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The war in Ukraine: opposing imperialism East and West

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sun, 27/03/2022 - 10:55pm in

Dragan Plavšić and Anja Ilić discuss the war in Ukraine, its causes and consequences and how socialists should respond

Putin must be given a golden bridge from which to escape – On Democracy Now!, with Amy Goodman

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sat, 26/03/2022 - 6:30pm in

The only way of ending the killings, the injuries, the destruction of Ukraine and a permanent quagmire in Europe that threatens world peace, is a rational solution that will leave everybody slightly dissatisfied. “What is exactly the alternative? Is it regime change in Russia?” “Well, whenever the United States tried regime change, it didn’t turn out very well and has never been tried with a nuclear power. This is like playing with fire.”

Transcript, courtesy of Democracy Now! Click here for the original post

This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AMY GOODMAN: This is Democracy Now!, democracynow.org, The War and Peace Report. I’m Amy Goodman.

The European Union has signed a new deal to import more liquefied natural gas from the United States, in the latest move by NATO allies to further isolate Russia following its invasion of Ukraine. The gas deal was announced a day after President Biden took part in emergency meetings of NATO, the G7 and the European Council. During a press conference in Brussels, Biden announced new sanctions against Russia.

PRESIDENT JOE BIDEN: We’re also announcing new sanctions of more than 400 individuals and entities, aligned with — in alignment with the European Union: more than 300 members of the Duma, oligarchs and Russian defense companies that fuel the Russian war machine.

AMY GOODMAN: President Biden is in Poland today, where he’s scheduled to meet with U.S. troops, as well as Ukrainian refugees. According to the United Nations, more than 3.6 million Ukrainians have fled the country since the Russian invasion began a month ago. On Thursday, President Biden announced the United States will accept up to 100,000 Ukrainian refugees.

In the latest news from the battlefield, Russia is claiming it’s destroyed a military fuel depot outside Ukraine. It’s one of Ukraine’s largest.

Meanwhile, local officials in the besieged city of Mariupol say they fear 300 people died last week in a Russian airstrike on a theater, which was being used as a shelter. Outside, the words “child” were on either side of the building facing upward; the words were written in Russian.

This comes as the Ukrainian government is asking the United States to start providing 500 Javelin and 500 Stinger missiles a day to help Ukrainian forces fight the Russian invasion.

We begin today’s show with Yanis Varoufakis, member of the Greek Parliament, former finance minister of Greece, founder of the Progressive International with U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders. He’s joining us from Athens.

It’s great to have you with us. Thanks so much for joining us, Yanis. If you can respond to this triple summit yesterday in Brussels — of NATO, of the EU, the European Union, and of the G7 — of the increased sanctions and, overall, what this war means?

YANIS VAROUFAKIS: There is an unprecedented show of unity within the West, but what is lacking are two things, Amy, if I may say — firstly, an appreciation of the fact that the rest of the world is not showing complete alignment with the West. This is an understatement. Even though the majority of countries in the United Nations voted against Russia, if you look at the countries that didn’t, they contain more than half of the population of the world, including not just China but also India and many other countries.

The second thing that’s missing from this show of strength, and the impressive sanctions that have been agreed against Putin and his henchmen, is a game plan. Exactly what is President Biden aiming for? Yes, it is important for him and for his government, for his administration, to show support for the Ukrainians, to provide Stinger missiles, to provide economic sanctions for Putin, which of course we know are not going to debilitate the Putin regime. But what is exactly the aim? Is it regime change in Russia? Well, whenever the United States tried regime change, it didn’t turn out very well, and has never been tried with a nuclear power. This is like playing with fire, or nuclear fire, I should say. If it’s not regime change, what exactly is it?

And so, allow me to just say this, that the famed philosopher and military strategist from China, Sun Tzu, once said that if you are faced with a formidable enemy whose total defeat is going to kill many or most of your people, as well, what you should do, Sun Tzu said, was to build a golden bridge behind your enemy from which your enemy can escape, to give him an opportunity to withdraw while claiming that he has achieved something. Now, Biden, by proclaiming that Putin is a war criminal — I have no doubt that Putin is a very nasty piece of work; I’ve called him a war criminal 20 years ago over his massacre of Chechens in Grozny — but what is the leader of the United States doing? What is he aiming at? Because if he is not leaving any room for a compromise, then he is effectively jeopardizing the interests of Ukrainians, because a quagmire in — an Afghanistan-like quagmire in the Ukraine is not exactly in the interests of any Ukrainian I know of.

AMY GOODMAN: So, if you could talk about specifically what’s being targeted and this commitment to end the reliance on Russian energy, that is so difficult for Europe right now? I mean, it seems like at this moment, this is the moment that so many green activists, like yourself, have felt could be a shift toward renewables, but instead it looks like: How can other countries, like the United States and Canada, fill in the fossil fuel emergency that’s taking place right now? But what this means for Russia, what this means for the rest of the world?

YANIS VAROUFAKIS: I think the West is inflicting major political and environmental damage on itself, whereas Mr. Putin, being a cynical agent that he is — a KGB strategist, let’s not forget — I have no doubt he was planning for all this. In the end, we’re going to damage the planet and the West more than we’re going to damage Putin, because Putin doesn’t really care much about Russians. He cares about himself.

And I can see a game plan here on behalf of Vladimir Putin. Let’s not forget that, as we speak, around $600 million to $700 million is being sent to Mr. Putin for the oil and gas that he’s selling the West. The plans that you mentioned for transporting liquefied natural gas from Texas and from Qatar to Europe, that concerns next winter, not this winter. Are we going to sacrifice the Ukrainians until next winter? This is the great question. And also, as we speak, Russia has found ways of bypassing the sanctions. We know that they’re dealing with counterparties in China, in India. A lot of dollar payments are being made to the Putin regime through these intermediaries.

I would very much have preferred for us to be discussing — you and me now, but the whole world — to be discussing President Biden’s proposals for a resolution that would mean an immediate ceasefire and an immediate withdrawal from the Ukraine in exchange for some kind of deal that Putin can sell to his own henchmen as something of a victory. Instead of that, Biden is doubling down, and he’s speaking in language which is consistent with regime change, which will be catastrophic for the people of Ukraine.

AMY GOODMAN: So, explain this further. You’re saying Biden should be sitting down with Putin, that Biden represents the United States, the world’s largest superpower, and could lead to a ceasefire. What isn’t he doing?

YANIS VAROUFAKIS: That. Look, I wish — as a European and a Europeanist and internationalist, I wish the European Union existed in substance, so that, you know, the president of the European Union could be sitting down with Putin. But we don’t have that. The European Union is a disunion, really. So, Biden is the only representative of NATO, of the West at the moment. I’m not going to pass judgment on the gentleman. He is, however, the only one who can sit down with Putin. They can talk on the phone, to begin with, before they actually sit down. Their foreign ministers will have to come to these exchanges.

But the idea must be really very simple: Putin must be given a golden bridge from which to escape his conundrum. He must be given something he can sell to his own people as mission accomplished. The only thing we can do, as democrats and internationalists, we should be able to tolerate, is the neutrality of the Ukraine, because this is a tiny, tiny, nonexistent price to pay for ending the war, having Russian troops evacuate the Ukraine, some kind of arrangement to be established for the Donbas area — we could kick into the long grass the question of Crimea; it could be shelved, something to be discussed in 10 years or so — in order to stop the killing and to stop the toxicity which is spreading from Ukraine across Europe, across the United States. I’ve been hearing senators in the United States, members of parliament of various European countries calling for NATO to intervene — because we know what that will mean. It will mean that the nuclear threat is going to reach levels that we haven’t seen since the Cuban Missile Crisis. We should be moving towards a rational solution that will leave everybody slightly dissatisfied — the Ukrainians, the Russians, me, you, Biden, Putin — but which will end the killing and will lead to an independent, democratic Ukraine.

AMY GOODMAN: You write in a recent article headlined “Why Stop at the Russian oligarchs?” “Perhaps the only silver lining in the Ukrainian tragedy is that it has created an opportunity to scrutinize oligarchs not only with Russian passports but also their American, Saudi, Chinese, Indian, Nigerian, and, yes, Greek counterparts. An excellent place to start would be with the London mansions that Transparency International tells us sit empty. How about turning them over to refugees from Ukraine and Yemen?” Talk more about this.

YANIS VAROUFAKIS: For many, many years now, we’ve all known, through the Panama Papers, through a variety of leaks of Transparency International, that our oligarchs, the oligarchs of this planet — the Russians, the Qataris, the Saudis, the Americans, the Greeks — they have been absolutely abusing our societies, our states, our tax systems. Yes, the Russians are pretty ugly in what they’re doing. They have plundered, in a very short space of time, the mineral resources, the industries of Russia, after the collapse of the Soviet Union. And they have bought their mansions in London, football teams and so on.

So, you know, it’s a wonderful opportunity — the fact that the Ukraine has concentrated our minds on what the Russian oligarchs are doing — to contemplate moving beyond them, because Russian oligarchs, it has been estimated, have taken $200 billion out of Russia, you know, looted money, plundered money, but American oligarchs have taken $1,200 billion out of the jurisdiction of the United States of America, hiding it from the IRS. And they are not much nicer people than the Russian oligarchs, I have to say. They have not protested the massacres of Yemenis in Saudi Arabia. They have not protested the killing of journalists, like Khashoggi in the Saudi Arabian Embassy or Consulate in Constantinople — in Istanbul, I should say. They have not lifted their little finger to help us fund the green transition. Why should we not extend our newly found antipathy towards oligarchs, who have been defrauding and plundering our countries — why not extend it to people beyond Russia?

AMY GOODMAN: Let me ask you about some criticism that’s been leveled against your position right now, Yanis. I want to ask your response to a piece that was in The New Republic titled “’Neutrality’ Won’t Protect Ukraine.” The authors mention you, writing, “An increasing number of international commentators are also arguing neutrality might be a reasonable way to end the bloodshed quickly, by offering Putin a face-saving ‘off-ramp’ for the invasion. Ostensibly progressive voices like former Greek Minister of Finance Yanis Varoufakis have called for the ‘Finlandization’ of Ukraine, referring to Finland’s quasi-forced neutrality during the Cold War; the Russians have suggested Austria, which was formally neutral but maintained trade relations with both the United States and the Soviet Union, as a model for Ukraine.” Can you respond to what they’re saying? Also right now Finland is talking about possibly joining NATO.

YANIS VAROUFAKIS: Well, let’s take Finland, shall we? Finland had a war with Russia, with the Soviets. There was a stalemate, very much like what we have now in Ukraine. And the result was neutrality. There was an agreement between Washington, on the one hand, and Moscow, on the other, that Moscow would not interfere with Finland, it would not invade, it would take its troops out, and Finland would be allowed to live an independent, Western, democratic lifestyle, as long as it doesn’t join NATO and it doesn’t host American or European armies in its territory. The result was a wonderful state, a country, you know, that in every ranking outranks your country, the United States, my country, Greece, when it comes to education, to democracy, to technological innovation. Remember Nokia and all the great companies that came out of Finland. Finland is a success story. Neutrality allowed Finland to have democracy, independence and success and shared prosperity, a social democratic country, similarly with Sweden, similarly with Austria. So it’s a well-tested and well-tried-out model.

The reason that Ukraine has not had the same opportunity so far — because some people will say that — it’s been said that they gave up their nuclear weapons, they were not in NATO, therefore they were neutral, and nevertheless they suffered incursions and now this invasion by Mr. Putin. Well, it wasn’t the same. What Ukraine lacks is a summit, a summit between the American president and the Russian president, a summit involving the government of the United States and the government of Russia. This is what Finland had, what Austria had. The two blocs, NATO and the Warsaw Pact, represented by the president of the Soviet Union, or the general secretary of Communist Party then, and the American president, or a series of American presidents, they agreed — they shook hands — that Finland, Sweden, Austria will be left alone, under conditions of neutrality, to prosper democratically and to be part of the West without being part of NATO.

Now, a similar arrangement, in my view, has a very good chance of granting the Ukrainians the space, the independence and the democracy they need. Now, there are no guarantees. I cannot predict the future. But can the critics, who are, as you said, chastising me for adopting and promoting the neutrality solution — can they tell me what the alternative is? Because the only alternative they can come up with is regime change in Moscow. Well, this will take 10 years, five years, eight years. What do we do with the Ukrainians who are dying until then? Are you — this is my question to them — prepared to sacrifice their lives and a fantastic chance of a successful neutrality outcome? Are you prepared to sacrifice all that for the purposes of regime change?

And I’ll say this once again, Amy — I’m addressing the people in the United States: How many times have an attempt by the American government to effect regime change anywhere in the world worked out well? Ask the women of Afghanistan. Ask the people of Iraq. How did that liberal imperialism work out for them? Not very well. Do they really propose to try this out with a nuclear power?

AMY GOODMAN: Yanis Varoufakis, I want to thank you for being with us — we’re going to have to leave it with that question — member of the Greek Parliament, former finance minister of Greece, founder of the Progressive International with U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders.

The post Putin must be given a golden bridge from which to escape – On Democracy Now!, with Amy Goodman appeared first on Yanis Varoufakis.

My reply to the Charge of Westsplaining Eastern Europeans

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 23/03/2022 - 10:36am in

Tags 

English, Video

The horrific war Putin unleashed against Ukraine has also caused collateral damage within the ranks of the left. No sooner had I, and other DiEM25 comrades (including Noam Chomsky and Naomi Klein), began campaigning for a peaceful resolution of the war based on the principle of an independent but neutral Ukraine than a charge of ‘Westsplaining’ was levelled at us from Eastern European comrades.

The Accusation: That Western left-wingers (like myself) and liberals condescend to explain Eastern Europe, and its predicament, to Eastern Europeans.

Different oppressions yield different sensitivities: Undoubtedly, each one of us carries different historical baggage. I, being Greek, grew up in a US-led fascist dictatorship within a NATO that collaborated with our fascist rulers. Poles and other Eastern European laboured under a Soviet-communist dictatorship. So, naturally, we, Greek left-wingers, tend to be more critical of NATO, waging criticisms that to Poles and other Eastern Europeans seem out of place. Such differences in perspective are, of course, perfectly natural and legitimate.

Denying Eastern Europeans agency? The main argument of my accusers is that I have denied Eastern Europeans agency, focusing instead on the interests and perspectives of the West, on the one hand, and Putin, on the other. That I suppressed the views and perspectives of Eastern Europeans . The prosecution’s Exhibit A is that I have not acknowledged the fact that significant majorities supported the entry into NATO of Eastern European countries. So, they claim, their entry was democratically legitimised and, thus, it is condescending to say that NATO expanded eastwards when, in reality, it was invited to move eastwards by Eastern Europeans themselves.

I have no doubt that majorities wanted to enter NATO. But, while this is an important factor, it begs the question: Does it mean that I, as a Greek left-winger, have no right to oppose NATO’s eastward expansion just because a majority of Eastern Europeans consented to it? It most certainly does not. Why is condescending for me to say to my friends in Poland, Ukraine etc. that they are wrong to consent to NATO’s expansion? As a Greek left-winger, I often oppose tooth-and-nail views and decisions favoured by a majority of Greeks – it’s called conviction politics, something we should have a lot more of. Unless, of course, those who are charging me with ‘westsplaining’ want to argue that I can contradict what a majority of Greeks want but not what a majority of Eastern Europeans want. But this would, I submit, violate every principle of progressive internationalism. Indeed, the whole point of DiEM25 and of our Progressive International is that we come together as citizens of the world who have a view on every country, not just their own.

Two conflicting hypotheses about NATO and War: My accusers reject my (and many others’) hypothesis that, had the United States and NATO not adopted in the 1990s an aggressive stance against Russia, there would have been no war in the Ukraine today and, more generally, no dangerous tensions in Eastern Europe. They counter-propose their own hypothesis: that, even if NATO had stayed put or even disbanded in the 1990s, Russia would be invading its neighbours – perhaps with greater ferocity.

Like all counterfactuals, these are untestable hypotheses – we shall never know, empirically, what might have happened had NATO not expanded eastwards, beginning with Poland.

Since I cannot convince my accusers that their hypothesis is wrong, and vice versa, I would have expected mutual respect of each other’s argument to prevail. In the same way that it would be inexcusable for me to attach a dismissive label on them, it is unwarranted for them to attach on me the label ‘westplainer’ – unless they truly believe internationalism to mean that local majorities know best or that respect demands that a Greek not only listens to but also agrees with the majority of Poles or Czechs or any other Eastern European people.

If we had managed to hold a rational and comradely dialogue, here is what I would have told them about Putin and NATO: In the same way that the radical centre (e.g., Emmanuel Macron, Angela Merkel, Mario Draghi) need the ultra-right (e.g., Orban, Meloni, Le Pen, Vox) in order to get elected and gather support, while the ultra-right needs the inequality the radical centre’s austerian policies generate in order to stir up the discontent that feeds them – similarly, Putin needs NATO and NATO needs Putin.

Left-wingers, in the East, West, North and South should not find any of this hard to digest. Lefti-wingers understand, above all else, the dialectic relationship between cross-border authoritarianisms: Putin needs the Azov Battalion, to justify his cruelty, and the Azov Battalion needs Putin, to justify theirs. Putin rose to unlimited power due to the mass poverty caused, largely, by US-led (through the IMF) callousness in demanding full repayment of the USSR’s debts by a collapsed post-Soviet Russia. NATO justifies its existence as supplier of security, because of the insecurity it helped breed through its expansion – following America’s role in immiserating the majority of Russians.

Enough said on this. As I admitted above, I could be wrong and an honest disagreement on these assessments is legitimate. Name calling between comrades is not.

ON THE SUBSTANCE OF THINGS

Because people are dying and rockets are flying, these debates between left-wingers are a luxury humanity can ill-afford – at least until the war is over. Meanwhile, we need to work toward ending the invasion and effecting an agreed withdrawal of Russian troops from Ukraine.

My involvement in this debate began because, from the outset, I advocated for the Independent-Neutral Ukraine solution, in juxtaposition to a Ukraine sticking to a NATO membership aspiration that even the US does not want to fulfil. For my pains I was labelled a ‘westsplainer’. Let’s, for argument’s sake, say that I was wrong – that an independent-neutral Ukraine is not what Ukrainians want. [Even though President Zelensky has now embraced the very proposal I have been advocating for.] What is the alternative that those who dismiss me as ‘yet another westsplainer’ propose? Overthrowing Putin? Are they seriously suggesting that the people of Ukraine should continue to die until Putin is overthrown? Are they seriously declaring a willingness to sacrifice Ukrainians on the altar of some theoretical right to join NATO?

Two brief points with which to conclude:

  1. Eastern Europe will become peaceful and democratic only after the authoritarian, racist autocrats ruling over it are removed – in Russia, in Poland, in Hungary, in the area where the Azov battalion operates etc. NATO will not help with any of this because, either willingly or unwillingly, it feeds these monsters.

  2. Those of us on the left with a long memory, we remember our long tradition of being mortally split by imperialist wars. We remember the 2nd International and how the Great War caused it to split up. We recall how the left never really recovered since then. We must not repeat this. Not calling each other names is an excellent start!

The post My reply to the Charge of Westsplaining Eastern Europeans appeared first on Yanis Varoufakis.

How We Stop a Gerrymandering CatastropheEarlier this month, the...

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 21/03/2022 - 12:04pm in

How We Stop a Gerrymandering Catastrophe

Earlier this month, the Supreme Court overturned a lower court’s ruling and allowed Alabama’s egregious gerrymandered Congressional map to remain in place.

There’s no reason to sugarcoat this. Across the country, Republican state legislatures are using extreme gerrymandering to cement their power for decades, and the window to stop them is closing fast.

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Btw, if you’d like my daily analyses, commentary, and drawings, please subscribe to my free newsletter: robertreich.substack.com

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Senate Democrats must use every tool at their disposal to pass the Freedom to Vote Act and the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act before the GOP rigs their way back to power in the midterms.

Know the truth about how we got into this gerrymandering mess - and what we can do to get out of it.

Our best shot at saving our democracy is right now. It’s time to act.

The Hidden Link Between Corporate Greed and InflationInflation!...

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sat, 19/03/2022 - 1:37am in

The Hidden Link Between Corporate Greed and Inflation

Inflation! Inflation! Everyone’s talking about it, but ignoring one of its biggest causes: corporate concentration.

Now, prices are undeniably rising. In response, the Fed is about to slow the economy — even though we’re still 2 million jobs short of where we were before the pandemic, and millions of American workers won’t get the raises they deserve.

Meanwhile, Republicans haven’t wasted any time hammering Biden and Democratic lawmakers about inflation.

Don’t fall for their fear mongering.

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Btw, if you’d like my daily analyses, commentary, and drawings, please subscribe to my free newsletter: robertreich.substack.com

******

Everybody’s ignoring the deeper structural reason for price increases: the concentration of the American economy into the hands of a few corporate giants with the power to raise prices.

If the market were actually competitive, corporations would keep their prices as low as possible as they competed for customers.

Even if some of their costs increased, they would do everything they could to avoid passing them on to consumers in the form of higher prices, for fear of losing business to competitors.

But that’s the opposite of what we’re seeing. Corporations are raising prices even as they rake in record profits. Corporate profit margins hit record highs last year. You see, these corporations have so much market power they can raise prices with impunity.

So the underlying problem isn’t inflation per se. It’s a lack of competition. Corporations are using the excuse of inflation to raise prices and make fatter profits.

Take the energy sector.

Only a few entities have access to the land and pipelines that control the oil and gas  powering most of the world. They took a hit during the pandemic as most people stayed home. But they are more than making up for it now, limiting supply and ratcheting up prices.

Or look at consumer goods.

In April 2021, Procter & Gamble raised prices on staples like diapers and toilet paper, citing increased costs in raw materials and transportation. But P&G has been making huge profits. After some of its price increases went into effect, it reported an almost 25% profit margin.

Looking to buy your diapers elsewhere? Good luck. The market is dominated by P&G and Kimberly-Clark, which—NOT entirely coincidentally—raised its prices at the same time.

Another example: in April 2021, PepsiCo raised prices, blaming higher costs for ingredients, freight, and labor. It then recorded $3 billion in operating profits through September. How did it get away with this without losing customers?

Pepsi has only one major competitor, Coca-Cola, which promptly raised its own prices. Coca-Cola recorded $10 billion in revenues in the third quarter of 2021, up 16% from the previous year.

Food prices are soaring, but half of that is from meat, which costs 15% more than last year. There are only four major meat processing companies in America, which are all raising their prices and enjoying record profits.

Get the picture?

The underlying problem is not inflation. It’s corporate power. Since the 1980s, when the U.S. government all but abandoned antitrust enforcement, two-thirds of all American industries have become more concentrated.

Most are now dominated by a handful of corporations that coordinate prices and production. This is true of: banks, broadband, pharmaceutical companies,  airlines, meatpackers, and yes, soda.

Corporations in all these industries could easily absorb higher costs — including long overdue wage increases — without passing them on to consumers in the form of higher prices. But they aren’t.

Instead, they’re using their massive profits to line the pockets of major investors and executives — while both consumers and workers get shafted.

How can this structural problem be fixed? Fighting corporate concentration with more aggressive antitrust enforcement. And imposing a windfall profits tax on profitable corporations that are using this period of rising costs to gouge consumers. 

So don’t fall for the fear mongering about inflation. The real culprit here is corporate power.

bavaweekly 3-13-2022

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 18/03/2022 - 10:07pm in

Tags 

Video

Last week’s bavaweekly was a bit delayed given how jam-packed last week was. Between heading to Vicenza to pick up a few video game cabinets and then catching up from taking Tuesday off things snowballed and I was not able to record the weekly until Sunday—5 days after originally planned. Given that, this one has a bit more packed in it that usual, and I spent much of this week blogging everything a reported on in this video, so I waited on pushing this out until I had blogged the various projects I mention, such as experimenting with WordPress Multi-Region, updating ds106radio, a talk on “What was Eduglu,” as well as some bavacade new acquistions and a couple of successful game repairs.

Link to video on bava.tv

It was also cool to see Chris Lott blogging again—did he ever stop? I shouted him out in this weekly given he attended the “What was Eduglu” session organized by the awesome Todd Conaway as part of his push to get small with Unviersity of Washington faculty and reinforce the power of focused, community driven teaching and learning. The wisdom in that approach is real!

6×6-0 Back On the Horse?

Epiphanies and Jim Groom’s EDUGLU

I could do a full re-cap, but I am gonna keep this write-up a bit lean given I blogged the highlights at length over the past week, so if you are glutton for punishment you can find more in the various links above. I travel to Fred Vegas tomorrow, so going to try and do another bavaweekly to catch up a bit and get try and return to a weekly schedule.

Does Economics Understand China?

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Thu, 17/03/2022 - 3:44am in

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Video

As a discipline rooted in exceptionalism and capitalist values, is economics capable of comprehending socialism?

Streaming Jitsi through Peertube Live

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 16/03/2022 - 10:59pm in

Tags 

Open Source, Video

?

One of the cool things Taylor Jadin discovered recently is is easy it is to stream a Jitsi web video call through PeerTube. After creating a live stream in PeerTube, you would crab the stream URL and the stream key from the Live Settings tab:

Image of Live Settings tab in PeerTube

Live Settings tab in PeerTube where you can find the stream URL and private key

After that, head over to your Jitsi meet video call and look for the settings that are accessed by the ellipsis at the bottom of the screen:

Image of Settings for starting a live stream in Jitsi

Settings for starting a live stream in Jitsi

Once you select “Start live stream” you will see a dialog box that you will paste in the stream url and stream key, that should be separate by a slash “/” -so something like the following: rtmp://your.tv:1935/live/your-private-stream-key

Image of Jitsi dialog box for stream URL and key

Jitsi dialog box for adding stream URL and key, which are separate by a slash “/”

After that you will hear a voice telling you the stream is live and you should be able to see the call streaming through PeerTube within a few seconds.

WATCH: The Congressional Budget Office’s Single-Payer Pitch

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 15/03/2022 - 1:31am in

 The Congressional Budget Office’s Single-Payer Pitch

Friends:

The Daily Poster recently published a story revealing a surprising admission from the Republican-run Congressional Budget Office: Corporate health care is immiserating millions of Americans, and a Medicare for All-style system could fix the catastrophe.

Watch our new video about the CBO report — and then share it on social media and forward this email to friends and family.

We don’t answer to health insurance CEOs or lobbyists. We’re a reader-supported news outlet — which is why we can produce this video and report stories like this and this that corporate health care interests would rather keep out of public view.

We can also show how President Joe Biden and Democratic lawmakers have the power to scrap our current medical system and build one that works for everyone — but so far haven’t even considered passing the public option plan Biden touted on the campaign trail.

The only way for our elected officials to do right by all of us is to continue lifting the veil on these kinds of inconvenient truths.

Thanks for supporting our accountability journalism and for encouraging others to subscribe. And remember: If you want to help us do more, you can always use our tip jar or give a gift subscription.

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Can the BBC be reformed? - Interview with Tom Mills

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 11/03/2022 - 12:07am in

Ahead of the Media Democracy Festival, Counterfire's Shabbir Lakha spoke to Tom Mills, author of The BBC: Myth of a Public Service about the state of the public broadcasting service, the Tories and what the left should be campaigning about

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