reading

Sunday, 28 April 2019 - 3:12pm

Published by Matthew Davidson on Sun, 28/04/2019 - 3:12pm in

This week, I have been mostly reading:

Sunday, 14 April 2019 - 7:03pm

Published by Matthew Davidson on Sun, 14/04/2019 - 7:03pm in

This week, I have been mostly reading:

Sunday, 7 April 2019 - 3:03pm

Published by Matthew Davidson on Sun, 07/04/2019 - 3:03pm in

This week, I have been mostly reading:

Sunday, 31 March 2019 - 8:50pm

Published by Matthew Davidson on Sun, 31/03/2019 - 8:50pm in

This week, I have been mostly reading:

Sunday, 17 March 2019 - 1:51pm

Published by Matthew Davidson on Sun, 17/03/2019 - 1:51pm in

This week, I have been mostly reading:

Sunday, 10 March 2019 - 5:45pm

Published by Matthew Davidson on Sun, 10/03/2019 - 5:45pm in

This week, I have been mostly reading:

Sunday, 3 March 2019 - 9:30pm

Published by Matthew Davidson on Sun, 03/03/2019 - 9:30pm in

This fortnight, I have been mostly reading:

A Rarely Realized Classroom Ideal

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sat, 23/02/2019 - 8:25am in

Last night, in my graduate seminar–which carries the snappy title ‘From Schopenhauer to Freud (Via Nietzsche): Depth Psychology and Philosophy‘–my students and I spent the entire two hours of our class meeting time reading and discussing Section 354 of Nietzsche‘s The Gay Science. We each had a copy of the section in front of us; I read its text out aloud in class, pausing to offer commentary and elucidation and inviting similar interjections from my students. In the closing half-hour or so of class time, we discussed a pair of written responses to the section 354. (My students write responses to the assigned reading every week; this week while the primary readings were all secondary sources on Nietzsche, I had asked my students to base their responses on the primary Nietzsche texts invoked in these sources.)

It is no secret. to me at least, that the class meeting I described above comes close to an imagined ideal for a philosophy class meeting: I assign a text to be read; my students do the reading and have intelligent responses to it; in class we ‘work through the text’ diligently and patiently, reading every single word carefully, bringing out the texts many meanings and allusions and implications. Rarely is such an ideal realized; that is precisely what makes its rare occurrences even more pleasurable. Once, over the course of a semester in an undergraduate Social Philosophy class, my students and I achieved this ideal repeatedly; the secrets of that ‘success,’ were that my reading assignments were short and my class included a few ‘bright lights’ who came to class prepared and ready to dig into the material with me.

The reasons why such a class meeting represents an ideal for this teacher of philosophy should be evident from my descriptions above. My students and I ‘encounter’ the text in the way its writer intended it to be: sympathetically. This does not mean eschewing criticism of the text, but rather, “by looking at reality in the light of what it is saying.” From a personal perspective, as I’ve noted here previously, my understanding of a philosophical text is considerably enriched by these discussions with my students. A good  discussion with my students always lets me know there is more going on in the text than I might have imagined.

Our task was made easier, of course, by the text and its writer. Nietzsche always repays close attention and his language is extraordinarily rich (and to think that we were reading him in translation!) As he almost always does, Nietzsche sends out a message to all future writers and philosophers: if you want to read be with such attention and care, you would do well to follow him–in your own way!–on his chosen path. Write clearly and joyfully, letting your readers know that your writing represents a genuine attempt on your part to work through the problem at hand–which should always, always be a problem for you too, and not an idle academic pursuit.

 

 

Sunday, 17 February 2019 - 2:01pm

Published by Matthew Davidson on Sun, 17/02/2019 - 2:01pm in

This week, I have been mostly reading:

Sunday, 3 February 2019 - 5:05pm

Published by Matthew Davidson on Sun, 03/02/2019 - 5:05pm in

This week, I have been mostly reading:

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