with blood from other Black people, Whites with White blood. But there is a terrible, pressing shortage of Black blood and organ donors. The NHS in London and Birmingham is currently seeking 5,000 Black blood donors so that they can treat the Black victims of this disease. Whites are twice as likely to donate blood and the organs of dead relatives as Blacks, which means, for example, that Blacks on average wait twice as long as Whites on dialysis for a kidney transplant. He therefore feels that the people, who protest against a statue of Cecil Rhodes at Oxford University, instead of demonstrating against injustices that may have occurred centuries ago, should donate blood in order to show that they really believe Black Lives Matter.

Saving black lives; a way forward for the Black Lives Matter Movement – YouTube

This is obviously a controversial view of BLM. The demonstrations and riots against the statues occurred because the historic western slave trade is seen as being inextricably linked to the terrible, underprivileged conditions of many western Blacks. Institutional racism in the police has been a particularly obvious cause of anger and resentment amongst the Black community. It could be said that it doesn’t matter how low the actual numbers of Black people killed by the cops are, it’s still too many. In fact, it’s questionable how disproportionate the number of Blacks killed by the cops compared to Whites actually is. Sargon of Gasbag, the Sage of Swindon, went through the official statistics in one of his videos and concluded that Whites were in far more danger of being killed by the police than Blacks. This certainly runs counter to the allegations made by BLM. Sargon is, however, extremely right-wing. Too right-wing for UKIP, as when he joined, more socially liberal members left. I don’t agree with Sargon’s views about Trump, capitalism or how British political theory begins and ends with John Locke, but he did present a very good case on this issue.

And it is true that Sickle Cell Anaemia is killing Black people. Black people are more prone to it thanks to an adaptation in their blood cells which makes them far less palatable to mosquitoes, and hence vulnerable to the malaria they carry, than Whites. And it is true that there is a terrible shortage of Black blood and organ donors. Various Black ‘slebs have appeared on The One Show to urge Black people to consider donating blood.

Years ago I read in the book Black Pioneers of Science and Invention, that the use of blood plasma to save lives in blood transfusions was the invention of a Black American doctor, who successfully used it on Brit injured in the Blitz. It would undoubtedly be great if more Black people followed in his footsteps by donating their blood to save other Black lives.

Renegade Retrospective 2020

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 25/12/2020 - 3:01pm in

The retrospective in a year that has been quite quiet and straightforward. 

In this program we look back and bring together the best of some of our guests so you can re-live 2020 in glorious technicolor...

The post Renegade Retrospective 2020 appeared first on Renegade Inc.

Renegade Retrospective 2020

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 25/12/2020 - 3:01pm in

The retrospective in a year that has been quite quiet and straightforward. 

In this program we look back and bring together the best of some of our guests so you can re-live 2020 in glorious technicolor...

The post Renegade Retrospective 2020 appeared first on Renegade Inc.

Book Review: Embedding Young People’s Participation in Health Services: New Approaches edited by Louca-Mai Brady

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 11/12/2020 - 10:50pm in

In Embedding Young People’s Participation in Health Services: New ApproachesLouca-Mai Brady brings together contributors to explore the potential for inclusive and diverse approaches to young people’s participation in health services. This collection will be relevant reading for academics, professionals or involvement officers who would like to learn more about how to embed young people’s participation in their work. 

Embedding Young People’s Participation in Health Services: New Approaches. Louca-Mai Brady (ed.). Policy Press. 2020.

Public and patient involvement have been embedded in the United Kingdom in recent years. Research shows that participation benefits both patients and health services, and it is included within the UK’s legislation. Yet there still exists a gap between theory and practice. This is especially visible in engagement with children and young people. Involvement has no age limit and in her recent edited collection, Louca-Mai Brady brings together contributors to explore the potential for inclusive and diverse approaches to young people’s participation in health services. Brady is an expert in the involvement of young people, and this book builds on her PhD research.

What makes this book stand out among the growing literature on young people’s participation in health services is its diverse range of contributors. These include not only researchers and practitioners but, most importantly, young people themselves. The book provides an insight into what participation means to young people. Lizzy Horn, one of the young authors, explains why participation is important to her:

Knowing that I could be a part of preventing some of the struggles I had within services, for the next young people coming through them, was what motivated me to get involved in participation. Not only did I want to see changes, but I myself could be part of that change. (1)

Reading this book during the COVID-19 pandemic is timely. Public and patient involvement was often lacking in the first months of the pandemic, as there was a need for a quick response. However, Brady points out in her postscript that ‘the challenges of COVID-19 have highlighted the potential to do things differently, and develop more participatory and inclusive practice in collaboration with young people’ (18). Thus, this book is not only an example of pre-COVID engagement with young people, but should also encourage a reader to reflect on how to utilise these lessons in future work during the pandemic.

The book is structured around four related sections: young people’s participation in individual decision-making (Chapters One and Two); examples of involvement in national projects and programmes (Chapters Three to Five), collaborative research in NHS services (Chapters Six and Seven); and cases of young people-led participation (Chapters Eight and Nine). These are well-linked, and all themes are brought together in the concluding Chapter Ten, which proposes a new participation framework. Each chapter is worth an in-depth read. In this review, I look in detail at three chapters which perfectly exemplify the underlying message of embedding young people’s participation in health services. I could not put the book down once I began reading them.

Some of the contributors share personal experiences which make reading this book both powerful and inspirational. In the second chapter, Zoe Picton-Howell draws on her research and lived experience as mum to Adam Bojelian, a poet and healthcare advocate who had a severe physical impairment, in order to discuss disabled young people’s participation in end-of-life decisions. Her study is based on a survey and in-depth semi-structured interviews with paediatricians. She discusses guidance on young people’s involvement and then explores how it is applied in practice. The findings show that some paediatricians were reluctant to recognise a young person’s right and capability to take part in decision-making:

As Adam’s life and death showed, and as senior paediatricians from around the UK in my research confirmed, fulfilling young people’s rights to participate in decisions about their healthcare is not just a legal obligation, it is a matter of life and death (70).

Thus, Picton-Howell finishes with a recommendation to provide more teaching opportunities for healthcare professionals. This chapter highlights the importance of involving young people in healthcare. More information about Adam’s life can be found here.

In the fifth chapter, Lindsay Starbuck, Kirsche Walker, Jack Welch, Emma Rigby and Ann Hagell discuss how to involve seldom-heard voices among young people. They use the experience of youth engagement projects run by the Association for Young People’s Health, which is the UK independent voice for youth health. Each project engaged with one seldom-heard group, including young people affected by child sexual exploitation, young people living with HIV and young people who had weight issues. This chapter is full of quotes and case studies from young people that provide a lot of insight into the process. One of the participants of the Be Healthy project, which aimed to allow young people to discuss the health needs of youths affected by child sexual exploitation, described some of the challenges for seldom-heard groups:

One of the huge difficulties for young people getting and staying involved in projects like this is that we become known for our past experiences. I found it extremely hard to talk about my experiences and deal with the attention that it brought to me. (145)

The chapter concludes with practical pieces of advice on involving seldom-heard youth. The most important one is to check directly with young people what their needs are and then implement them. Building a lasting and trusting relationship can be a long process. Other tips include paying young people’s costs in advance (as not everyone can wait to be reimbursed) and working in partnership with local organisations who could assist in reaching diverse voices. Furthermore, the authors recommend using distancing techniques such as fictional characters for discussion. Also, creative methods such as storytelling or film can facilitate the group in raising issues while protecting the identity of participants.

In the final chapter, Brady builds on both her previous research and the work in earlier chapters to propose a practical new framework for embedding young people’s participation. She argues that successful participation must be youth-centred, and so places young people in the middle of her model. Youth participation is enclosed by what she calls ‘scope’ – ‘a series of interconnected dimensions […] all of which play a part in determining both what young people will participate in and how they will participate’ (261). These include the structure of participation, its process, frequency, where it takes place, inclusion and diversity of youth voices, power and control and learning from participation. Key questions to consider are suggested with each dimension. This model will be especially helpful for anyone who would like to embed young people’s participation in their services. The model’s design does not suggest one way to engagement but encourages users to reflect on how to involve young people ‘in ways that are meaningful, effective and inclusive’ (262).

In over 250 pages, contributors cover a wide range of examples of how to involve young people in health services. Still, the book’s insights are transferable to other areas which aim to involve young people: for example, social work, education or youth democracy. Thus, this book is relevant reading for academics, professionals or involvement officers who would like to learn more about how to embed young people’s participation in their work.

Note: This review gives the views of the author, and not the position of the LSE Review of Books blog, or of the London School of Economics.

Image Credit: Photo by Gaelle Marcel on Unsplash.

 


Simon Sideways on Israel as Rogue Nuclear State

Despite styling himself ‘Reverend’, I very much doubt that Simon Sideways is a man of the cloth. He’s a right-wing youtuber, who vlogs about immigration, feminism, Islam and the coronavirus lockdown, all of which he opposes. I don’t share his views about these subjects. But in this short video below, he makes some very disturbing points about Israel. The video’s just over five minutes long, and it’s his thoughts about the assassination yesterday of the Iranian nuclear scientist, Mohsin Fakhrizadeh. Sideways believes that it’s the work of the Israeli secret service, Mossad, and goes on to discuss their probably responsibility for a virus that attacked the Iranian nuclear programme a decade or so ago.

The virus was originally developed by the Americans, and was intended to disrupt the computer systems controlling the operation of the centrifuges used in nuclear research. The Israelis, however, decided that the virus wasn’t sufficiently destructive, so they took it over and altered it before unleashing it on the Iranians. It didn’t just affect Iran, however. It spread around the world causing havoc in all the computer systems it infected, including our NHS. When the Americans then confronted the Israelis with the chaos they caused, the Israelis just shrugged it off.

Sideways states very clearly that the Israelis do exactly what they want, to whom they want, with a complete disregard for the consequences because they will always defend themselves by accusing their critics of anti-Semitism. America can break one international law in a year, and there’s a global outcry. Israel, however, will break fifty, and there’s no criticism, because everyone’s afraid of being called anti-Semitic.

This cavalier disregard for the immense harm done by them also extends to the country’s nuclear policy. This is the ‘Samson Option’, named after the Old Testament hero. This policy states that in the event of a nuclear attack by another country, Israel will launch its nuclear weapons indiscriminately at the other countries around the world, including Europe. The point of the strategy is to turn Israel into a ‘mad dog’ so that no other nation dares attack it. There is an article about the strategy on Wikipedia, which provides a number of quotes from journalists, military historians and senior Israeli officers about the strategy. It was to be used in the event of a second holocaust, with nuclear missiles targeting Europe, Russia and Islam’s holy places.

See: Samson Option – Wikipedia

Here’s the video.

Mossad Murder inc at it agai. in Iran – YouTube

I remember the virus attack on Iran’s nuclear programme. If I recall correctly, it disabled an underground nuclear testing centre and killed 22 scientists. I also remember the crisis a few years ago caused by a virus infecting the NHS computers. I don’t know whether this was the same virus, but I really wouldn’t like to rule it out. He isn’t quite right about Israel escaping without criticism from the global community for its actions. The UN has issued any number of condemnations of Israel for its treatment of the Palestinians, which are very definitely in violation of international law. It’s just that Israel takes zero notice of them, and they aren’t enforced with sanctions. And they almost certainly won’t be, so long as Israel has the support of America, Britain and the European Community.

Sideways is right when he says that Israel responds to criticism by calling its accuser an anti-Semite. We’ve seen that in the Israel lobby’s smears against Jeremy Corbyn and his supporters in the Labour party, very many of whom were self-respecting Jews. Israel has been caught several times spying against friendly countries, another violation of international law. When Thatcher caught them doing so, she threatened to throw the Israeli spies out of the country. The Israelis duly issued an apology and amended their behaviour. They were caught doing the same under Blair and then under Cameron or Tweezer. I can’t remember which. Zero action was taken, and the Israelis got away with it.

They’ve also killed innocent people when they’ve tried assassinating Palestinian terrorists. And when I was growing up I remember how the rozzers in either Switzerland or Sweden nabbed a party of these clowns. The Israeli spies were trying to snatch a Palestinian terrorist, who was living in a block of flats. They decided the grab needed to be done in darkness, so turned off the block’s fuse box. Which plunged the entire block into darkness. Then Sweden’s or Switzerland’s finest turned up and grabbed them in turn.

This all shows that the Israeli security services are a bunch of out of control, murderous clowns. And the Samson Option shows that the Arabs and Muslims are right: it isn’t Iran that’s a rogue state. It’s the US and Israel. In his book America’s Deadliest Export: Democracy, Blum cites a Zogby poll of global, or at least Middle Eastern opinion, about whether Iran would be a threat if it had nuclear weapons. Most of those polled believed that Iran wouldn’t, and that it had a right to nuclear weapons.

The prospect of a nuclear armed Iran was worrying a few years ago, when Ahmedinejad was president. Ahmedinejad was extremely religious and belonged to a group of Twelver Shia – the country’s major branch of Islam – who believed that the return of the 12th Imam was imminent. The Shi’a believe that leadership of the Islamic community after Mohammed rightly belonged with a line of divinely inspired rulers – the Imams – beginning with Mohammed’s son-in-law, Ali. There are different sects, and Twelver Shia are so-called because, unlike some others, they believe that there were 12 Imams, the last of whom vanished after he went to a well in the 9th century AD. They believe he will return in the last days, when there will be a battle between Islam and the forces of evil. Ahmedinejad’s presidency was frightening because there was a fear that he would launch some kind of war in order to fulfil this prophecy.

But the Iranian president wasn’t the only leader whose apocalyptic beliefs were a possible threat to the world. Ronald Reagan and various members of his cabinet and military advisers also believed that the End was near as right-wing fundamentalist Christians. There was thus also concern that he would launch a nuclear war against Russia, here representing the forces of the Antichrist, to bring about the end.

Well, Ahmedinijad and Reagan have been and gone. I don’t believe that the Iranians have a nuclear weapons programme, as I explained in a post I put up about the assassination of the Iranian nuclear scientist yesterday. I also think that the Iranians were genuine when they said they were willing to negotiate and reach a deal with America. The refusal to cooperate, in my opinion, comes from the Americans, who really want regime change.

Not that the Iranians are angels in their turn. The regime is a brutal, repressive theocracy and they have been responsible for terrorist attacks against opposition groups. There’s a report on one such attack by the Iranian security services on an Iranian opposition group in Europe in today’s I. It’s just that it now looks to me that Iran isn’t, and has never been, a nuclear threat.

It looks to me like the real nuclear threat and rogue state is Israel. And the Iranians have more to fear from an invasion from America and Israel, than America and Israel have from Iran.

We can afford to choose public purpose spending

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sun, 08/11/2020 - 8:06am in
Public duty and the public purpose? Or, self-serving interest? Politicians have a choice. We have a choice.

A row of white doors along a wallImage by Arek Socha from Pixabay

The problems we face did not come down from the heavens. They are made. They are made by bad human decisions, and good human decisions can change them.

Bernie Sanders

 

In this week’s news, the economic train crash continues as it was announced that more than 7200 workers are set to lose their jobs as the pandemic continues to take lives and cause huge economic suffering to the lives of the still living with worse yet to come.

Boris Johnson said this week at one of the government briefings that we should be ‘humbled in the face of nature’, that the NHS could collapse if the government failed to heed the warnings of the experts and that he was not prepared to take a risk with the lives of British people. Those statements should have been the moment for a sharp intake of national breath in disbelief at the spinning of a story which belies a cynical sleight of hand to shift the blame from the real culprits and display feigned empathy that it has the interests of the nation at heart. Through 10 years of austerity politics, the government has willingly taken risks with the lives of British people with its policies and spending decisions which have stripped down our public infrastructure and led to over a hundred thousand preventable deaths through cuts to health and social care spending and social security reforms.

On the one hand, we should indeed be humbled in the face of nature as the consequences of human activity linked to the exploitation of resources and excessive consumption as the price for seeking the god of growth and profit begins to be made very clear. But that was not Johnson’s intention. It was yet another example of how the government manipulates the narrative through its use of words to shift the arguments away from its own disastrous policy and spending decisions that have exposed the gaping holes in our public and social infrastructure.

When the Prime Minister says we need a second ‘lockdown’ to stop our hospitals being overwhelmed, that cannot be the fault of nature. When we are short of 100,000 NHS workers of which 44,000 are nurses, that cannot be blamed on nature. When the Cygnus report published in 2016 exposed the serious gaps in Britain’s pandemic response plans, nature had no role to play.

Alluding to nature aims to take the heat off the government to make as if it were not responsible for this epic train crash of policies and spending decisions. We have limped from one mess to another; each crisis building incrementally consequences that could have been avoided. From successive financial crises to the arrival of Covid-19 and the subsequent government management of it. These were manmade not nature made, as were the disastrous solutions.

Austerity has brought us here and austerity kills and has killed. It is as David Stuckler explained in his book The Body Economic: Why Austerity Kills’

‘an economic ideology [which] ‘stems from the belief that small government and free markets are always better than state intervention. It is a socially constructed myth – a convenient belief among politicians taken advantage of by those who have a vested interest in shrinking the role of the state, in privatizing social welfare systems for personal gain.”

Our country didn’t just fall into this situation by accident; it happened as a result of a toxic economic orthodoxy which dominates policymaking at the heart of Westminster and indeed beyond nationally and globally from national governments to global institutions such as the IMF, the World Bank and the World Economic Forum. The destruction of our public and social infrastructure, in favour of market solutions, left us totally unprepared and yet still the market solutions command power. As public money continues to be dished out to non-accountable, profit-hungry companies, corporate welfare reigns at the expense of a publicly delivered, managed and accountable public service model. The corporatisation of everything is at a terrible human cost. The massaging of the public purse for corporate benefit, not public purpose. And anything goes!

This was further emphasised this week when Simon Stevens, a former advisor to Tony Blair who worked for the US private healthcare company United Health and now heads NHS England said ‘there is no health service in the world that by itself can cope with coronavirus on the rampage’. Whilst one cannot deny the enormity of this global health and economic challenge, this is yet another attempt to bypass or ignore the realities of a lethal economic ideology which has as one of its tenets the belief that cutting public spending is a necessary policy to balance a nation’s budget.

Ten years of public spending cuts in real terms, the ongoing damaging reforms to the NHS which have fragmented it and commercialised it; pared-down facilities and reduced number of beds (from 300000 in 1987 to 141,000 today), 100,000 fewer NHS workers than needed; and the failure to acknowledge the Cygnus report, has left the UK insufficiently prepared for the emergency we now have before us.

This was cruelly demonstrated by the realities of the Nightingale Hospitals which were set up to manage the predicted overspill of Covid patients once established hospital beds had reached capacity. As a Keep our NHS Public publication revealed this week ‘the need for the existence of these urgently-created hospitals is a powerful illustration of how little wriggle-room exists in our hospital system and how resilience has been stripped away by chronic underfunding’. It also pointed to the fact that the Government had also failed to mention exactly who would staff the temporary hospitals when the nursing shortage was already so acute. ‘Robbing Peter to pay Paul’ was always going to be revealed as a huge PR exercise which led people up the wrong path but could not deliver.

Stevens also forgot to mention the pursuit of the same damaging neoliberal ideology arising out of the World Economic Forum’s concern for the financial sustainability of public health care which Stewart Player covered in this article from 2017. It showed the WEF’s influence in developing a world vision for health care and whose ideas we have seen reproduced here in the UK with the help of private consultancies such as McKinsey and Co.

It particularly looked at the ‘fiscal pressures to curb expenditure’ and the ‘wider economic context of high levels of public debt and stagnant state revenue.’ It examined in particular ‘various forms of rationing and shifting the cost burden onto individuals and employers through … mandatory insurance’ or ‘increasing tax revenue’ or potentially increasing healthcare productivity ‘through delivering more services with fewer resources’ which would ‘go a long way to ensuring their financial sustainability.’

This is the same Simon Stevens who has been a significant player in the damaging reforms to a now fragmented NHS to cut costs and make it a nice profitable opportunity for private healthcare companies.

Whether we talk about the NHS, education or other vital public services which provide the foundations for a healthy economy, the public is continually being programmed to accept the narrative of the problem with public debt and the need for financial sustainability as much as it is being programmed to accept that the private sector does it better or indeed that volunteering can take the place of government intervention.

After the very necessary big spend of trillions of pounds (even if as left-wingers we can argue about the details of that expenditure) ‘there will be a price to pay’ is the mantra still being touted.

Whilst the government pours vast sums into private profit, we see an on-going denial of government responsibility for public well-being through its spending decisions. As the government’s corporate friends gain access to the public purse with no seeming limits, our public support systems are denied sufficient funding.

From its decision not to extend free school meals, lauding of public generosity in donating to food banks or other charities to its appeals to people’s human empathy with invitations to volunteer, we are being sucked into accepting these things as normal. As they reinforce the narratives of fiscal responsibility, the public is being sucked into accepting that government has no role to play in public purpose. By the time the nation notices this trickery, it will be too late. We will have fulfilled willingly David Cameron’s Big Society dream without realising where it is leading us.

Whether its Lord Stuart Rose, Chairman of Ocado, who said on Channel 4 News this week ‘We have to be able to protect our economy and generate the sort of income that tax provides so that we can pay for the hospitals, pay for the services and keep the NHS going.[…]We’ve now borrowed £400bn this year that’s £40,000 roughly for every taxpayer in the UK … it is going to be a deep hole that we are going to have to dig ourselves out of later. Let’s talk about the 20-30-year-olds who are going to have to live with that for the next 20 or thirty years.’

Or the former Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer Ed Balls suggesting that whilst governments don’t need to think about returning to austerity, spending cuts or tax rising ‘it’s gonna take fifty years or more to recover from the fiscal consequences of this pandemic and then going on to claim that ‘it was the children born in the 50s, 60s and 70s who ended up paying for the aftermath of the second world war and it will be future generations who will bear some of the burden of dealing with the pandemic …’

It shows very clearly how stuck politicians and business leaders are in the economic orthodoxy which has done so much harm already and their willingness to carry on with that harm. The suggestion that the children born in post-war years were burdened with paying for it through higher taxes fails to acknowledge that that spending created the public and social infrastructure from which they all benefited in successive years as did the pursuit by successive governments of full employment at least until the 70s when neoliberal orthodoxy began to take hold. With public ‘debt’ at 248% of GDP in the post-war period, nobody suffered, and everyone gained.

That investment which created the NHS, an education system and good local government providing essential services, all helped to enhance people’s lives and by dint of that construct a fairer economy. Later adherence to the concept of fiscal responsibility and its damaging bedfellow austerity created the exact opposite. Indeed, as David Stuckler observed in his book referred to earlier:

‘Had the austerity experiments been governed by the same rigorous standards as clinical trials, they would have been discontinued long ago by a board of medical ethics. The side effects of the austerity treatment have been severe and often deadly. The benefits of the treatment have failed to materialize. Instead of austerity, we should enact evidence-based policies to protect health during hard times. Social protection saves lives.’

Both of these public figures are promoting an idea that has had its day. If only they knew about modern money realities – or perhaps they do?

That the government:

  • is the monopoly issuer of the £ sterling
  • has to spend before anyone can pay their tax
  • doesn’t have to borrow to spend. That the term ‘borrowing’ is purely a convenient sleight of hand that suits politicians to promote to justify their spending decisions and serve corporate interests.

And that:

  • the size of deficits in themselves are not a suitable measure of any government’s economic record
  • the only burden that future generations will face is one caused by a government that has failed to invest today in the real resources whether its people or the things used in the production of the goods and services which enhance our lives and make a better tomorrow.

As Thomas Fazi, co-author of Reclaiming the State published in 2017, wrote a year later:

“One of the key insights [of MMT] is that the ‘deficit’ numbers by themselves – whether in percentages of GNP or in absolute quantitative terms – are meaningless. The government can ‘sustain’ any amount of deficit […] to pay its obligations. Of course, this is not a license for irresponsible spending. Creation of money, and its utilization in ways which do not enhance productive capacity of the domestic economy are sure to cause harm to the economy. Rather, MMT provides us with a license for responsible spending. If there are worthwhile projects which will utilize resources currently lying idle, then there is no need to be scared of the deficit numbers in spending on these projects. Viewed in this light, the project of building a million houses is not constrained by the budget of the government. Rather it is constrained by the availability of resources which are required for this purpose. If there is idle productive capacity in terms of labor, land, and materials, spending in this area will utilize them to the maximum. If the capacity does not exist, then a carefully balanced spending strategy, which builds capacity in a way coordinated with the increasing demand for utilization of this capacity, can be funded by deficit financing, without causing harm to the economy. Of course, it goes without saying that this requires skilful management and planning”.

We need to re-create a model of good government in which politicians dedicate themselves to the concept of public duty to serve the public purpose and not their corporate friends, or themselves via the revolving door.

Newly published

 

This week, we published guides to quantitative easing, or QE.

Basic information is available in our FAQs here

and a fuller explanation is in our QE Fact Sheet

 

Upcoming Event

Phil Armstrong in Conversation with Neil Wilson – Online

November 15 @ 14:00 pm – 15:30 pm

The GIMMS team is delighted to host its next ‘in conversation’ event at which Phil Armstrong will be talking to Neil Wilson

Neil is an expert in finance and information systems and one of the UK’s leading thinkers about MMT. After more than 30 years in the systems business, Neil learned the hard way that operations rarely follow the manual. Moving from network crashes to financial crashes, Neil was intrigued as to whether the economy could be fixed with a reboot – which lead him to Modern Monetary Theory (MMT). His work challenges the high-priesthood of Important Grey Men who refer to people as ‘resources’ and who believe debt is bad for government and good for you.

He dreams of a world where everyone who wants a living wage job can find one, close to their home, their friends and family.

You are invited to join us for this informal event which we are sure will be both stimulating and insightful.

Register via Eventbrite

 

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The post We can afford to choose public purpose spending appeared first on The Gower Initiative for Modern Money Studies.

Furlough till March

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 06/11/2020 - 8:32am in

Is very welcome but does it not actually indicate that further lockdowns are likely? Whilst the Harding led test and trace continues to be disastrous, we really have nowhere to go – other than open up – and then lockdown. Surely Asia – and indeed Australasia, shows us that test, trace and isolate is absolutely... Read more

Right-Wing Radio Loudmouth Alex Belfield Demands Starmer Be Suspended with Corbyn

Starmer clearly believes that suspending Jeremy Corbyn and misrepresenting the EHRC report into anti-Semitism in the Labour party were somehow draw a line between his own shabby leadership of the Labour party and that of Corbyn’s. His apologies and uncritical acceptance of the demands of the Board of Deputies for another witch hunt in the Labour party against the former Labour leader and his supporters as an effort to cleanse the party of anti-Semitism did win Starmer the approval of the Board and other Zionist Jewish groups. But not everybody has been so impressed. Right-wing internet radio host, Alex Belfield today put up this video demanding that Keir Starmer should also be suspended.

Belfield’s extremely right-wing. He’s a fierce opponent of immigration and critic of Black Lives Matter and similar anti-racist movements and initiatives, as well as general left-wing snowflakery, as he sees it. He also has a particular, personal hatred of the BBC, having worked in it for decades. He left due to some kind of dispute, which has involved lawyers. He despises the Beeb for its ‘woke’ views on race, sexism and trans rights, and claims that he was looked down upon by its overwhelmingly middle class staff and management because of his own working class origins. He therefore takes every opportunity to demand that it be defunded.

And now he turns his fire on Keir Starmer. Starmer, he says very clearly, should himself be suspended along with Corbyn. He makes it clear that it’s not for him to decide whether the former Labour leader was anti-Semitic, but not only was Starmer an MP during Corbyn’s leadership, his constituency was Holbourne and St Pancras, which was bang right next door to Corbyn’s. Starmer should therefore have known what was going on.

And he also brings Jimmy Savile and the Beeb into it. It is, says Belfield, exactly like the Beeb claimed that it didn’t know Savile was a vicious child abuser after this was revealed, despite Savile working for the Beeb for decades. But Starmer also has a personal connection to the Savile case. He was director of public prosecution when the decision was taken not to prosecute Savile for the allegations of child abuse. Allegations that have since been shown to be true.

Here’s the video.

I don’t believe for a single minute that Jeremy Corbyn was ever anti-Semitic, and neither were his supporters. But he and those accused of anti-Semitism were smeared as such because they supported the Palestinians, but not Palestinian terrorism, against the decades-long efforts to cleanse them ethnically by the Israeli state. And as Corbyn and his supporter were also traditional centrist Labour, supporting a strengthened welfare state, decent wages for working people, a state-owned and funded NHS, strong unions and a mixed economy, the anti-Semitism smears gave the Thatcherite, New Labour right an opportunity to smear and expel them.

Corbyn was a victim of a conspiracy by his own right-wing party bureaucracy to force him out. They deliberately did everything they could to throw the elections, withheld information on anti-Semitism in the Labour party, and bullied Black and Asian MPs and activists like Diane Abbot. But they worked to Starmer’s advantage, and so he has not taken action against them.

The result of all this is that the Labour party is haemorrhaging working class and ethnic minority support. As a Blairite, Starmer may well welcome this. Blair after all had complete contempt for the party’s working class base in his attempt to turn it into a second Tory party in pursuit of the middle class and swing voters. It’s also threatening to create a civil war that will cost Labour the next election.

Starmer clearly thought suspending Corbyn would win him greater approval from the right-wing political establishment. But if Belfield’s example is any gauge, he’s wrong.

Because after Corbyn they’re coming for him.

‘I’ Newspaper: Wales Getting Ready to Nationalise Railways

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 23/10/2020 - 9:12pm in

Today’s I for 23rd October 2020 has an article by Adam Hale, ‘Railways set to be nationalised’, reporting that the Welsh government is about to nationalise the railways in the principality because of falling passenger numbers due to the Coronavirus crisis. The article runs

The Welsh Government has decided to nationalise its railways following a significant drop in passenger numbers because of coronavirus.

The country’s transport minister Ken Skates said bringing day-to-day rail services for its Wales and Borders franchise under public control would help secure the future of passenger services and protect jobs.

Private firm KeolisAmey has run the franchise in Wales for just two years after taking it over from Arriva Trains Wales.

Mr Skates added that: “The Welsh Government has had to step in with significant support to stabilise the network and keep it running.”

It’s excellent that this is being done. The railways should never have been nationalised. Indeed, in Britain, sections of the rail network have had to be handed back to the state to manage almost as regularly as clockwork. Unfortunately, they’ve always then been given to another private operator because of the dogma that private enterprise is always better and more efficient than the state. Even when it glaringly isn’t, as the past four decades of dismal failure by the privatised utilities companies has abundantly shown.

There is a very strong movement for the railways across Britain to be renationalised, as shown by previous press reports about criticisms of private railway companies and the franchising system. So far, however, many of the recommendations for the system’s reform simply demand alterations to the franchising system. It’ high time this was all stopped, and the rail companies renationalised across Britain.

I’ve no doubt that the Welsh renationalisation will be successful, but it will be uncomfortable for the Tories and New Labour because of their insistence on the absolute primacy of private enterprise. If it is successful, then you can expect articles by some Tories across the border here in England recommending their nationalisation. I think Lady Olga Maitland wrote one for the Tory papers the other year. But there will also be attempts by the Tories to rubbish it, and the Welsh ministers responsible in order to put the voting public off it over here.

Because if the railways are successfully nationalised, who knows where it would stop! The state could start taking over electricity, water, gas and even healthcare. Shocking!

They also might consider it better to feed hungry schoolchildren rather than send them to school starving while wasting money on fat contracts for firms run by Tory ministers and their friends.

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