Obituary

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Bruce Kent is dead

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 10/06/2022 - 9:23am in

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Bruce became the GS of CND when it was a tiny operation in a small office in Grays Inn Road in the late 70’s, staffed by him and two very young CP-ers (Sally Davison and Chris Horrie). He had no idea what we about to hit him. Reagan’s victory, and the uptick in the cold war, prompted a huge single issue movement, which Bruce had the skill and vision to weave together and manage. I spent 2 weeks in the summer of 1980 sleeping on a floor and helping in the tiny office, and then 3 months in Fall 1981 working flat out on preparing for a huge demonstration (my main job was getting 25,000 placards made and negotating with a famous band to play on a flatbed truck for us). In my second stretch Finsbury Park was the main office, and it had all the chaos associated with growing pains. Bruce was not in the CP, and thus potentially vulnerable, especially because he was not even a fellow traveller. But he was loved, by all of us. I once asked him how to get to Orpington at a delicate moment, and he was a bit abrupt with me (I asked him because it was in lieu of him that I was going to debate a Tory MP (said Tory MP, by the way, was understandably quite disappointed to be debating a scruffy 18 year old rather than Bruce, but treated me with the utmost respect and grace, and even gave me a ride back to London). The next day he looked for me and told me that I’d caught him at a tense moment, but nothing excused him being ‘sharp’ with me, and it wouldn’t happen again. It was a better lesson for me that if he’d been utterly gracious throughout). The Garuni obit is here. It gets nothing wrong, but there’s still something a bit missing: I don’t think it quite captures the depth of affection and respect in which he was held. We all loved him.

ALso. My students are always very impressed that my first boss was Taylor Swift’s boyfriend’s great uncle, or whatever he was.

Anointing the Dead

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 23/05/2022 - 11:28pm in

Is there room for handbags in an obituary?

Joseph Raz

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 04/05/2022 - 2:47pm in

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I got a text from one of my graduate students yesterday:

You must have heard that Joseph Raz has died. Very sad. I don’t remember if I told you but I corresponded with him in December. I couldn’t believe he responded to me (a nobody) and he was very kind.

Here’s another story. There used to be two bus routes between Oxford and London, the X90, and the Oxford Tube (run by Stagecoach, in turn owned by Brian Souter, a prominent funder of the campaign for Section 28). During the period 2000-2002 I lived in Oxford but taught in London; one of my PhD students was a politically conservative, and gay, man, who also lived in Oxford and with whom, I think he’d agree, I had a rather prickly relationship at first. Like me, he used whichever bus was more convenient until, one day, he told me that he wasn’t using the Tube any more. I asked why and he said that he was standing at a bustop with Joseph Raz the previous day, and he noticed that Raz (who he recognized from having seen him give a lecture once) let the Oxford Tube go past. My student asked him why, and Raz, who didn’t know my student at all, said, simply, that he always used the X90, however inconvenient, because he wouldn’t let Souter get hold of his money. It made a deep impression on my student, and Raz’s comment inadvertently underpinned a welcome rapprochement between us. Neither of us used the Oxford Tube after that.

I didn’t know Raz at all well though I am sure some of our readers here did. But I did have the gift of taking a class from him shortly after I became interested in political philosophy. He was visiting USC’s Law school, and held the class, which was attended by exactly 4 people, in his office. We read The Morality of Freedom, which was maybe 2 years old at the time. It is not written in a reader-friendly way (to understated the facts), and its a real struggle to read, but working through it with the author, chapter by chapter, repaid the effort many times over. His unfriendly prose was at odds with his clear, and insightful, communication in the our discussions, in which he would patiently correct our misunderstandings, and respectfully, and kindly, listen to and think through our own ideas. I, in particular, must have seemed very naive, having only just encountered the field, but he never gave any sign of being irritated by that. That experience influenced my intellectual development greatly, and whenever I am irritated by naive questions or comments, I remind myself how kindly, and encouragingly, Raz treated me (a nobody).

Ann Davies 1934-2022

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 29/04/2022 - 6:36am in

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 Chuck Foster)<\/a>

The actress Anne Davies has died at the age of 87 

Ann Davies appeared in five episodes of the 1964 first Doctor story The Dalek Invasion of Earth. Davies played Jenny, the freedom fighter who teamed up with Barbara to try to reach the Dalek mines and defeat the Daleks. She was asked to dye her hair blond for the studio sessions of the story so as to contrast with the two female leads. For the earlier location filming she wore a balaclava. 

Davies appeared in many British television programmes during her long career, including parts in Grange Hill, EastEnders and The Bill. 

She was married to actor Richard Briers for over 50 years until his death in 2013. The couple appeared together in many productions including the comedy Ever Decreasing Circles and  the film Peter’s Friends. 

Ann Davies' death was announced by her agent  on Tuesday, She is survived by her two daughters Katie and Lucy Briers.

Sonny Caldinez 1932-2022

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 15/04/2022 - 8:16pm in

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Sonny Caldinez<\/a>

The actor Sonny Caldinez has died at the age of 89.

Sonny Caldinez appeared in 17 episodes of Doctor Who between 1967 and 1974. 

Born in Trinidad in 1932, then part of the British West Indies, his large and imposing frame saw him win many parts in film and television. 

His first appearance in Doctor Who came in 1967 when he played Kemel in The Evil of the Daleks, working with Jamie to free Victoria Waterfield from the Daleks.

Later the same year he played Turoc, The Ice Warrior, in the debut story of the Martian invaders.  He would return playing Ice Warriors in three more stories, The Seeds of Death in 1969, The Curse of Peleadon in 1972, and The Monster of Peladon in 1974.

Other TV roles included parts in The Champions, Jackanory Playhouse, Mind Your Language, Sexton Blake and the Demon God and The Return of Sherlock Holmes

Fim roles included parts in The Man with the Golden Gun, Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark and Lara Croft: Tomb Raider. 

Sonny Caldinez died on Tuesday 12th April. 

 

June Brown 1927-2022

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 04/04/2022 - 10:06pm in

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<\/a>

The actress June Brown has died at the age of 95.

 

June Brown appeared in the 1973 Third Doctor story, The Time Warrior, playing Lady Eleanor.

She was most famous for creating the role of Dot Cotton in the BBC soap opera EastEnders, playing the role between 1985 and 2020. 

June Brown was born in Suffolk in 1927. She trained at the Old Vic Theatre School in London. 

She was a familiar face on British TV throughout the 1960's and 1970's appearing in shows such as Dixon of Dock Green, ITV Television Playhouse, Coronation Street, Z Cars, General Hospital, The Prince and the Pauper, and The Duchess of Duke Street. 

She joined the cast of EastEnders in 1985, recommended to the producers by fellow star Leslie Grantham,  She played Dot Cotton, mother of 'nasty' Nick Cotton until 1993, returning to the series in 1997. In 2008 she became the first soap actor to carry an episode single-handed, a performance which led to a nomination for a Bafta award.

She was appointed Member of the Order of the British Empire in the 2008 Birthday Honours and an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in the 2022 New Year Honours for services to drama and to charity. 

June Brown was married twice. She is survived by her six children from her marriage to her second husband Robert Arnold, who died in 2003

Lynda Baron 1939-2022

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 08/03/2022 - 4:00am in

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 BBC Studios)<\/a>

The actress Lynda Baron has died at the age of 82.

Lynda Baron was best known for playing Nurse Gladys Emmanuel in the BBC Comedy series Open All Hours. She took part in 7 episodes of Doctor Who, one of the select few who appeared in both the original and the revived series. 

 

Lynda Baron was born Lilian Baron in March 1939 in Urmston, Lancashire. She trained at the Royal Academy of Dance and after graduating worked in reparatory theatre and in London's West End. 

It was hard work because you were constantly doing one drama, rehearsing the next one and learning the lines of the one after that. It was a great education and I am so glad to have gone through that."

Her first television appearance was in 1958, appearing in Theatre Night, the BBC series of 45-minute extracts from plays. Small roles followed including playing June in The Rag Trade and Madame Kronstadt in the thriller Breaking Point. 

Her first encounter with Doctor Who came in the 1966 story The Gunfighters. Baron played the role of narrator. Out of vision, she sang The Ballad of the Last Chance Saloon to guide the audience through the plot. 

May small roles on television followed including parts in Z-Cars Her big break came in 1976 when she was cast as Nurse Gladys Emmanuel, opposite Ronnie Barker and David Jason, in the BBC TV sitcom Open All Hours. As the object of corner shop owner Albert Arkwright's affections, Baron was a vital part of the team, appearing in all four series of the show. 

She told The Sunday Post

Working with Ronnie Barker and David Jason was unbelievable - two great actors in a brilliantly scripted sitcom. There was never a day when we did not have a great laugh ourselves and that carried on when Still Open All Hours became a series

The success of the series led to many more comedic roles including parts in Last of the Summer Wine,  Oh No, It's Selwyn Froggitt, Grundy and A Roof Over My Head.

Her second role in Doctor Who came in 1983, playing Captain Wrack, one of the Eternals, in the last two episodes of the Fifth Doctor story Enlightenment. 

In the 1990's she played Auntie Mabel in the 1990s BBC children's show Come Outside and played Grandma in the pre-school series Fimbals. Other appearances included roles in Doctors, The Upper Hand, Come Outside, Coronation Street, Down to Earth, Fat Friends and Chasing Shadows.

In 2000 she played opposite Bernard Cribbins in the BBC One drama Down to Earth about a couple who move to a farm in Devon.

Her third appearance in Doctor Who came in 2011 alongside Matt Smith playing Val Cane in the story Closing Time.

At Christmas 2013 she reprised her most famous role, playing Nurse Gladys in a one-off sequel to Open All Hours called Still Open All Hours. The show was watched by over 12 million viewers, almost a 40% share in audience figures on Boxing Day, and its success led to a series being commissioned. Baron would return to the role for a further 12 episodes. 

Throughout her career, she made many stage performances. In 1987 she was in the West End version of the musical Follies, and later appeared in the stage version of 2007's In Celebration alongside Orlando Bloom. Other theatre shows included An Inspector Calls, Stepping Out and The Full Monty.

She was nominated for a Bafta Award in 2011 for her role in The Road To Coronation Street, a one-off drama about the early days of the soap, playing actress Violet Carson. 

She was still working at the age of 80 appearing in the film Dream Horse, about a racehorse breeder

Lynda Baron's death was announced by her agent who said

Her iconic roles were loved by all generations, she was a leading light of our world.

We extend our deepest condolences to her daughter Sarah, her son Morgan and all her family,

 

 

Henry Lincoln 1930-2022

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 25/02/2022 - 10:10pm in

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Henry Lincoln<\/a>

The writer Henry Lincoln has died at the age of 91.

Henry Lincoln was the last surviving writer to have worked on Doctor Who in the 1960s. He wrote three Doctor Who stories, co-creating The Yeti and the character Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart. 

He was a best-selling author writing The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail, the book which later inspired Dan Brown's The Da Vinci Code.

Henry Lincoln was born Henry Soskin in London in 1930. He studied acting at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. As an actor, he was a regular on television from the mid-1950s appearing in programmes such as  Our Mutual Friend, Spy-Catcher, Strange Concealments, The Avengers, The Barnstormers, The Saint, Z-Cars, and Man in a Suitcase. 

He started writing in the 1960s writing an episode of The Barnstormers as well as starring in two episodes. 

In the 1960s he formed a writing partnership with Mervyn Haisman and together they were commissioned to write a six-part story for the second Doctor. The result was The Abominable Snowmen which saw the Doctor, Jamie and Victoria battle The Great Intelligence and their robot servants The Yeti. The story was so successful the team was immediately commissioned to write a sequel, this time bringing the Yeti into the claustrophobic world of the London Underground in The Web of Fear.

The story introduced a new character in the form of Colonel Lethbridge-Stewart played by Nicholas Courtney. Not only was the story highly regarded but the new character caught the imagination of the producers and would return the following year, albeit with a promotion, and become a regular throughout the Pertwee years. 

Henry Lincoln and Mervyn Haisman's third outing with the Doctor was not so successful. Their six-part story, The Dominators would cause a permanent rift with the BBC following an argument over who owned the characters The Quarks. The story was rewritten and reduced to five episodes resulting in the writers asking for their names to be removed from the credits. The story was transmitted under the pseudonym Norman Ashby. 

In 1969 Lincoln was traveling in France when he became intrigued by the local story of a great treasure being hidden in the region. His research lead to a series of documentaries for the BBC and a book The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail which became a bestseller in 1982, co-written with Richard Leigh and Michael Baigent. 

Some of the ideas put forward in the book were later used by the author Dan Brown in his bestseller The Da Vinci Code. A High Court case against Brown, taken by his co-writers, failed. 

Lincoln returned to the subject of ancient hidden treasure in a series called The Secret, which screened in 1993.

In 2003, Lincoln was awarded an Honorary Knighthood in the Militi Templi Scotia order, in recognition of his work in the fields of sacred geometry and Templar history. 

 

 

 

 

 

Stewart Bevan 1948-2022

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 22/02/2022 - 9:31am in

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 Katy Manning)<\/a>

The actor Stewart Bevan has died at the age of 73.

Stewart Bevan appeared in the 1973 Doctor Who story The Green Death, playing Professor Clifford Jones

Jones was the leader of the Nuthatch community who ended the story by marrying Jo Grant, played by his then-girlfriend Katy Manning. 

Bevan was in London to Welsh parents. His love of amateur dramatics led him to seek a career in the theatre and he trained at the Corona Theatre School. 

One of his first roles was in the film To Sir With Love starring Sidney Poitier. Other film credits include Lock Up Your Daughters!,  Burke & Hare, The Flesh and Blood Show, and Steptoe and Son Ride Again.

His television career was extensive, appearing in shows such as Emmerdale Farm, where he played Ray Oswell, Shoestring, Blakes 7, The Onedin Line, Ivanhoe, Nanny, Casualty, Grange Hill,  The House of Eliott, and Brookside

His former co-star, close friend, and ex-partner Katy Manning posted this tribute on twitter <\/a>

The most beautiful man poet actor screenwriter husband ❤️& father to @CoralBevan ❤️@Misswendybevan ❤️went on his awfully big adventure. He was the love in my life for many years on & off-screen & our wonderful friendship continued to the end 

 

Barry Cryer is dead.

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 28/01/2022 - 2:01am in

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If you are anywhere close to my age (and even for most of you who are not), and if you grew up in the UK, Barry Cryer almost certainly made you laugh, even if you never knew who he was. He wrote for everyone. Well, everyone that mattered. And even plenty of people who didn’t matter (sorry, but I have never understood the appeal of Bob Hope. Or Kenny Everett to be honest). ISIHAC was, I suppose, his masterpiece. When I am feeling down, even when I am feeling really really down, I know that if I listen to ISIHAC I will laugh (the day I don’t know that ISIHAC will make me laugh is the day I’ll wonder if life is worth continuing [1]). However funny Cryer was on ISIHAC, and he was always hilarious, the best thing was not him being funny, or anyone else being funny, but hearing him laughing at other people being funny. His sheer, authentic, enjoyment of other people was delightful. Over the next few days the stories of his role in promoting other people’s careers — and in particular the careers of various women in comedy (the great late Linda Smith springs to mind)– will dribble out. Enjoy them and take note.

I once bumped into him. It was December 2001, and we were attending The Nutcracker in the west end. I had agreed to meet my family, and just before getting to the meeting spot I found myself standing right next to him — he loitering with a fag and a phone. My immediate thought was just to thank him for making me laugh so often, and when I really needed it. But being English, I just nodded in recognition, and moved on.

Here’s the grauniad obit.

[1] After writing that I realise it might sound like I’m being flippant about mental illness. I’m not.

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