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Why did I: Song inspiration playlist

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 15/01/2019 - 4:02pm in

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Lorenzo's Music Radio Playlist Vol. 2
Here is another playlist of collected songs that were the inspiration for our ROM-COMM MIXTAPE.
Previously I had posted a list of song that inspired the first track. This playlist was created while working on the second song for the mixtape - "Why did I".

It's a mixture of 80's pop, new wave, vaporwave, post-punk... stuff like that.

-Tom

Listen to the playlist on our YouTube Channel

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbvJrJ34c9MkHtls6KJLRLbnSJDAUDEh7

Nazism, Libertarianism and National Service

Okay, I’ve been trying to avoid blogging about the Nazis over the Christmas period. The season of peace and goodwill seems to me to be too precious to be spoiled with discussion of Hitler and his band of thugs. But I found a very interesting passage in Hitler’s Mein Kampf last night, which is very similar to the ideas some Libertarians and members of the Republican party over the other side of the Pond and various people on the British extreme right have on citizenship and military service.

I’ve discussed before how many of them follow the ideas of the late SF author, Robert Heinlein, in his book Starship Troopers, that only those, who have served in the armed forces should be granted citizenship and the right to vote. Starship Troopers was filmed by Paul Verhoeven, the director of Robocop and the Arnie version of Total Recall, amongst other movies, in the 1990s. He intended the film to be a satire, but some of those who saw the movie appear to have missed the point. I put up a piece from YouTube a little while, which pulled the book apart and showed the Fascistic worldview underneath, as well as the way the book contradicts itself on certain points.

Hitler made it clear in several passages in Mein Kampf that only those, who had served in the army through National Service should qualify as citizens. The passage here comes from the 1933 English abridged translation, published by Paternoster Row in London as My Struggle. On page 163 Hitler wrote

The Army also is not there merely to teach a man how to march and stand at attention, but it has to act as the final and highest school of national instruction. The young recruit must, of course, learn the use of his weapon, but at the same time he must continue his training for his future life. In that school the boy shall be transformed into a man; he shall not merely learn to obey, but shall be trained with a view to commanding at some future time. He shall learn to be silent, not only when he is justly blamed, but to bear injustice in silence, if necessary.

Fortified by the confidence in his own strength, filled with the esprit de corps which he feels in common with the rest, the boy shall attain to the conviction that his nation is unconquerable.

When his military service is over he must be able to show two documents: his legal papers as citizen of the State, which allow him to take part in public affairs, and his certificate of health, stating that, as regards health, he is fit to marry.

In the next paragraph he states that girls should be educated to be mothers.

In the case of female education, the main stress should be laid on bodily training; and after that, on development of character; and, last of all, of the intellect. But the one absolute aim of female education must be with a view to the future mother.

He returns to the theme later in the chapter ‘Citizens and Subjects of the State’, where he rejects the traditional Weimar categories of citizenship, where people were either state citizens or foreigners. He attacked that because

Race and nationality play no part in it. The child of a negro who once lived in a German protectorate and now is domiciled in Germany is automatically a citizen of the German State.

The whole procedure of acquiring State citizenship is not very different from that of becoming a member of an automobile club for instance. (p. 174).

He demanded instead that ‘the national State’ should divide ‘its inhabitants into three classes: State citizens, State subjects and foreigners’ and went on

In principle, birth only gives the status of a subject. This does not carry with it the right to serve yet as State official nor to take active part in politics, in the sense of voting at elections. In the case of every “State subject” race and nationality have to be proved. The “subject” is free at any time to cease being a subject and become a citizen in the country corresponding with his nationality. The “foreigner’ is only different from the “subject” in that he is a subject in a foreign State.

The young “subject” German nationality is bound to undergo the school education which is laid down for every German. Later on he must consent to undergo the bodily exercises as laid down by the State, and finally he enters the Army. Military training is universal. After his military service is over, the healthy young man with a blameless record will be solemnly invested with the rights of State citizenship. This is the most important document for his whole life on earth.

It must be held in greater honour to be a citizen of this Reich, even if only a crossing-sweeper, than to be a king in a foreign State.

The German girl is a “State subject”, but marriage makes her a citizen. But a German woman engaged in business may be granted rights of citizenship. (p. 175).

This is very close to Heinlein’s and the Libertarian’s ideas, with the exception that I don’t think Heinlein argued that women should only become citizens by marrying or becoming business entrepreneurs. It’s also very close to the attitudes of the Republican right and Fox News. A little while the Conservative propaganda broadcaster aired a piece saluting an American college that had made military style training a mandatory part of the curriculum for its freshers.

As for women, the extreme Right in both Britain and America is worried about the low birthrates in the West compared with Islam and the Developing World. They also have extremely traditional views about gender roles, so Libertarians like Vox Day and other antifeminists demand that women should stay at home to raise children rather than go out to work. Hitler’s recommendation that women should qualify for citizenship if they marry or have a business career looks positively progressive by comparison.

Heinlein’s ideas have also been taken over by part of UKIP. One of the leading Kippers a while ago said he thought it was a good idea. It’s questionable whether he really believed it or was simply try to appeal to the Rightists that did.

The belief that only those who have done their national service should be citizens on its own does not make someone a Fascist or a Nazi. But it is an undemocratic, Nazi idea. It should be rejected not just for itself, but also because it is part of the wider complex of Nazi ideology, which could all too easily follow its adoption.

Doctor Who New Year’s Day Special ‘Resolution’: Yes, Please! (PREVIEW)

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sun, 30/12/2018 - 8:35am in

With Christmas over, the Doctor Who television takeover in full swing, and the Doctor Who New Year’s Day Special ‘Resolution’ still three days away, the BBC has Whovians worldwide exactly where it wants them. In order to keep fans grasping for any and all information about the special that they can get their hands on, BBC Studios released a a new preview via the show’s YouTube channel. The 30-second video features the 13th Doctor Jodie Whittaker as well as her “fam” Tosin Cole, Madip Gill, and Bradley Walsh discussing – in frustrating generalities – just what is in store for the fans just 72 hours from now.

Unfortunately, after scouring through the video, look like no new footage from “Resolution” was included. However, the cast may have given us a few subtle hints. For her part, Whittaker states that she wants the audience to have fun and not be able to look away – not really all that helpful. Cole gives us a little bit of information, stating that the special is the most action-packed of the series – echoing Chris Chibnall‘s previous statements that the episode will be “epic.” One of the most common criticisms of Series 11 has been its lack of action, so fans and skeptics alike should be pleased with the prospect of lots of shiny explosions.

BBC Studios

Gill lets slip that the episode is a “race against time” – the idea that the gang is racing against the clock is new information, as most were likely assuming a ‘Christmas Invasion’-type situation. Given the footage of past civilizations in the trailers, it makes sense that the team could be travelling back in time to prevent some horrible thing from happening in the present – or future. Walsh gives us another clue that will likely drive many superfans to distraction:

“There are some interlocking things in the show, that they’ll go ‘oh wow, I didn’t see that coming.’ They’re going to love it.”

Walsh using “interlocking things in the show” is really interesting here, because he doesn’t say “episode,” he says “show.” The word choice could be unintentional, but it also opens up the possibility that there have been Easter eggs or other clues about the events of the special throughout Series 11. If he is talking about hints from other episodes, I have no idea what they could be. Maybe they are trying to get us to rewatch the season just to be sure (the thought has definitely crossed my mind).

doctorwho resolution preview2BBC Studios

Once again the BBC has given us a subtle tease – with very little information – and leaves us to stew until they drop the next breadcrumb. When they do, Bleeding Cool will be there for you.

The post Doctor Who New Year’s Day Special ‘Resolution’: Yes, Please! (PREVIEW) appeared first on Bleeding Cool News And Rumors.

Doctor Who Series 11: The Time [Lord] of Our Lives (BC Rewind)

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sat, 29/12/2018 - 2:05am in

In a new video posted on Doctor Who’s prolific YouTube channel, the showrunners and cast of Series 11 discuss their experiences working on one of the most famous television shows in the world. In “Series 11 – A Look Back” Jodie Whittaker, Mandip Gill, Tosin Cole, Bradley Walsh, Chris Chibnall, and executive producer Nikki Wilson gush about what made this series a unique experience for them.

While Wilson is invigorated and Chibnall appears a tad defensive, the cast comes off as authentically awed by the opportunity to work on the show and proud of what they have done. It is also important to note that the BBC has been posting videos like this almost weekly (often with the cast in the same locations and outfits) and yet the actors are still willing to sit down and talk to the fans (though Cole looks like he has had about enough in this one).

BBC Studios

Wilson shared some interesting insights on just why the show looks so different this year, including changes to how the show is actually filmed. She explains that the show’s new look and new showrunner made it seem like she was working on a completely new show this year. I’m assuming she means that in a positive way as she was smiling, but it could also be subtle shade at former showrunner Steven Moffat.

BBC Studios

Whittaker, the much-discussed Thirteenth Doctor, shared the surprising fact that Series 11 of Doctor Who was the longest filming project in her career – which could explain some of the rumors about her feeling overworked. She talks a lot about the breadth of the stories, actors, and filming locations throughout the season. While she discusses how much she put into her first season as the Doctor, she also seems genuinely excited about working on the show and energized by the experience. I hope that means that she plans to stick around for a while.

BBC Studios

One aspect of making Series 11 that was a vivid memory for the entire cast was their trip to South Africa to film parts of several episodes, including “The Ghost Monument” and “Rosa.” Gill, Cole, and Walsh specifically mentioned the poignant experience of filming “Rosa” with South Africa as a stand-in for the 1950’s American South.

doctorwho series 11 bcrewindBBC Studios

Once again, we have a new video from the BBC with clips from the season that showcase the numerous famous cameos and guest stars, and extreme locales – but no new information. There was no mention of the Doctor Who New Year’s Day Special and no hints of what is to come next season. That aside, the three-minute video is worth a watch to see the actors discussing their work and some of the behind-the-scenes clips that are included. For dedicated Doctor Who fans, it’s definitely worth checking out and try exploring the series’ YouTube channel – there is new stuff posted on there several times per week.

The post Doctor Who Series 11: The Time [Lord] of Our Lives (BC Rewind) appeared first on Bleeding Cool News And Rumors.

Doctor Who: Rose Tyler – The Woman Who Saved the Doctor (VIDEO)

Promoting the book Doctor Who: The Women Who Lived, an illustrated history of the women of Doctor Who, the BBC is releasing narrated featurettes about the lives of the most important women in Doctor Who lore. The first highlighted – appropriately enough – Susan Foreman, the Doctor’s first companion and granddaughter. The second edition was released on December 19th and focuses on the first and arguably most famous companion of “New  Who“: Rose Tyler.

Portrayed by former child star and pop idol Billie Piper, Rose was the local shop girl: she talked to her friends on her mobile, she had a boyfriend named Mickey, and a mother she loved.

“For the first nineteen years of her life, nothing happened. And then she met a man who could change his face and took her away from home in his magical machine.”

From the moment she first took the Ninth Doctor’s (Christopher Eccleston) hand in the basement of a Henrik’s Department Store and ran from attacking mannequins, the wide eyed, smart mouthed, and warm-hearted Rose Tyler became a fan favorite and a Doctor Who legend. Piper’s youth, energy, and humanity smoothed out the rough edges of Eccleston’s lonely, war-weary Doctor. Rose traveled with the Doctor for two seasons, sacrificing herself to save the lives of the Doctor and Captain Jack Harkness (John Barrowman). It was this sacrifice – and the Doctor’s effort to save her – that led to his eventual regeneration into David Tennant‘s Tenth Doctor. The chemistry between Tennant and Piper was consuming, and the relationship between their on-screen characters transformed into an epic love.

Finally, when the Doctor was faced with a human version of himself who was angry and unpredictable, he knew just what to do. Rose had made the Doctor love again, so it was only natural that the Doctor would turn to her when his human doppelganger needed the same humanizing influence. Leaving Rose and “Tentoo” on a beach that was the gateway to another dimension, the Doctor sacrificed his own happiness for Rose’s future.

Featuring the art of Mogamoka (0:00), Caz Zhu (0:22), Tammy Taylor (0:46), Katy Shuttleworth (1:19), Natalie Smilie (1:53), Sophie Cowdrey (2:37), Jo Be (3:10), and Kate Holden (3:42), the video is beautiful and made me incredibly nostalgic.

I ended up going down a rabbit hole on Doctor Who‘s prolific YouTube channel, viewing clip after clip of Rose and the Doctor. Watching Piper and Eccleston (and later Tennant) on screen I realized that Rose saved the Doctor in many ways. On the show she saved his life, his soul, and his faith in humanity. In the world of television, Piper’s portrayal of Rose was a boost for the show and drew in additional viewers, making future seasons and companions possible. And for fans like me who joined the Who-niverse in 2005, Rose taught us to love the Doctor as she did. It makes sense that her featurette would be second only to The First Doctor’s granddaughter.

Because together, they made all of the future companions possible.

doctorwho rose tyler doctorPenguin Group UK

Meet the women who run the Whoniverse.

From Sarah Jane Smith to Bill Potts, from Susan Foreman to the Thirteenth Doctor, women are the beating heart of Doctor Who. Whether they’re facing down Daleks or thwarting a Nestene invasion, these women don’t hang around waiting to be rescued – they roll their sleeves up and get stuck in. Scientists and soldiers, queens and canteen workers, they don’t let anything hold them back.

Featuring historical women such as Agatha Christie and Queen Victoria alongside fan favourites like Rose Tyler and Missy, The Women Who Lived tells the stories of women throughout space and time. Beautifully illustrated by a team of all-female artists, this collection of inspirational tales celebrates the power of women to change the universe.

Christel Dee and Simon Guerrier‘s Doctor Who: The Women Who Lived is on sale now.

The post Doctor Who: Rose Tyler – The Woman Who Saved the Doctor (VIDEO) appeared first on Bleeding Cool News And Rumors.

Kevin Logan on Tommy Robinson’s Intimidation of Internet Opponent, UKIP Collapse and British ‘Yellow Vest’ Copycats

This is a rather long video of a livestream held by male feminist and left-wing, anti-Fascist YouTuber, Kevin Logan, and Mike Stuchberry on Kevin Logan’s channel. It’s part of a series entitled ‘Let Them Eat Kek’, which as it’s title suggests, is about attacking the Alt-Right, and is a special devoted mainly to Tommy Robinson. It’s just under 3/4 of an hour long, and about half of it is the two discussing Robinson and his fans intimidating one of his internet critics and their family. The rest deals with a rather underwhelming UKIP rally with Tommy Robinson, which illustrates the depths of the Kippers’ decline, and the British imitators of the Yellow Vest protesters across the Channel. I’m putting it up because the conversations describes one instance of thuggish behaviour from Robinson, and shows why people like him should not be allowed anywhere near any political movement aspiring to respectability. And this in turn shows why UKIP’s present leader, Gerard Batten, is a disgrace for taking him and the rest of the far right YouTubers on.

The video was posted on the 16th December 2018, and the events they discuss occurred earlier that Monday. Robinson was annoyed at a piece posted on the Net by a long-time critic, Luke, a university student. Luke had amassed a sizable collection of videos posted on the web by Robinson, and used to put these up to show how Robinson contradicted himself or otherwise managed to make himself look stupid. What particular angered Robinson was a piece by Luke, in which he argued very persuasively that Robinson was not quite the working class hero he claims to be. Logan and Stuchberry believe that Robinson, real name Stephen Yaxley-Lennon, has an income in millions of pounds coming from crowd-funded donations, as well as funding by right-wing American think tanks like the Middle East Forum. Robinson lives somewhere on the outskirts of Luton in Bedfordshire. Luke found a house similar to Robinson’s – but which wasn’t the well-known Islamophobes – and from their similarity suggested that Robinson’s was worthy 950,000 pounds.

Robinson decided to show how outraged he was at this by driving up to Luke’s parents in Cumbria that evening in the company of his cousin and former bodyguard Kevin Carroll and Avi Yemeni. Yemeni’s a really repulsive individual, an Israeli-Australian, who claims to have shot civilians simply for throwing stones when he was a member of the IDF. The video contains a clip from one of the video’s Robinson’s band of thugs made of Yemeni boasting to Ali Dawah, another Islamophobe, about this. The trio then turned up outside Luke’s parents’ home at 2.30 in the morning and began filming. They were, in turn, filmed by one of the parents’ neighbours. This film of Robinson and co. is also in the video. For some reason Robinson didn’t take kindly to being filmed in turn. Luke was told of Robinson’s arrival at his parents by others on the Net. He went up there to arrive the next day. He then made some kind of agreement with Tommy Robinson which resulted in Luke taking his videos down. All of them. Robinson then drove back home to Bedfordshire, and posted at four O’clock or so that day a piece on the Net telling his followers not to harass Luke. Logan and Stuchberry aren’t impressed by this, as by that time the damage had been done. Robinson’s followers – the Tommunists, as they call themselves – had already bombarded Luke with threats and put up information about him and his family.

Logan and Stuchberry state that Robinson and his friends behaved like gangsters intimidating their opponents. They also discuss a Zelo Street article about the incident, which also states very firmly that Robinson and his gang were trying to threaten Luke and his parents. They also state that it’s rather hypocritical of Robinson, as he very frequently doorstepped people himself when he was working for Rebel Media. As a result of Robinson’s tactics, Luke was forced to lock down his Facebook and change his phone number. The two also ask how it is that Robinson remains free and not in prison when he pulls stunts like that. Robinson has served time for various offences, but it seems that he has just enough knowledge of the law to allow him to avoid being sent to jail for a very long time. They also think that the vast amount of money Robinson receives from his fans allow him to afford some very good legal advice. They also refute some of the allegations about the affair in the mainstream media, by stating that Luke did not actually reveal Robinson’s address or show his house.

The two then move on to the ‘Brexit Betrayed’ protest rally by UKIP, which was also addressed by Robinson. Logan and Stuchberry state that this also shows how far UKIP has imploded. The organisers expected about 20-30,000 to attend, and instead the crowd only number 4-5,000, who were outnumber by the anti-racism protesters. The party’s decline has also been shown in the similar reduction in the number of its MEPs. At its height after 2014 election, the party had 24 MEPs. This number has been drastically cut to nine, mostly by MEPs having to resign in disgrace. They were, the pair argue, never really interested in attending except when it concerned their own expenses. Farage himself was an example of this. they also accuse the former Kipperfuhrer of hypocrisy, as while the rest of us will have trouble travelling to the continent after Brexit, his children will find it considerably easier as they have German nationality. As for Robinson, he wasn’t noticeably interested in Europe. It’s simply a bandwagon he’s jumped on. But he’s added his own particularly twist on it. He told the crowd that in order to resist the islamization of Britain the EU would also have to be tackled.

They also tackle the despicable views expressed by two of the marchers. One was a man, who turned up with a model gallows, complete with a noose, who declared that Tweezer should be executed. Logan states that he’s not particularly fond of May himself, but this is disgusting as it’s stating that Tweezer should be killed. He wonders how this man wasn’t arrested. He’s also not impressed with another man, who holds up a placard saying ‘Jo Cox False Flag’. This fellow obviously believes in the conspiracy theory that the assassination of the anti-racist Labour MP Jo Cox by the Nazi Thomas Mair was a ‘false flag’ incident staged by the authorities to discredit the ‘Leave’ campaign, because it occurred at the same time as the referendum on the EU. Logan concludes that the intolerance of these two men bears out what Richard Spencer, the leader of the Alt Right, had already said about the far right: they don’t really care about freedom of speech.

The video ends with Logan and Stuchberry talking about the attempts by a group of British protesters to copy the Yellow Vest protests in France. These succeeded in closing Westminster Bridge, Tower Bridge and London Bridge. This bunch were fellow travelers of Robinson’s, led by James Goddard and Tracey Blackwell, a pair who turn up at every far right-wing demonstration. They are very much unimpressed at these protest, which blocked the road, because one of the vehicles they obstructed was an ambulance. And they’re also not impressed with the way the mainstream media appears to have been fascinated with the protests.

In addition to the two talking, there are odd interruptions by people breaking into the livestream to heckle them. Such as by telling Logan to get a job.

Robinson’s deliberate intimidation of his opponent, Luke, is worrying. Logan and Stuchberry are right when they compare it to that of the mob. But it’s also the type of tactics used by the far right, which has always used violence and the threat of violence to silence their opponents ever since the days of the Nazis and Italian Fascists. And both those movements carried that lawlessness into power with them. This is a very strong argument for not voting for UKIP, quite apart from the racism and islamophobia that the party appears to be courting and encouraging through the recruitment of Robinson and various far right YouTube personalities, like Count Dankula and Sargon of Akkad. If Batten expected them to boost the party’s membership, he’s gravely disappointed. People are leaving instead because of them. I’ve already put up a video by one Kipper bitterly denouncing the party for recruiting the far right activists. One of the people, who has left because of them is Farage himself.

Robinson and those like him are an active menace to democracy, and UKIP is dying because it’s recruited him.

Spitting Image on the ‘No Confidence’ Vote Against Thatcher

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 18/12/2018 - 6:52am in

Corbyn’s finally tabled a motion of ‘No Confidence’ in Tweezer after her refusal to allow a meaningful vote on the pathetic deal she’s made with Brussels. So I though I’d put up this video from Andrewscottuk’s channel on YouTube of a classic Spitting Image sketch about Thatcher. It’s a spoof on the ‘No Confidence’ vote the Tories held about Thatcher, which resulted in her resignation, and shows parliament singing ‘Go Now’ to her.

Enjoy!

And I hope the same thing happens to Tweezer, and she gets the message: Go. Now!

No, Lord Sugar: It Is Capitalism Stifling Industry and Creativity

Ho ho! Some pre-festive fun yesterday, when Mike put up a piece describing how Alan Sugar, the former head of Amstrad and the host of the British version of The Apprentice, threw a strop when left-wingers on the net were rude to him about his promise to emigrate if Jeremy Corbyn became PM. Instead of being horrified at the potential loss to our great nation, Red Labour instead posted a tweet in reply applauding it and saying it was a good reason to vote Labour. They said

Another good reason to #VoteLabour: @Lord_Sugar confirming he’ll leave the country if @jeremycorbyn becomes PM. All without any argument, of course: just personalised nonsense. What a relief that people like Sugar aren’t given gongs or made ‘Enterprise Tsars’ by @UKLabour anymore.

Unable to countenance the idea that the he wasn’t the idol of millions, whose every word was listened to by the masses in rapt attention, Sugar got angry and started insulting them. He tweeted back

Sour grapes you bunch of jealous anti enterprise anarchist losers. You have not achieved anything in life but like to criticize those who have. I paid a personal tax bill last year of over £50m enough to build a hospital. You find the taxes in future I’m off #corbynout

This ill-tempered comment provoked a wave of criticism from others in its turn. It also revealed Sugar to be a snob as defined by Thackeray: ‘a person who meanly admires mean things.’ He also fits another character type identified by Oscar Wilde – someone who knows the price of everything and the value of nothing. As for his boasting about how much he makes from the size of his tax bill, once upon a time this would have been considered a very poor comment by the long-established rich. Bragging about your wealth marked you out as being nouveau, a parvenu. Which Sugar is. He’s a self-made millionaire, who clearly believes his millions and his celebrity status excuse his poor manners.

The peeps on Twitter therefore lined up and told the brusque TV host that it was the ordinary people of this country – cleaners, bus drivers, firemen and women, carers, factory workers, teachers, nurses and so on, that actually kept this country running, rather than obscenely rich oligarchs like Sugar himself. They also pointed out that they too paid tax, and were determined to stay in this country, and they had also achieved things that could not be assessed in simple monetary turns. Like family and friends. As for the size of his tax bill, one person told Sugar to look at the size of his employees’ tax bills as opposed to the income of his lowest paid employees. They also wished him off on his planned departure from Britain, with comments like ‘Off you pop, send us a postcard, and so forth.

Several of the people tweeting denied being anarchists, with Darkest Angel also adding that he didn’t know what anarchism is. He clearly doesn’t. He obviously thinks that anarchists are just rabble-rousing hooligans, who go around attacking the rich without appreciating that there are genuine reasons for their anger and their criticisms of capitalism.

One of the tweeters, Jon Goulding, made it very clear that it was due to ordinary people that Sugar had made his money. He said

Don’t you dare claim that teachers and nurses and road builders and factory workers and farm labourers haven’t achieved anything in life just because they haven’t made skip loads of money. You wouldn’t have made jack shit if it weren’t for them, you selfish, shallow charlatan.

See https://voxpoliticalonline.com/2018/12/15/lord-sugar-got-precious-about-his-pledge-to-immigrate-if-corbyn-becomes-pm-and-got-what-he-deserved/

The great anarchist intellectual, Peter Kropotkin, made the same point in his article, Anarchist Communism, first published in The Nineteenth Century, and republished in Anarchist and Anarchist Communism: Its Basis and Principles, ed. by Nicolas Walter (London: Freedom Press 1987). Kropotkin argued that all property should be held in common, as every innovation built upon the work of millions of others, and depended on society for its effectiveness and value.

Our cities, connected by roads and brought into easy communication with all peopled parts of the globe, are the growth of centuries; and each house in these cities, each factory, each shop, derives its value, its very raison d’etre, from the fact that it is situated on a spot of the globe where thousands or millions have gather together. Every smallest part of the immense whole which we call the wealth of civilized nations derives its value precisely from being a part of this whole. What would be the value of an immense London shop or warehouse were it not situated precisely in London, which has become the gathering spot for five millions of human beings? And what the value of our coal-pits, our manufactures, our shipbuilding yards, were it not for the immense traffic which goes on across the seas, for the railways which transport mountains of merchandise, for the cities which number their inhabitants by millions? Who is, then,m the individual who has the right to step forward and, laying his hand on the smallest part of this immense whole, to say, ‘I have produced this; it belongs to me’? And how can we discriminate, in this immense interwoven whole, the part which the isolated individual may appropriate to himself with the slightest approach to justice? Houses and streets, canals and railways, machines and works of art, all these have been created by the combined efforts of generations past and present, of men living on these islands and men living thousands of miles away. (p. 37).

Moreover, Kropotkin also describes how capitalism actively prevents people from producing, in order to keep the prices of their products high. And this system creates monstrous inequalities in which the masses live in poverty, while the labour that could have been used alleviating poverty is spent on creating luxuries for the rich. He writes

But the figures just mentioned, while showing the real increase of production, give only a faint idea of what our production might be under a more reasonable economical organization. We know well that the owners of capital, while trying to produce more wares with fewer ‘hands’, are continually endeavouring at the same time to limit the production, in order to sell at higher prices. When the profits of a concern are going down, the owner of the capital limits the production, or totally suspends it, and prefers to engage his capital in foreign loans or Patagonian gold-mines. Just now there are plenty of pitmen in England who ask for nothing better than to be permitted to extract coal and supply with cheap fuel the households where children are shivering before empty chimneys. There are thousands of weavers who ask for nothing better than to weave stuffs in order to replace the ragged dress of the poor with decent clothing. And so in all branches of industry. How can we talk about a want of means of subsistence when thousands of factories lie idle in Great Britain alone; and when there are, just now, thousands and thousands of unemployed in London alone; thousands of men who would consider themselves happy7 if they were permitted to transform (under the guidance of experienced agriculturists) the clay of Middlesex into a rich soil, and to cover with cornfields and orchards the acres of meadow-land which now yields only a few pounds’ worth of hay? But they are prevented from doing so by the owners of the land, of the weaving factory, and of the coal-mine, because capital finds it more advantageous to supply the Khedive with harems and the Russian Government with ‘strategic railways’ and Krupp guns. Of course the maintenance of harems pays: it gives 10 or 15 per cent on the capital, while the extraction of coal does not pay-that is, it brings 3 or 5 per cent – and that is a sufficient reason for limiting the production and permitting would-be economists to indulge in reproaches to the working classes as to their too rapid multiplication!

Here we have instances of a direct and conscious limitation of production, due to the circumstance that the requisites for production belong to the few, and that these few have the right of disposing of them at their will, without caring about the interests of the community. But there is also the indirect and unconscious limiting of production – that which results from squandering the produce of human labour in luxury, instead of applying it to a further increase of production.

This last cannot even be estimated in figures, but a walk through the rich shops of any city and a glance at the manner in which money is squandered now, can give an approximate idea of this indirect limitation. When a rich man spends a thousand pounds for his stables, he squanders five to six thousand days of human labour, which might be used, under a better social organization, for supplying with comfortable homes those who are compelled to live now in dens. And when a lady spends a hundred pounds for her dress, we cannot but say that she squanders, at least, two years of human labour, which, again under a better organization, might have supplied a hundred women with decent dresses, and much more if applied to a further improvement of the instruments of production. Preachers thunder against luxury, because it is shameful to squander money for feeding and sheltering hounds and horses, when thousands live in the East End on sixpence a day, and other thousands have not even their miserable sixpence every day. But the economist sees more than that in our modern luxury: when millions of days of labour are spent every year for the satisfaction of the stupid vanity of the rich, he says that so many millions of workers have been diverted from the manufacture of those useful instruments which would permit us to decuple and centuple our present production of means of subsistence and of requisites for comfort. (pp. 34-5).

As for The Apprentice, Cassetteboy put up a couple of videos spoofing the show on YouTube a few years ago. They’re a couple of blokes, who edit footage of celebrities and politicians to make them appear ridiculous. And the results can be very, very funny indeed. Here’s what they did to Sugar and his team. Enjoy!

Doctor Who’s Susan Foreman: The Story of The Doctor’s Granddaughter and First Companion

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 17/12/2018 - 3:15am in

The BBC‘s official Doctor Who Channel on YouTube just released “The Story of Susan Foreman”, a fun video telling the story of Susan, the Doctor’s granddaughter and his first companion on his travels in the TARDIS.

Originally portrayed by Carole Ann Ford, Susan appeared in the original series of Doctor Who when it premiered back in 1963. You could say she was the original “genius teenager” on a British TV series: an alien who was much smarter than anyone she met on Earth, including her secondary school teachers Ian and Barbara.

Susan is actually the reason the whole premise of the show got its start. Shocked and puzzled by her deep knowledge of history and science–even more than their own–Ian and Barbara decided to find out how she could be so smart and also check to see if she was all right.

When they followed her home to the I.M. Foreman junkyard and suspected a mysterious old man of holding her prisoner (which would have been what we now call child abuse), they would have been obligated to alert the law and social services. That mysterious old man, of course, turned out to be her grandfather and The Doctor. He takes them prisoner and whisks them all off through Space and Time for the next few seasons where they had all kinds of adventures, forming the entire format of the show that has lasted over 50 years to this day.

In fact, you could say that new showrunner Chris Chibnall has brought series 11 back to the original version of the show: the Doctor travels with two or three companions and working as team, instead of emphasizing the romantic tension between the male Doctor and his younger female companion. Chibnall is also moving closer to the show’s original brief to educate young viewers about major historical events.

Even though it’s been decades since Susan showed up in the show–the last time being the Five Doctors crossover special back in 1983–she is still an extremely popular companion. Many fans have been hoping she would make an appearance on the show, preferably played by Ford again. Her presence is still felt on the show, with the Doctor often mentioning her in passing and the 12th Doctor keeping a photo of her on his desk at the university where he was teaching. In the TV movie An Adventure in Space and Time, which told the story of first Doctor William Hartnell,  Ford was played by Claudia Grant, who has since gone on to play the role in Big Finish Production’s new audio dramas featuring the First Doctor and his companions.

doctor who susan foremanBBC

The video is a promo for the upcoming Doctor Who companion book The Women Who Lived: Amazing Tales for Future Time Lords, about all the women the Doctor has ever traveled with and met, from Susan to Queen Elizabeth to Tegan to Romana to Rose to Missy to Amy Pond to River Song. You name them, they’re all here in this book.

There’s another good reason to draw attention to this video–it gives us an opportunity to give credit to the artists who drew the illustrations for this video and whose work is featured in the book. Some of them are known comics artists, but they all deserve more mainstream attention:

Artists: 1. Lara Pickle (0:00) 2. Dani Jones (0:33) 3. Caz Zhu (1:01) 4. Mogamoka (1:26) 5. Rachael Smith (1:48) 6. Kate Holden (2:18) 7. Sonia Leong (2:43) 8. Gwen Burns (3:10)

Doctor Who: The Women Who Lived: Amazing Tales for Future Time Lords is now available at bookshops and online.

The post Doctor Who’s Susan Foreman: The Story of The Doctor’s Granddaughter and First Companion appeared first on Bleeding Cool News And Rumors.

African Drone with Pilot/Passenger

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sun, 16/12/2018 - 8:09pm in

Yesterday I put up a piece I found on YouTube of a group of Kenyan engineers building what they believed to be Africa’s first passenger-carrying drone. The video showed them testing it in flight loaded with bags of sugar.

This short video from Sami’s channel on YouTube shows the machine in flight, carrying a passenger. The film begins with the team thanking the governor of Nairobi, Mike Sonko, before showing the flight. The man himself wasn’t terribly happy in the air, as a caption reads that it was only then that they realized he was frightened of heights.

The photo of the team at the end shows that the majority of its members are Black Africans, but there’s also a White guy and an Asian.

As I said in my earlier post about the vehicle, this shows the immense creativity of the people of Africa, a creativity that is being held back due to the continent’s poverty and kleptocratic politicians. If these could be overcome, and the continent reach the same stage of develop as the industrial West, we would be astonished at what they could achieve. This video offers a glimpse of the massive potential waiting to be unlocked.

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